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NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
UNIVERSITY 



GRADUATE 






This catalog is intended for informational purposes only. Requirements, rules, procedures, courses and 
informational statements set forth herein are subject to change. Notice of changes will be conveyed to duly 
enrolled students and other appropriate persons at the time such changes are effected. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
(USPS 393-040) 

VOLUME 96 JUNE 1996 NUMBER 2 

Published quarterly by North Carolina State University, Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 1 12 Peele Hall, 
Box 7103, Raleigh, NC 27695-7103. Second class postage paid at Raleigh, NC 27676. ATTN 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to North Carolina State University, Box 7103, Raleigh, NC 27695- 
7103. 




PA 



bum: 



1 



Graduate Catalog 




North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



CONTENTS 

North Carolina State University 1 

Nondiscrimination Statement 3 

Code of Student Conduct 3 

Administration, North Carolina State University 4 

The Calendar 6 

The Graduate School 13 

Graduate Student Association 13 

General Information 14 

Apphcation 14 

International Students 14 

Admission 14 

Registration and Records 19 

Tuition and Fees 24 

Financial Support for Graduate Students 30 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 30 

Graduate School Fellowships 32 

Other Financial Aid 34 

Military Education and Training 35 

Health Services 36 

Housing 37 

Graduate Programs 39 

Master's Degrees 39 

Master of Science and Master of Arts 39 

Master's Degree in a Designated Field 39 

Requirements for Master's Degrees 39 

Summary of Procedures for Master's Degrees 45 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees 47 

Summary of Procedures for Doctor of Philosophy and 

Doctor of Education Degrees 52 

The NC State Libraries 54 

Institutes 54 



Special Laboratories, Facilities and Centers 55 

Special Programs 64 

University Patent aiid Copyright Procedures 65 

Fields of Instruction 72 

Major Fields of Study 77 

Minor and Other Organized Programs of Study 209 

Graduate Faculty 222 

Administration, University of North Carolina 267 

Board of Governors 267 

History of the University of North Carolina 268 

Historical Sketch of North Carolina State University 269 

Board of Trustees 271 

Mission of North Carolina State University 271 

PoUcy on Illegal Drugs 273 

hidex 276 

Campus Map 286-287 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

North Carolina State University (NC State) is a national center for research, 
teaching and extension. As a Land-Grant state university, it shares the distinctive 
characteristics of these institutions nationally —broad academic offerings, extensive 
pubUc service, national and international activities, and large-scale extension and 
research programs. 

North Carolina State University is committed to equahty of educational opportunity 
and does not discriminate against apphcants, students or employees based on race, 
color, national origin, rehgion, sex, age or handicap. Moreover, NC State is open 
to people of all races and actively seeks to promote racial integration by recruiting 
and enrolling a larger number of African- American students. 

NC State's rich and varied academic program is comprised of 96 undergraduate 
degree programs, master's degrees in 86 fields of study, 52 doctoral degree 
programs and the doctor of veterinary medicine program. The University offers 
approximately 2,900 courses. 

Research activities span a broad spectrum of scientific, technological and scholarly 
endeavors with a budget of some $170 miUion annually. 

Extension offices in each of the state's 100 counties and on the Cherokee hidian 
reservation assist in carrying the University's teaching and research programs 
throughout the state. The diversity of these programs spans such fields as 
agriculture, design, education, engineering, forestry, humanities, management, 
marine and aivironmental sciences, textiles, veterinary medicine, and the physical, 
social and life sciences. 

The University's annual expenditures reach approximately $454 miUion, and its 
permanent employees total about 6,000. There are more than 2,700 faculty and 
professional staff, including approximately 2,000 graduate faculty. Among the many 
honors and recognitions received by members of the faculty are seven memberships 
in the National Academy of Science and five in the National Academy of 
Engineering, 44 named professorships, 14 distinguished university professorships 
and 16 Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professors. 

NC State's campus, located just west of the downtown area of Raleigh, totals some 
1,800 acres. This includes the c^itral campus of 623 acres with some 166 buildings. 



the adjac«it Ceateamal Campus of 1,000 acres under development, and the 182-acre 
College of Veterinary Medicine campus. 

In addition, the University has some 88,000 acres statewide, including one research 
and axlowment forest of 78,000 acres. Near the campus are 2,500 acres containing 
research farms; biology and ecology sites; genetics, horticulture and floriculture 
nurseries; teaching and research forests; and Carter-Finley Stadium. 

With a total enrollment of more than 27,500, the University has approximately 
18,800 undergraduate students, 5,150 graduate students, 3,280 lifelong education 
students and 284 in veterinary medicine. The student population consists of 
a{^)roximately 16,180 men and 11,357 women, including 2,607 African-Americans 
and 1,640 other minority students. Students come to NC State from every state in 
the union and at least 90 foreign countries are represented by 1 ,058 international 
students. 

The University is organized in nine colleges, the School of Design and the Graduate 
School. The nine colleges are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Education and 
Psychology, Engineering, Forest Resources, Humanities and Social Sciences, 
Management, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Textiles and Veterinary 
Medicine. In addition, a complex of divisions and programs provides for a wide 
range of special programs in academic affairs, research and extension. 

North Carolina State University is one of three Research Triangle Universities, 
along with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
forming the 30-mile triangle which encompasses the Research Triangle Park and 
includes the Research Triangle Institute, a not-for-profit, contract research 
organization founded by the three universities. 

NC State is a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land- 
Grant Colleges. It is also a member of the American Council on Education, the 
College En-trance Examination Board, the Council of Graduate Schools, the 
National Commission on Accrediting and the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools. 

NC State is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools to award the associate, baccalaureate, master's and doctoral 
degrees. Numerous professional fields are also accredited by national accrediting 
agencies. 



Nondiscrimination Statement 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to equality of opportunity within its 
community. Accordingly, North Carolina State University does not practice or 
condone discrimination, in any form, against students, employees or applicants on 
the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age or disability. North 
Carolina State University commits itself to positive action to secure equal 
opjxjrtunity regardless of those characteristics. 

North Carolina State University supports the protection available to members of its 
community under all appUcable Federal laws, including Titles VI and VII of the 
Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 
799 A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Vietnam Veterans Readjustment 
Assistance Act of 1974, and Executive Order 11246, the Americans with Disabihties 
Act of 1990, and the Family Medical Leave Act ot 1993. Forinformation concerning 
these provisions, contact: 

Ms. Joanne Woodard 

Interim University Affirmative Action Officer 

304-A Holladay Hall 

Box 7101 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh North Carohna 27695-7101 

Phone:(919) 515-3148 or 515^559 



Code of Student Conduct 

North Carolina State University is committed to academic integrity, and all students 
are required to adhere to the NCSU Code of Student Conduct. Graduate students may 
also refer to the NCSU Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities document. 

Additional Information 

If additional information is needed, contact the Graduate School, 103 Peele Hall, 
P. O. Box 7102, North CaroUna State University, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7102 
(telephone 9 1 9/5 1 5-2872) . 



ADMINISTRATION 

Larry K. Monteith, Chancellor 

Phillip J. Stiles, Provost and Vice Chancellor 

Debra W. Stewart, Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate School 

Charles G. Moreland, Vice Chancellor for Research, Outreach and Extension 

George L. Worsley, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business 

Thomas H. Stafford Jr., Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
Jeffrey P. McNeill, V/c€ Chancellor for University Advancement 

Deans of Colleges and Schools 

Durward F. Bateman, Dean, Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Marvin J. Malecha, Dean, Design 

Joan J. Michael, Dean, Education and Psychology 

John B. GiUigan, Interim Dean, Engineering 

Larry W. Tombaugh, Dean, Forest Resources 

Margaret A. Zahn, Dean, Humanities and Social Sciences 

Richard J. Lewis, Dean, Management 

Jerry L. Whitten, Dean, Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Robert A. Bamhardt, Dean, Textiles 

Oscar J. Fletcher, Dean, Veterinary Medicine 

Graduate School—Administrative Office 

D. W. Stewart, Dean 

R. S. Sowell, Associate Dean 

M. F. King, Associate Dean 

T. Melton, Associate Dean 



4 



Administrative Board of the Graduate School 



D. W. Stewart, Dean 

R. S. Sowell, Associate Dean 

M. F. King, Associate Dean 

T. Melton, Associate Dean 

S. M. Bedair, Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering 

B. G. Beezer, Professor of Educational Leadership and 

Program Evaluation; Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs, College of Education and Psychology 

A. J. De Grand, Professor of History 
J. G. Gilligan, Professor of Nuclear Engineering; Associate 

Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Engineering 

B. Hammerberg, Professor of Microbiology, Pathology 

and Parasitology 

C. R. Knoeber, Professor of Economics 
CD. Livengood, Prof essor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry 

and Science; Associate Dean for Academic Programs, 
College of Textiles 

G. E. Mitchell, Professor of Physics and Director of 
Graduate Programs 

J. L. Oblinger, Professor of Food Science; Associate Dean 

and Director of Academic Programs, College of Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences 

C. D. Raper, Jr., Professor of Soil Science and Director of 

Graduate Programs 
S. S. Snyder, Associate Professor of Psychology and Director 
of Graduate Programs 

D. L. Solomon, Professor of Statistics; Associate Dean of 

Academic Affairs, College of Physical and Mathematical 

Sciences 
P. Tesar, Professor of Architecture 
B. E. Wilson, Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and 

Tourism Management 



Term Expires 



December, 1997 



June, 1999 



February, 1997 
June, 1998 

December, 1999 

April, 1997 
August, 1998 



July, 1997 



June, 1999 



June, 1999 



June, 1997 



June, 1998 



August, 1999 
June, 1999 



THE CALENDAR 



NOTF.' T his calendp r /c ^n^jp rj to period ir rfivjpw and rpvhinn. 
SPRING SEMESTER, 1996 



January 10 


Wed. 


January 15 


Mon. 


January 18 


Thurs 



January 25 



February 21 
February 22 



March 8 
March 18 



March 22 



March 29 



Thurs. 



Wed. 
Thurs. 



Fri. 
Mon. 



Fri. 



Fri. 



April 5 
April 26 



Fri. 
Fri. 



First day of classes 

HoUday (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day) 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to register (includes payment of 

tuition and fees) or to add a course. Last day 

to withdraw or drop a course or to change 

firom credit to audit with a refund or reduction. 

(NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is based 

on the official number of hours and course 

carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) TRACS 

closes at 5:00 p.m. (after this day, drops 

processed in 1000 Harris Hall) 

Academic Difficulty Reports due 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 400 level or below. Last day to 

change from credit to audit at the 400 level or 

below. 

Spring vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m. 

Centennial Campus; Registration advising for 

1996 Summer Sessions and Fall Semester 

begins 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 

without a grade at the 500 or 600 level. Last 

day to change from credit to audit at the 500 or 

600 level 

Deadline for submission of theses or 

dissertations to the Graduate School, in final 

form as approved by advisory committees, by 

candidates for master's and doctoral degrees 

in May, 1996. Last day for unconditional pass 

on final oral examinations by candidates for 

master's degrees not requiring theses 

HoUday (Good Friday) 

Last day of classes 



April 29-May 7 Mon.-Tues. 
May 11 Sat. 

SUMMER SESSIONS, 1996 

First Session 



Final examinations 
Spring Commencement 



May 21 
May 22 

May 24 



Tues. 
Wed. 

Fri. 



June 4 



June 5 



Tues, 



Wed. 



June 21 


Fri. 


June 24-25 


Mon.-Tues 


Second Session 




July 1 


Mon. 


July 2 


Tues. 



July 3 



Wed. 



July 4 
Julys 



Thurs. 
Fri. 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to register (includes payment of 

tuition and fees) or to add a course. Last day 

to withdraw or drop a course with a refund 

(NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is based 

on the official number of hours and courses 

carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) TRACS 

closes at 5:00 p.m. (After this day, drops 

proceessed in 1000 Harris Hall) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 400 level or below. Last day to 

change from credit to audit at the 400 level or 

below 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 500 or 600 level. Last day to 

change from credit to audit at the 500 or 600 

level 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 
instructor 

Deadline for submission of theses and disserta- 
tions to the Graduate School, infiruilform as 
approved by advisory committees, by can- 
didates for master's and doctoral degrees in 
August, 1996. Last day for unconditional pass 
on final oral examinations by candidates for 
master's degrees not requiring theses. 
Hohday (Independence Day) 
No classes 



Julys 
July 8 



July 17 



July 18 



Mon. 
Mon, 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



August 5 Mon. 

August 6 Tues. 

August 7-8 Wed. -Thurs. 



Classes resume at 7:30 a.m. 

Last day to register (includes payment of 

tuition and fees) or to add a course. Last day 

to withdraw or drop a course with a refund 

(NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is based 

on the official number of hours and courses 

carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day. )T^LACS 

closes at 5:00 p.m. (After this day, drops 

processed in 1000 Harris Hall) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 400 level or below. Last day to 

change from credit to audit at the 400 level or 

below 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 500 or 600 level. Last day to 

change from credit to audit at the 500 or 600 

level 

Last day of classes 

Reading day 

Final examinations 



FALL SEMESTER, 1996 



August 21 
August 28 

Sept. 2 
Sept. 5 



October 3 



October 4 
October 11 



Wed. 
Wed. 

Mon. 
Thurs. 



Thurs. 



Fri. 
Fri. 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

HoUday (Labor Day) 

Last day to register (includes payment of 

tuition and fees) or to add a course. Last day 

to withdraw or drop a course or change from 

credit to audit with a refund or reduction. 

{NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is based 

on the official number of hours and courses 

carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) TRACS 

closes at 5:00 p.m. (after this day, drops 

processed in 1000 Harris Hall) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 400 level or below. Last day to 

change from credit to audit at the 400 level or 

below 

Academic Difficulty Reports due 

Fall vacation begins at 1:15 p.m.; 1:45 p.m.. 

Centennial Campus 



October 16 Wed. 

October 21 Mon. 

October 25 Fri. 

October 27 Sun. 

November 8 Fri. 



November 26 Tues. 

December 2 Mon. 

December 6 Fri. 

December 9-17 Mon. -Tues. 

December 18 Wed. 



Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m., Cen- 
tennial Campus 

Registration advising for 1997 Spring Semester 
begins 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 
a grade at the 500 or 600 level. Last day to 
change from credit to audit at the 500 or 600 
level 

TRACS registration opens for 1997 spring 
semester 

Deadline for submission of theses and disserta- 
tions to the Graduate School, in final form as 
approved by advisory committees, by can- 
didates for master's and doctoral degrees in 
December, 1996. Last day for unconditional 
pass on final oral examinations by candidates 
for master's degrees not requiring theses. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m. 
Centennial Campus 
Last day of classes 
Final examinations 
Fall Graduation Exercise 



SPRmG SEMESTER, 1997 



January 8 Wed. 

January 20 Mon. 

January 15 Thurs. 



January 23 



February 19 
Februaiy 20 



Thurs. 



Wed. 
Thurs. 



First day of classes 

Hohday (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day) 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to register (includes payment of 

tuition and fees) or to add a course. Last day 

to withdraw or drop a course or to change 

from credit to audit with a refund or reduction. 

(NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is based 

on the official number of hours and courses 

carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) TRACS 

closes at 5:00 p.m. (after this day, drops 

processed in 1000 Harris Hall) 

Academic Difficulty Reports due 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 400 level or below. Last day to 



March 7 
March 17 



March 7 



March 27 



Fri. 
Mon. 



Fri. 



Thurs. 



March 28 Fri. 

April 25 Fri. 

April 28-May 6 Mon.-Tues. 

May 10 Sat. 



change from credit to audit at the 400 level or 
below 

Spring vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m., Cen- 
t^mial Campus. Registration advising for 1995 
Summer Sessions and Fall Semester begins 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 
a grade at the 500 or 600 level. Last day to 
change from credit to audit at the 500 or 600 
level 

Deadline for submission of theses and disserta- 
tions to the Graduate School, in final form as 
approved by advisory committees, by can- 
didates for master's and doctoral degrees in 
May, 1997. Last day for unconditional pass on 
final oral examinations by candidates for 
master's degrees not requiring theses. 
Hohday (Good Friday) 
Last day of classes 
Final examinations 
Spring Commencement 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1997 

First Session 



May 20 
May 21 

May 23 



Tues. 
Wed. 

Fri. 



June 3 



June 4 



Tues. 



Wed/ 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to register (includes payment of 

tuition and fees) or to add a course. Last day 

to withdraw or drop a course with a refund. 

{NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is based 

on the official ruimber of hours and courses 

carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) TRACS 

closes at 5:00 p.m. (after this day, drops 

processed in 1000 Harris Hall) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 400 level or below. Last day to 

change from credit to audit at the 400 level or 

below 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 

a grade at the 500 or 600 level. Last day to 



10 



June 20 


Fri. 


June 23-24 


Mon.-Tues 


Second Session 




July 1 


Tues. 


July 2 


Wed. 


July 4 


Fri. 


July? 


Mon. 



July? 



July 16 



July 17 



August 4 
August 6-? 



Mon. 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Mon. 
Wed. -Thurs. 



change from credit to audit at the 500 or 600 

level 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 
instructor 

HoUday (Independence Day) 
Deadline for submission of theses and disserta- 
tions to the Graduate School, in final form as 
approved by advisory committees, by can- 
didates for master's and doctoral degrees in 
August. 1997. Last day for unconditional pass 
on final oral examinations by candidates for 
master's degrees not requiring theses. 
Last day to register (includes payment of 
tuition and fees) or to add a course. Last day 
to withdraw or drop a course with a refund. 
(NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is based 
on the official ruimber of hours and courses 
carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) TRACS 
closes at 5:00 p.m. (after this day, drops 
processed in 1000 Harris Hall) 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 
a grade at the 400 level or below. Last day to 
change from credit to audit at the 400 level or 
below 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without 
a grade at the 500 or 600 level. Last day to 
change from credit to audit at the 500 or 600 
level 

Last day of classes 
Final examinations 



FALL SEMESTER, 1997 



August 20 


Wed. 


First day of classes 


Sept. 1 


Mon. 


Hohday (Labor Day) 


October 9 


Fri. 


Fall vacation begins 


October 14 


Mon. 


Classes resume 



11 



November 7 



Fri. 



November 25 Tues. 

December 1 Mon. 

December 5 Fri. 

December 8-16 Mon. -Tues. 

December 17 Wed. 



Deadline for submission of theses and disserta- 
tions to the Graduate School, in final form as 
approved by advisory committees, by candidates 
for master's and doctoral degrees in December, 
1997. Last day for unconditional pass on final 
oral examinations by candidates for master's 
degrees not requiring theses. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 
Classes resume 
Last day of classes 
Final examinations 
Fall Graduation Exercise 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1998 



January 7 


Wed. 


January 19 


Mon. 


March 6 


Fri. 


March 16 


Mon. 


March 27 


Fri. 



April 10 Fri. 

April 24 Fri. 

April 27 -May 5 Mon. -Tues. 

May 9 Sat. 



First day of classes 

Hohday (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day) 
Spring vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 
Classes resume 

Deadline for submission of theses and disserta- 
tions to the Graduate School, in final form as 
approved by advisory committees, by candidates 
for master's and doctoral degrees in May, 1998. 
Last day for unconditional pass on final oral 
examinations by candidates for master's degrees 
not requiring theses. 
Hohday (Good Friday) 
Last day of classes 
Final examinations 
Spring Commencement 



12 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Graduate instruction was first offered at North Carolina State University in 1893, 
and the first doctoral degree was conferred in 1926. Li the ensuing years, the 
Graduate School has grown steadily and now provides instruction and facihties for 
advanced study and research in the fields of agriculture and life sciences, design, 
education, engineering, forest resources, humanities and social sciences, manage- 
ment, physical and mathematical sciences, textiles and veterinary medicine. 

The Graduate School is currently composed of more than 2,000 graduate faculty 
manbers. Educated at major universities throughout the world and estabUshed both 
in advanced teaching and research, these scholars guide the University's 5,150 
master's and doctoral students from all areas of the United States and many other 
coimtries. 

The faculty and students have available exceptional facihties, including hbraries, 
laboratories, modem equipment and special research areas. Additionally, a 
cooperative agreement exists among the Graduate Schools of the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Duke Uni- 
versity and North Carolina State University which increases the educational and 
research possibihties associated with each. 

Graduate Student Association 

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is an academic, pohtical and social organi- 
zation comprising all graduate students. It is governed by elected officers and 
represen-tatives from departmental GSA chapters. Officially recognized by the 
university as the voice of graduate students, it provides graduate student 
r^jresentation on various university committees. The GSA president has full voting 
membership on the Administrative Board of the Graduate School and meets 
regularly with other university officials. 

Some services provided by the GSA include travel reimbursement for presenting 
original research at professorial conferences, a graduate student orientation, a 
teaching effectiveness workshop and outstanding TA awards, cash rebates to 
departmental chap-ters and assistance with electronic communications among NC 
State graduate students. 

The GSA can provide answers to questions regarding graduate student life and may 
be contacted via departmental representatives or the GSA president, whose telephone 
number can be obtained ftxDm the Graduate School. Students may also visit the GSA 
Home Page embedded in the Graduate School's Home Page on the World Wide 
Wdj. All graduate students are invited to attend the monthly meetings and become 
involved with the GSA. 

13 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Application 

Ajjplications for admission must be accompanied by the following: two official tran- 
scripts from all colleges and universities previously attended, references from at 
least three i>eople who know of the student's academic record and potential for 
graduate study, a non-refundable apphcation fee of $55 and, in most cases, an 
official statement of the student's Graduate Record Examination or other 
standardized test scores. Apphcation and reference forms may be obtained by 
writing or visiting the Graduate School, 103 Peele Hall, Box 7102, North Carolina 
State University, Raleigh, N. C. 27695-7102. When completed, all apphcation 
materials should be returned according to instructions. Apphcation is made for a 
specific degree program and date of enrollment (see "Admission"). 

International Students 

Students whose native language is other than Enghsh, regardless of citizenship, must 
submit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores as evidence of abihty 
to use Fjiglish at a level of competence sufficient for graduate work. The minimum 
requirement for admission is a TOEFL score of 550, with scores of 50 on at least 
two of the sections and no section score below 45. (Minimum score subject to 
change; departments may estabhsh a higher minimum requirement.) The test date 
must be within 24 months of the apphcation deadline date before the semester for 
which the apphcation is being reviewed. An n ffirinl score report issued by the 
Educational Testing Service is required. All international students must be cleared 
by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at the beginning of their 
initial semester in residence and may be required to take additional course work in 
English. The international apphcant must also provide the University with 
verification that the required funds are available to support the proposed program 
of advanced study. Foreign nationals in the United States at the time apphcation is 
made must also provide information regarding their current visa status. The Uni- 
versity provides special forms to be used by the apphcant in supplying this 
information. 

Admission 

The procedures followed in evaluating an apphcant 's potential for success in 
graduate work and the criteria used for admissions decisions vary according to 
programs and colleges/schools and reflect an evaluation of the apphcant 's potential 
to engage in graduate work and the capabihty of the individual programs to 
accommodate additional students. Most programs consider apphcations as they 
arrive, while others accumulate apphcations and make recommendations on 

14 



admission at certain times during the year. Generally, requests for admission are 
considered by departmental admissions committees which forward the departmental 
recommendations to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Students are admitted to fiill or provisional status in a specific degree program. 
Admission is granted for a specific semester or summer term. Any change in the 
admission date must be requested in writing and approved by the department and 
Graduate School. Once the requirements for that degree program have been 
completed, no further registration as a graduate student will be permitted unless 
admission to a new graduate classification has been formally approved. Students 
with special objectives may request admission in the "Graduate-Unclassified Status" 
(see next page) or register in the "Post-Baccalaureate Studies" program (see p. 17) 
through the Division of Lifelong Education. 

ADMISSION TO DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Full Graduate Standing: To be considered for admission in full graduate standing, 
an apphcant must have a baccalaureate degree from a college or university 
recognized as standard by a regional or general accrediting agency and must have 
at least a "B" average in the undergraduate major or in the latest graduate degree 
program. 

Provisional Admission: 1 . Provisional admission may be granted to appUcants with 
bachelor's degrees from accredited institutions who lack undergraduate work 
considered essential for graduate study in a major field. Course work, without 
graduate credit, will be required to make up such deficiencies before admission to 
full status can be granted. 

AppUcants with bachelor's degrees from nonaccredited institutions may be granted 
provisional admission when their academic records warrant this status. Additional 
course work will be required of such students when deficiencies in previous training 
are apparent. 

Full graduate standing is granted when the deficiencies responsible for the 
provisional status are corrected, provided the student has maintained a satisfactory 
academic record (3.0 Grade Point Average) on all course work taken in a graduate 
classification. A change from provisional status to full graduate standing is effected 
only upon the recommendation of the department in which the student is seeking the 
degree. 

2. Students with bachelor's degrees from accredited institutions whose scholastic 
records are below the standards for admission to full graduate standing may be 
admitted provisionally when unavoidable, extenuating circumstances affected their 
undergraduate averages or when progressive improvement in their undergraduate 
work warrants provisional admission. Students admitted provisionally under these 



15 



circumstances will have their status changed to full graduate standing after 
conviction of nine or more graduate credit hours following admission provided the 
student has maintained a GPA of at least 3.0 

A graduate student is not ehgible for app>ointment to an assistantship or fellowship 
while on provisional status. 

MEDICAL fflSTORY AND IMMUMZATION RECORDS 

All graduate students admitted to a degree program are required by State law to 
submit a report of medical history and immunization documentation prior to 
convicting their initial registration. This report must document immunization against 
tetanus/diptheria, measles, German measles, poUo and a TB skin test. NC State 
students returning to Graduate School must have their medical history on file 
i^dated. The required reports should be received in the Student Health Service at 
least thirty days before registration. If this requirement is not met, dismissal from 
school is mandatory under the law. 

GRADUATE-UNCLASSIFIED STATUS 

The Graduate-Unclassified status is a temporary classification and students admitted 
to this status are not candidates for degrees. They may take courses for graduate 
credit but may not apply more than 10 credits earned while in this status to any 
program leading to an advanced degree at this institution. Unclassified graduate 
students are expected to meet the same admissions requirements that apply to 
graduate stud^its in full standing. Any individual having an interest in applying for 
admission as a Graduate-Unclassified Student should correspond with the Graduate 
Dean describing his or her particular interests and objectives prior to making 
apphcation. 

Special Graduate-unclassified Status for International Student Visitors 

1. Intemational student visitors must state their educational objectives at NC State 
and the time expected to accomplish those objectives. The educational objective may 
not be to seek a graduate degree at NC State. 

2. They are expected to meet the same minimum academic admission requirements 
that apply to graduate students in full standing. 

3. They are expected to meet the same TOEFL requirements that apply to 
intemational students who are admitted to master's and doctoral programs if they 
plan to take courses. If they plan to register for Departmental Research 699 only, 
they are not required to take the TOEFL. 

4. They must be recommended by the Director of Graduate Programs in the 
department in which they plan to take courses or do research. 

5. They may be in this special admission status for a period not to exceed one year. 

6. They may hokl a research assistantship but may not hold a teaching assistantship. 

7. They will not be ehgible for tuition remission. 



16 



POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDIES (PBS) 

The Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) classification is designed for U. S. citizens 
who wish to undertake acadanic work beyond the baccalaureate degree but who are 
not currently admitted to a degree program. This classification is not open to 
international students with the exception of the spouse of a regularly enrolled NC 
State student. In special cases where students are sponsored by an agency of the 
U. S. government for specialized, non-degree study, approval may be given by the 
Graduate School for registration in the Post-Baccalaureate Studies classification. The 
following poUcies apply to students who wish to register for PBS: 

1. All must have baccalaureate degrees from accredited institutions of higher 
education. Registration is through the Dvision of Lifelong Education. 

2. All classes taken for credit by PBS students will be graded in the usual 
manner that apphes for the particular course (A -I- /-through F or S,U), All 
courses taken at NC State will show on the student's transcript. 

3. If the student is admitted as a graduate student, a maximum of nine hours 
may apply toward the minimum requirements of the degree for which the 
student is enrolled, including hours approved for graduate credit while 
classified as a senior, imclassified undergraduate or professional 
engineering student. The first nine hours of course work taken at the 
graduate level in the PBS category will be accepted toward degree 
requirements unless a request for some other combination of nine hours is 
made by the student's advisory committee and approved both by the 
college/school dean and Graduate Dean. 

4. Tea hours of PBS credit is allowed when one course is a 4-hour lab course. 

5. The grade point average (GPA) of a graduate student who has credits in the 
PBS category will be based on all courses taken at the 400-600 
level. However, no course taken six (6) years prior to enrollment into a 
program can be used to meet the requirements for a later master's degree 
at NC State. 

6. Registration is limited to a maximum of two courses per semester, hidivid- 
uals who are employed fiill-time should limit their PBS registrations to one 
course per semester. 

7. The PBS classification carries with it no imphcation that the student will 
be admitted to the Graduate School in any degree classification. 

8. All course work accepted for degree credit must be approved by the 
student's advisory committee as being germane to the program. Requests 
for degree credit for courses completed in the PBS classification are con- 
sidered after admission to a graduate degree program when the student's 
Plan of Graduate Work is filed with the Graduate School. 

9. PBS students are expected to famiharize themselves with Graduate School 
pohcies and to seek further advice or clarification as needed. 



17 



EVENING DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Students unable to attend day classes may complete all courses required for a 
graduate degree in certain areas by enrolling in late afternoon and evening 
classes. Some of the areas available include: accounting, economics, education, 
English, industrial engineering, history, Uberal studies, life sciences, management, 
public administration, pubUc history and technical communication. Contact the 
department of interest for further information. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

Professional degree students are admitted as undergraduate students, are classified 
as "PR" students and are subject to rules and regulations as estabhshed and 
administered by the Dean of the College of Engineering. 

A professional degree student who is subsequently admitted to the Graduate School 
may, with the approval of the master's advisory committee, the major department 
and the Graduate School receive graduate credit for a maximimi of nine hours credit 
for courses in which a grade of "B" or higher was received. 

COOPERATING RALEIGH COLLEGES 

The Cooperating Raleigh Colleges (CRC) is a voluntary organization comprised of 
North Carolina State University, Meredith College, Peace College, St. Augustine's 
College, St. Mary's College and Shaw University. Graduate programs are currently 
offered only at NC State and Meredith College, but the organization provides the 
opportunity for graduate students to enroll at either institution for a course or 
courses not offered on their home campus. 

Any NC State graduate degree student who is enrolled in at least three graduate 
credit hours on the NC State campus may take a course at Meredith College during 
the fall or spring sonester, provided that (a) the course is not taught on the NC State 
can^xis and (b) the advisory committee considers the course educationally desirable. 

NC State students may not register for more than a total of two courses in any 
semester at Meredith, and no more than six of the required academic credits for a 
master's degree at NC State may be accepted from that institution. Grades from 
Meredith are not used in computing a student's NC State grade point average. 

Under this agreem^it, regular tuition and fees are paid to NC State. Certain special 
fees may be required for specific courses at Meredith, and the student is responsible 
for paying these fees. 



18 



CERTIFICATE RENEWAL 

Public school personnel who are primarily interested in "certification credit" may 
enroll in the PBS program through the Division of Lifelong Education without 
forwarding transcripts of previous work to the Graduate School. In such cases, the 
College of 

Education and Psychology will be responsible for assessing the adequacy of the 
appUcant's qualifications for enrollment in the course(s) concerned. 



Registration and Records 



The Office of Registration and Records must have authorization from the Dean of 
the Graduate School before a graduate student in any classification will be permitted 
to register for classes. This authorization will be sent to the Office of Registration 
and Records at the time the student is notified of acceptance for graduate study. All 
students attending classes must be registered for credit or audit. Grade records are 
furnished the students at the end of each scheduled school term. 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

NC State participates in an Interinstitutional Registration program with the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina at 
Gre«isboro and Duke University. Under this agreement, graduate students enrolled 
at NC State may undertake course work on these campuses upon the recommen- 
dation of their advisory committees. Courses offered by North Carolina A&T State 
University and by the University of North Carolina at Charlotte over the 
Microelectronics Center of North Carolina co mmuni cations system are also 
available through Interinstitutional Registration. 

Evai though taking a course on another campus, the graduate student is exclusively 
under the administrative direction of the NC State Graduate School. Enrollment for 
courses on other campuses will take place on this campus, using special forms 
obtained from the Department of Registration and Records. The Graduate School 
shall consider courses taken on other campuses as a part of the student's normal 
load, and the billing for such work will be through the NC State University 
Cashier's Office. During the summer the procedure is somewhat different in that a 
student must be enrolled in a least one course on the NC State campus during the 
same session as the requested interinstitutional registration. 

When the grading systan on the campus being visited is different from the NC State 
system, grades received under Interinstitutional Registration will be converted to the 
NC State systan. "H," "P," "L" and "F" grades earned at the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill and "E," "G," "S" and "F" grades earned at Duke 
University will be converted to "A," "B," "C" and "F" grades, respectively. 

19 



COURSE LOAD 

A full-time graduate course load is 9 to 15 credits per semester (including audits) 
and 3-6 credits per summer session (including audits). Audits in subjects in which 
the student has no previous experience will be evaluated at full credit value in 
detennining course load. Audits taken as repetition of work previously accomphshed 
are considered at one half of their value in calculating course loads. With the single 
exc^^on of foreign language audits, all audit registrations must fall within the range 
of maximum permissible course loads. 

Foreign students on F-1 and J-1 visas are required by the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service to carry a full-time course of study to remain in status. 

Graduate students holding assistantships are restricted to the following maximum 
semester course loads: fiill time, 3 hours; three-quarters time, 6 hours; one-half 
time, 9 hours; one-quarter time, 12 hours. External employment obUgations of 
studaits on assistantships phis their assistantship obUgations should not exceed these 
limits. Additionally, graduate assistants are limited to the following maximum totals 
of credit hours over the duration of their appointments: 

Credit 



Assistantship Classification 


Length of Appointment 


Maximum 


Hours 






Full time 


9 months 


6 


Full time 


12 months 


9 


3/4 time 


9 months 


12 


3/4 time 


12 months 


16 


1/2 time 


9 months 


18 


1/2 time 


12 months 


24 


1/4 time 


9 months 


24 


1/4 time 


12 months 


30 



Drop Dates for Minicourses 

The drop date for a five-week minicourse is the last day of the third week of the 
mini-course. The drop date for a seven-week minicourse is the last day of the fourth 
week of the minicourse. 

GRADING AND ACADEMIC STANDING 

Types of Grading Systems 

In order to receive graduate degree credit, a grade of "C-" or higher is required. To 
graduate, a student must have a minimum 3.0 average on all graduate course work 
as well as all courses on the Plan of Graduate Work. This pohcy is strictly enforced. 



20 



Performance in lecture courses is evaluated as "A+ " through "F" with a plus/minus 
designation if elected by the instructor. All grades on courses taken for graduate 
credit as an undergraduate at NC State and all grades on courses taken in a graduate 
classification at NC State in courses numbered 400 and above are included in the 
graduate grade point average. Courses at the 300 level and below are not ehgible for 
graduate credit and subsequently do not affect the graduate GPA. 

Performance in research, seminar and special problems courses is evaluated as 
either "S" (Satisfactory) or "U" (Unsatisfactory), and these grades are not used in 
computing the grade point average. However, a student who receives a "U" on any 
course will not receive credit for that course and may be required to repeat it. 

Courses regularly graded "A + " through "F" may not be taken for "S,""U" grading 
by graduate students. The "Master Listing of Approved Graduate Courses" identifies 
the approved grading for each 500- and 600-level course. Generally, courses 
numbered through the 590 series and the 690 series will receive "S" or "U" grading. 
Other course numbers usually carry letter grading. Any deviation from the approved 
grading for a f>articular course must be requested by the department and approved 
by the Graduate Dean prior to teaching the course. Also included in the GPA 
calculations and the determination of academic standing are those credits earned in 
a PBS classification which becomes a part of the Plan of Graduate Work. 

Incompletes 

At the discretion of the instructor, students may be given an "IN" (Licomplete) grade 
for work not completed because of a serious interruption in their work not caused 
by their own negligence. An "IN" must not be used, however, as a substitute for an 
"F" when the student's performance in the course is not passing. An "IN" is only 
appropriate when the student's record in the course is such that the successful 
completion of particular assignments, projects, or tests missed as a result of a 
documented serious event would enable that student to pass the course. Only work 
missed may be averaged into the grades already recorded for that student. A student 
who received as "IN" must complete the unfinished work to have the Incomplete 
converted to a final grade by the end of the next semester in which the student is 
enrolled provided that this f>eriod is not longer than 12 months from the end of the 
semester or summer session in which the Incomplete was received; otherwise, the 
"IN" will be automatically converted to "F" or "U," in accord with the grading 
approved for the particular course. All grades of "IN" must be cleared prior to 
graduation. Students must not register again for any courses in which they have 
"IN" grades; such registration does not remove "IN" grades, and the completion of 
the course on the second occasion will automatically result in an "F" for the 
incomplete course. 

Except in the case of Interinstitutional Registration (see p. 19), grades on courses 
transferred from another institution will not be included in computing the grade point 
average. 



21 



Academic Warning, Probation and Termination 

Graduate students are given a notice of academic warning if they have accumulated 
less than nine hours at the 400-level or above and have less than a 3.0 GPA. 
Graduate students are placed on academic probation if they accumulate nine or more 
but less than eighteen credit hours at the 400-level or above and have a grade jxjint 
average of less than 3.0 GPA. A student's graduate study is terminated if eighteen 
or more credit hours at the 400-level or above are accumulated with a grade point 
average of less than 3.0 GPA. In the case of program termination, no further 
registration in a graduate classifica-tion will be p>ermitted. Under extenuating 
circumstances the student will be reinstated upon the written recommendation of the 
departm^it and approval by the Graduate Dean. Departments have the prerogative 
of recommending the termination of a student's graduate admission at any time. 

Students who are ehgible to attend the first summer session are ehgible to attend 
either or both summer sessions. For example, students who receive a notice of 
"Graduate Admission Terminated" at the end of the first summer session may 
register for second summer session unless the major department recommends 
otherwise. 

Eligibility for Assistantship, Fellowship or Traineeship 

A graduate stud^it must be in good academic standing (3.0 GPA or better average) 
to be ehgible for appointment to an assistantship, fellowship or traineeship and must 
be registered in each semester in which the appointment is in effect. 

CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION 

After a student is admitted to the Graduate School and enrolls for the first time, 
she/he is rec[uired to maintain continuous registration, i.e., be enrolled each 
semester, excluding summer sessions, until she/he has either graduated or her/his 
graduate program at NC State has been terminated. All students who graduate 
during the second summer session must be registered for either the first or second 
summer session. A student in good academic standing who must interrupt her/his 
graduate program for good reasons may request a leave of absence from graduate 
study for a definite period of time, normally not to exceed one year. The request 
should be made at least one month prior to the term involved. Upon endorsement of 
the request by the student's graduate advisory committee and Director of Graduate 
Programs, and approval by the Graduate School, the student would not be required 
to be registered during the leave of absence. The time that the student spends on an 
approved leave of absence will be included in the time allowed to complete the 
degree, i.e., 6 years for master's and 10 for doctoral. Graduate students whose 
programs have been terminated because of failure to maintain continuous registration 
and who have not been granted a leave of absence during a fall or spring semester 
will be required to reapply for admission if they wish to resume their graduate 
studies at NC State. 



22 



SENIORS 

A m^nber of the senior class may, with prior approval of the Dean of the Graduate 
School, register for graduate credit in courses at the 400 and 500 levels as long as 
the combined graduate and undergraduate credit load is not more than 15 hours. 
Seniors with an accumulated grade point average of 3.2 or better in their major may 
airoll for a combined graduate and undergraduate credit load of 18 hours upon the 
recommendation of the student's advisor and approval by the department and the 
Graduate School. No more than six hours of graduate credit may be accumulated by 
a saiior, and those graduate credits may not be apphed toward the requirements for 
a baccalaureate degree. Courses at the 600 level are not ordinarily open to 
undergraduates, although occasional exceptions are made for senior honor students. 
Seniors desiring to take courses for graduate credit should contact their major 
advisers who will forward appropriate requests to the Graduate Dean for approval. 

AUDITS 

Students wishing to audit courses must have the approval of their advisers and of the 
instructors teaching the courses. While auditors receive no course credit, they are 
expected to attend class regularly. The degree to which auditors must participate in 
class beyond regular attendance is optional with the instructors; any such 
requirements should be clearly explained to the auditors in writing at the beginning 
of the semester. An instructor who feels that an auditor has failed to fulfdl the 
stipulated requirements is justified in marking "NR" (no recognition given for audit) 
on the grade report roll. 

GRADUATION 

There are three official graduations for graduate students per year, occurring at the 
end of the fall and spring semesters and at the end of the second summer session. 
Formal commencement exercises are held at the end of spring and fall semesters, 
but any student who graduated the preceding second summer session is ehgible to 
pjarticipate in the December commenc^nent. Any doctoral candidate wishing to have 
the degree conferred in absentia must notiiy the Graduate School in writing; 
master's candidates should contact their departments or programs. 

Diploma Order Request Cards 

The diploma order request card is the form used to order a diploma for a student 
anticipating graduation at the end of a particular semester or second summer session. 
The cards are normally due to the Graduate School Office by the end of the ninth 
week of classes during the fall and spring semesters and by the graduation deadline 
noted in The Calendar for the second summer session graduation. Students 
graduating in the spring are awarded their diplomas during the commencement 
exercises. In the fall those doctoral graduates attending the commencement exercises 
receive their diplomas, while the diplomas for those doctoral graduates not attending 



23 



the exercises and the master's graduates are mailed by the Department of 
Registration and Records. The diplomas for those students graduating at the end of 
second summer session and those not attending a formal commencement exercise are 
mailed by Registration and Records which is also responsible for the ordering of 
diplomas. 

Students earning a Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Education or 
Doctor of Philosophy degree will receive diplomas designating the degree but not 
the program of study. Students earning master's degrees in a designated field will 
receive diplomas indicating the field of specialization, i.e., Master of Forestry. 
Students with co-majors will have those identified on their transcripts but not on 
their diplomas. 



Tuition and Fees 

A statemeat of tuition and fees is mailed to each preregistered student approximately 
five weeks before the beginning of any term. The statement must be returned with 
full payment or complete financial assistance information by the due date appearing 
on the staiecaeat. Normally the due date is approximately two weeks before classes 
begin. Non-preregistered students are required to pay their tuition and fees before 
registering. 



SFAiF<sTF1l RATF SrHFDTTT.F-IQQS-Qfi ArADFAnr VFAR 
(ALL RATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE) 



RESroENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA* NONRESIDENTS** 

Tuition and Tuition and 

Hours Fees Fees 

0-Thesis $277 $ 854 

0-2 251 1,265 

3-5 369 2,348 

6-8 620 3,663 

9 869 4,927 



24 



STTMMFR SFSSTON BATF. SrHFDTTT.F-IQQfi 
RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA NONRESIDENTS 

Tuition and Tuition and 

Hours Fees Fees 

0-Thesis $196 $ 503 

1 217 626 

2 293 956 

3 328 1,286 

4 384 1,617 

5 440 1,947 

6 495 2,277 

7 551 2,607 

8 607 2,938 

9 662 3,268 

10 718 3,598 

11 774 

12 830 

13 885 

(*For definition of in-state and out-of-state rates, see pp. 27-30. **Under certain 
conditions, nonresident students who have been offered an assistantship, traineeship 
or fellowship may be eligible for reduced tuition rates; see tuition remission on p. 
26.) 

O-Thesis Courses: The following GR courses are assessed the 0-Thesis rate: 

GR 596S Master's Summer Research 

GR 597 Master's Examination Only 

GR 598 Master's Thesis Preparation 

GR 695 Doctoral Preliminary Examination Only 

GR 696S Doctoral Summer Research 

GR 697 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

GR 698 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation 

Audits: During semester when registered and paying for other course work: One 
audit free, each additional audit same cost as for credit; 
During s^nester when not registered for other course work: Same cost as 
for credit; 
During any summer session: Same cost as for credit. 

Full-time Faculty or Staff: $ 7 

Microfilming Doctoral Dissertation: $57 



25 



FULL-TIME FACULTY AND EMPLOYEES 

Full-time faculty of instructor rank and above and other full-time employees of the 
University ^\i^o hold monbership in the Teachers' and State Employees' Retirement 
System may register for credit or as auditors with free tuition privileges for one 
course in any academic term at any campus of the University of North Carolina. 
Free tuition privileges do not apply during the summer. Each appUcant for free 
tuition must submit through regular channels a form provided by the University. 

TUITION REMISSION 

Unless tuition is expressly provided by the terms of an assistantship or fellowship, 
a recipient must pay tuition at the rate determined by his or her residence status. 
However, a nonresident graduate student awarded an assistantship or a fellowship 
may be eUgible for a reduced tuition rate (tutition remission) comparable to the in- 
state rate. Further information may be obtained by contacting the department of 
major interest. 

If a student has been granted tuition remission and that student terminated his/her 
program or goes off the assistantship which provided him/her with entitlement to 
tuition remission, the student will be billed for the remainder of the out-of-state 
tuition by the University Cashier's Office. 

REFUND POUCY 

Refunds for official withdrawals from NC State are prorated, based upon the 
percentage of the enrollment period attended. No refunds are made for official 
withdrawals after 50% of the enroUmemt j)eriod. The prorated withdrawal schedule 
will be pubUcized through university media after it is established. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Cooperative Education Program (co-op) is designed to enhance the quahty of 
instruction and learning by providing interested, qualified gradute students a broader 
understanding of their fields of study and their apphcabihty to the world of work. 
Over 500 partners in industry, business and government request graduate students 
for their co-op p)ositions primarily on a full-time basis. Job offers are made by the 
employer based on student qualifications. Employer needs are a reflection of the 
labor maiicet. Work assignments are supervised by the employer and monitored by 
the co-op program staff. On average, 75 graduate students are at work each semester 
and earn an average of $16.50 per hour. Co-op participants must enroll each term 
of employment at a cost of $316 in 1996-97. 

For admission to the program, students must meet the following criteria: 

♦ Full-time enrollment at NC State immediately prior to the first work session. 



26 



♦ Presentation of an NC State transcript when applying for the program. 

♦ A minimum grade point average of 3.0. 

♦ Attendance at a co-op orientation session. 

♦ Written approval of the graduate advisor or Director of Graduate Programs. 

♦ An interview with the Cooperative Education Director or Coordinator. 

International students must also meet visa regulations pertaining to curricular 
practical training. Further information is provided at orientation sessions. Call 515- 
4427 for a schedule. 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

The basis for determining the q^jropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a student 
is a resident or a nonresident for tuition purposes. Each student must make a 
statan^it as to the length of his or her residence in North Carolina with assessment 
by the institution of that statement to be conditioned by the following: 

Residence—To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become a 
legal resident and remain a legal resident for at least twelve months immediately 
prior to classification. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence and 
residence for tuition purposes. Furthermore, twelve months' legal residence means 
more than simple abode in North Carolina. In particular, it means maintaining a 
domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) as opposed to "maintaining a mere 
temporary residence or abode incident to enrollment in an institution of higher 
education. " The burden of establishing facts which justify classification of a student 
as a resident entitled to in-state tuition rates is on the appUcant for each 
classification, who must show his or her entitlement by the preponderance (the 
greater part) of the residentiary information. 

/nirio/iv^—Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the 
student's seeking such status and providing all information that the institution may 
require in making the determination. 

i'arenXy'Do/mdfe-If an individual, irrespective of age, has living parent(s) or court- 
appointed guardian of the person, the domicile of such parent(s) or guardian is, 
prima facie, the domicile of the individual; but this prima facie evidence of the 
individual's domicile may or may not be sustained by other information. Further, 
noodomiciliary status of parents is not deemed prima facie evidence of the apphcant 
child's status if the appUcant has Uved (though not necessarily legally resided) in 
North Carolina for the five years preceding enrollment or re-registration. 

Effect of Marriage--MaTnagG alone does not prevent a p>erson from becoming or 
continuing to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor does marriage in any 
circumstance insure that a person will become or continue to be a resident for tuition 
purposes. Marriage and the legal residence of one's spouse are, however, relevant 



27 



infoimadon in determining residentiary intent. Furthermore, if both a husband and 
his wife are legal residents of North Carolina and if one of them has been a legal 
resident longer than the other, then the longer duration may be claimed by either 
spouse in meeting the twelve-month requirement for in-state tuition status. 

Military Personnel—A North Carolinian who serves outside the State in the armed 
forces does not lose North Carolina domicile simply by reason of such service. 
Students from the mihtary may prove retention or estabUshment of residence by 
reference, as in other cases, to residentiary acts accompanied by residentiary intent. 

In addition, a separate North Carolina statute affords tuition rate benefits to certain 
military personnel and their dependents even though not qualifying for the in-state 
tuition rate by reason of twelve months' legal residence in North Carolina. Members 
of the armed services, while stationed in and concurrently hving in North Carolina, 
may be charged a tuition rate lower than the out-of-state tuition rate to the extent that 
the total of entitlements for apphcable tuition costs available from the federal 
government, phis certain amoimts based imder a statutory formula upon the in-state 
tuition rate, is a sum less than the out-of-state tuition rate for the pertinent 
enrollment. A dependent relative of a service member stationed in North Carolina 
is eligible to be charged the in-state tuition rate while the dependent relative is hving 
in North Carolina with the service member and if the dependent relative has met any 
requirement of the Selective Service System apphcable to the dependent 
relative. These tuition benefits may be enjoyed only if the apphcable requirements 
for admission have been met; these benefits alone do not provide the basis for 
receiving those derivative benefits under the provisions of the residence 
classification statute reviewed elsewhere in this summary. 

Grace Period—If a person (1) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has conse- 
quoitly been classified a resident for tuition purposes and (3) has subsequently lost 
North Carolina legal residence while enrolled at a pubhc institution of higher 
education, that person may continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for a grace 
period of twelve months measured from the date on which North Carolina legal 
residaice was lost. If the twelve months end during an academic term for which the 
person is airolled at a State institution of higher education, the grace period extends, 
in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one who continues 
domiciled outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of legal residence, 
marking the beginning of the grace period. 

Minors— Minors (persons under 18 years of age) usually have the domicile of their 
parents, but certain special cases are recognized by the residence classification 
statute in determining residence for tuition purposes. 

(a) If a minor's parents hve apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North 
Carolina for the time period(s) that either parent, as a North Carolina legal resident, 
may claim and does claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other law or judicial 
act assigns the minor's domicile outside North Carolina. A minor thus deemed to be 



28 



a legal resident will not, upon achieving majority before enrolling at an institution 
of higher education, lose North Carolina legal residence if that person (1) upon 
becoming an adult "acts, to the extent that the person's degree of actual 
onancipation permits, in a manner consistent with bona fide legal residence in North 
Carolina" and (2) "begins enrollment at an institution of higher education not later 
than the fall academic term next following completion of education prerequisite to 
admission at such institution. " 

(b) If a minor has hved for five or more consecutive years with relatives (other 
than p)arents) who are domiciled in North Carolina and if the relatives have 
functioned during this time as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be 
deemed a resident for tuition purposes for an enrolled term commencing immediately 
after at least five years in which these circumstances have existed. If under this 
consideration a minor is deemed to be a resident for tuition purposes immediately 
prior to his or her eighteenth birthday, that person on achieving majority will be 
denned a legal resident of North Carolina of at least twelve months' duration. This 
provision acts to confer in-state tuition status even in the face of other provisions of 
law to the contrary; however, a person deemed a resident of twelve months' duration 
pursuant to this provision continues to be a legal resident of the State only so long 
as he or she does not abandon North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile— If a student ceases eiu-oUment at or graduates from an 
institution of higher education while classified a resident for tuition purposes and 
then both abandons and reacquires North Carolina domicile within a 12-month 
period, that person, if he or she continues to maintain the reacquired domicile into 
re-enrollment at an institution of higher education, may re-enroll at the in-state 
tuition rate without having to meet the usual 12-month durational requirement. 
However, any one person may receive the benefit of this provision only once. 

Change of Status— A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or 
permitted to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program which 
involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) must be classified by the admitting 
institution either as a residait or as a non-resident for tuition purposes prior to actual 
enrollment. A residence status classification once assigned (and finalized pursuant 
to any appeal properly taken) may be changed thereafter (with corresponding change 
in billing rates) only at intervals corresponding with the estabhshed primary 
divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students— When a student transfers from one North Carolina pubhc 
institution of higher education to another, he or she is treated as a new student by 
the institution to which he or she is transferring and must be assigned an initial 
residence status classification for tuition purposes. 

Prevailing North Carolina Law—General Statute (G.S.) 116-143.1 is the prevailing 
statute governing residence status classification. A copy of the applicable law and/or 
implementing regulations is available for inspection in the Office of Graduate 



29 



Admissions, 103 Peele Hall. Residence-and-Tuition Status Applications are also 
available in the same office and questions should be directed to that office. 



Financial Support for Graduate Students 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate students may receive financial support through fellowships, traineeships 
and teaching or research assistantships sponsored by federal, state and private 
agencies. Prospective students may request consideration for financial assistance by 
completing the appropriate sections of the admissions appUcation form. Apphcants 
for these awards should correspond directly with the department of major interest 
concerning the availabihty of awards and related information. Enrolled students 
should contact the major dej)artment. Prosf>ective and enrolled graduate students are 
Micouraged to apply for national, regional and foundation fellowships in addition to 
awards sponsored through the University. Information on how to apply for this type 
of financial assistance is available in the Graduate School. Enrolled or prospective 
students may also consult the Financial Aid Office for information on federal loan 
programs. 

Unless tuition is expressly provided by the terms of the award, an award recipient 
must pay tuition at the rate determined by his or her residence status. However, a 
nonresident graduate student awarded an assistantship or a fellowship may be 
eligible for a reduced tuition rate con:q>arable to the in-state rate. Further information 
may be obtained by contacting the department of major interest. 

A graduate studait must be in good academic standing (3.0 GPA or better average) 
to be eligible for appointment to an assistantship, fellowship or traineeship and must 
be registered in each semester in which the appointment is in effect. This also means 
that if an assistantship holder covered by tuition remission terminates his/her studies 
after the last day to withdraw from the University or to drop a course with a refund 
(approximately s&vea days after classes commence), that student will be responsible 
for the prorated part of tuition and fees. 

RESEARCH AND TEACHING ASSIST ANTSHffS 

The University offers approximately 2,100 assistantships each year. Stipend rates 
for teaching and research assistantships are competitive with other universities. For 
fixrther information on the availability of assistantships, appUcants should contact the 
program area of interest. 



30 



DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS 

Some departments or programs offer fellowships. Students are nominated for these 
fellowships by their departments or programs with selection being made by faculty 
committees or by the Graduate School. For additional information concerning such 
fellowships, the apphcant should contact the appropriate college, department or 
program. Examples of such fellowships are listed below: 

PHY Training Grant, USDA National Needs Fellowship, Biotechnology 
Fellowship and Purina Mills Research Fellowship, all through the College 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Dairyman Lie. Fellowship in the 
Department of Animal Science; Pioneer Hybred hitemational in the 
Departm^it of Crop Science; Chemical hidustries Listitute for Toxicology 
through the Toxicology Program; Fellowship through the Department of 
Plant Pathology; E. G. Moss and R. J. Reynolds Fellowships through the 
N. C. Agricultural Research Service in the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences; Harkema Fellowship in the Department of Zoology; NASA 
Traineeship, Eastman Scholarship and ARO Fellowships in the Department 
of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Nuclear Energy Fellow ship. 
Fusion Technology Fellowship and Murray Fellowship through the 
Department of Nuclear Engineering; Dupont Manufacturing Systems 
Fellowship through the hitegrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering 
Institute; Kimley-Hom Graduate Scholarship and Carolina Asphalt 
Association, Inc., through the Department of Civil Engineering; ECE 
Levels 1, 11 and III Supplementary Fellowships, IBM Graduate Fellowship 
(soUd state electronics), IBM Graduate Fellowship in Manufacturing 
Research, IBM Graduate Fellowship in Computer Networking and Dupont 
Graduate Fellowships through the Department of Electrical and Computer 
Engineering; Dupont Fellowship in Chemical Engineering, PhiUips 
Graduate Fellowship, Southeastern Regional and PIA Supplemental 
Fellowship in the Department of Chemical Engineering; Dean's 
Fellowships in the College of Engineering, Microelectronics Center of 
N.C. and National Consortium for Minorities in Engineering (GEM), all 
through the College of Engineering; SOHIO Fellowship in the Department 
of Physics; Gertrude M. Cox Fellowship in the Department of Statistics; 
Mary Lee and Luther Bamhardt Scholarship in the Depart ment of History; 
Title IX Fellowship in the Department of Pohtical Science and Pubhc 
Administration; H. W. Close Fellowship through the College of Textiles. 

NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIPS 

These awards are made to an iikdividual rather than to the University. Recipients are 
chosen through competitions expressive of the terms of each award. Examples of 
these awards held by currently enrolled graduate students follow: 



31 



National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship 

Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship for Minorities 

DepartmCTJt of Defense National Defense Sciaice and Engineering Graduate Fellow- 
ship (DOD NDSEG) 

Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship 

NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program - Underrepresented Minority Focus 
Award 

National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering Inc. 
(GEM) Fellowship 

National Physical Science Consortium: Graduate Fellowships for Minorities and 
Women in the Physical Sciences 

Applications and/or information on the above fellowship programs are available in 
the Graduate School. 

Graduate School Fellowships 

The Afriran-Ampriran OraHiiafp As^sisfance Grant (AAGAG) is a grantsmanship 
program created by NC State to aid in the support of African-American graduate 
students in all graduate programs of the University. 

The AAGAG program provides stipends on a financial need basis up to $5,000 for 
the academic year. Recipiaits must be full-time, new or continuing students pursuing 
master's or doctoral degrees at NC State. The Graduate School should be contacted 
for further information. 

Alumni Assnciafinn Orariiiatp Fpllnwship Supplements are funded by the NC 
State Alumni Association each year in an effort to recruit outstanding graduate 
students, with the highly competitive award process being coordinated through the 
Graduate School office. For the 1995-96 academic year twenty-six Graduate 
Fellowship Supplements were funded; twenty-four of these were awarded across 
canqxis and two were awarded to support the management of University Archives. 
These supplanaits are awarded on a one-time-only basis as a financial incentive and 
beyond whatever fellowship or assistantship may be offered. In addition, two Alumni 
Association Graduate International Fellowships are awarded through the 
International Student Office. 

GraHnate Aftsistanre in Areas nf National Need! The U.S. Department of 
Education provides support to expedite completion of the doctoral degree for 
graduate students committed to a career of teaching and research in an identified 
area of national need. In addition to an annual stipend of up to $14,400 depending 
on financial need, the program reimburses educational expenses. To date, NC State 
has awarded 126 fellowships to graduate students studying electronic materials, 
biotechnology and scientific computation. Information is available in the Graduate 
School. 



32 



Tncpnrive .Schnlflrship and Grant Program for Nafive Amerirans (TSCPNA) ; The 

General Assembly of North Carolina has provided funds for doctoral fellowships 
under the ISGPNA Program for a number of grants to American Lxlian students 
interested in pursuing doctoral degrees at NC State. The fellowships have a 
maximum value of $5,000 annually. 

To be eligible for a fellowship, interested students must be enrolled full-time and in 
good standing in a doctoral degree program, meet state residency requirements, have 
financial need and be an American Indian under the program's definition. This 
definition states that an ehgible individiial is one who maintains cultural 
identification as an American hidian through membership in an hidian tribe 
recognized by the State of North Carolina or by the federal government or through 
other tribal afflhation or commimity recognition. 

The Jerry J. Collier Sc.hnlarship provides support to an NC State alumnus(a) who 
participated in a varsity sport during his/her undergraduate tenure and who is enter- 
ing a graduate program at NC State. The criteria for selection include academic 
credentials and statement of goals and objectives. The scholarship is $2,000 for the 
academic year and is renewable. Information is available in the Graduate School. 

Minority Pre.senc.e Grant Program: Under the Board of Governors general 
Minority Presence Grant Program, African- American students may be ehgible for 
special financial assistance if they are residents of North Carolina, em-olled full-time 
and demonstrate financial need. 

The Minority Presence Grant Program for Doctoral Study, Law and Veterinary 
Medicine provides stipends of up to $4,000 for the academic year, with an option 
of $500 in additional support for study in the summer sessions, for African- 
American residents of North Carolina who are selected to participate. Recipients 
must be full-time students pursuing doctoral degrees, law degrees or degrees in 
veterinary medicine at East Carolina University, NC State, University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill or The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

National Science Fniindatinn (NSF) Cradnafp Pp,<;parrh Traineeships provide 
support to increase the number of talented undergraduates enrolling in doctoral 
programs in critical and emerging areas of science, mathematics and engineering. 
Since 1994, NC State has be^i awarded 10 traineeships to support doctoral students 
studying either scientific computation or instructional technology for science 
education. In addition to an annual stipend of $14,100, the program reimburses 
educational expenses. Information is avail-able in the Graduate School. 

Patricia Pohprts Harris Graduate Fp llowships provide funds for minority or 
womai graduate students who demonstrate financial need and who plan to enroll in 
programs where such students are traditionally underrepresented nationally. 
Currently, fellowships are offered in engineering, physics, biochemistry, animal 



33 



sciaice, botany, gaieties and counselor education. Thirteen fellowships, each in the 
amount of up to $14,4(X)/year, were awarded through the Graduate School in 1993- 
94. Tuition and fees are also paid. Lifonnation pertaining to the fellowships is 
available in the Graduate School. 

Other Financial Aid 
LONG-TERM LOANS 

Graduate students who are American citizens or eUgible noncitizens may apply for 
long-term, low interest loans through the Financial Aid Office. To qualify for loans, 
studaats must be making satisfactory academic progress towards a degree and must 
complete the appropriate appUcation materials to demonstrate that all federal 
ehgbility requirements for loan consideration have been met. The Free Application 
for Federal Student Aid is the form required by NC State to document eUgibihty for 
federal loan assistance, hi addition, students must complete the university's 
Institutional Application and have a Financial Aid Transcript sent to the NC State 
Financial Aid Office from every institution previously attended (regardless of 
whether aid was ^>phed for or received at those institutions). Although students are 
expected to apply for and to accept any available assistantships or fellowships 
provided by the Graduate School, it is recommended that students not wait for these 
decisions to be made before applying for financial aid through the Financial Aid 
Office. If graduate assistantships or fellowships are offered, and borrowing no 
longer becomes necessary, students have the option to cancel their requests for loan 
assistance at any point. 

Federal Stafford Loans (Subsidized and Unsubsidized): Funding for these loans is 
provided by private lenders. Since they are partially supported by the federal 
government, however, students must follow federal guidelines in applying for aid 
to qualify. Information on specific appUcation procedures, loan maximums, interest 
rates and participating lenders may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office. 
Students who apply for these loans and demonstrate need by federal definition 
qualify for Subsidized Stafford Loans, meaning that the federal government pays the 
interest on the loan while the student is enrolled on at least a half-time basis. If no 
need is demonstrated, students may still borrow to meet the cost of education (minus 
other resources, such as scholarships, fellowships and tuition remissions) through 
the Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Program. Students who receive unsubsidized loans 
are charged interest while enrolled, although they may elect to capitalize interest 
payments to repay with principal upon completion of degree. For both subsidized 
and unsubsidized loans, repayment of principal is deferred until completion of the 
degree or until termination of at least half-time enrollment status. 

Other Loan Options: Because of limited institutional funds, graduate students 
generally are expected to apply for the maximum Federal Subsidized and 
Unsubsidized Stafford Loans for which they are ehgible if funding is needed to assist 

34 



with educational expenses. Students who need to borrow more than the maximum 
amounts p>ossible through those loan programs (the combined annual maximum is 
$18,500) will be considered for other loan funds administered by the Financial Aid 
Office if sufficient fiinding is available. 

WORK-STUDY JOBS 

The Federal Work-Study Program is a federal program designed to provide part-time 
jobs to students who apply for financial aid using the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid and who document need by federal guidelines. Effort is made to assign 
students to jobs with their special interests and skills. Most of the jobs are on- 
canqxis, but limited opportunities for off-campus employment in community service 
areas are also available. 

PART-TIME JOBS 

Other jobs not based on need are hsted at the Financial Aid Office and are open to 
all students. 

SHORT-TERM EMERGENCY LOANS 

Loans, usually in amounts of $100 or less, to meet emergency expenses may be ob- 
tained on short notice (generally on the day of appUcation) at the Financial Aid 
Office. These loans, in that they are designed for short-term, emergency use, must 
be rq^aid within about 30 days. A loan may not be taken out between semesters or 
between simimer sessions. 

Military Education and Training 

The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) selects interested University students 
for enrolknent in Army ROTC (AROTC) or in Air Force ROTC (AFROTC) for 
officer education and training leading toward a commission. 

The Army and Air Force ROTC departments educate and train University students, 
graduate and undergraduate, for a commission in their respective mihtary ser- 
vices. These students must have four full semesters (undergraduate or graduate) 
remaining at the time they enter the ROTC Program (exceptions for Army ROTC 
are noted below). Uniforms and books for ROTC are provided. Transfer credit is 
allowed for previous ROTC course work at other institutions. 

Graduate students who will be at NC State for at least two years may, upon 
successful completion of a six- weeks' summer leadership training period, be 
oirolled in the ROTC Program. Entry requirements for the i\ROTC program may 
also be met by having met any one of the following requirements: 



35 



1. Completed basic level ROTC courses as an undergraduate. 
2 Be an honorably discharged veteran. 

3. Have completed mihtary basic training and be a member of a Reserve 
Component Unit of any branch of the Armed Forces or National Guard. 

Air Force ROTC offers a Fhght Screening Program for selected cadets which is 
conducted by an Air Force flying school in Texas during the summer at no expense 
to the student. Students successfully completing ROTC fhght screening may be 
selected for further fhght training as an Air Force pilot. 

Graduate studaits airolled in the junior and senior years of ROTC receive $150 per 
month. Scholarships which pay all tuition, fees and costs of required text books in 
addition to the $150 per month are available on a competitive basis. 

Special provisions for veterans are made in Army ROTC whereby they are granted 
placem«:tf credit for their prior service experience and training. Additionally, Army 
ROTC offers the student several points of entry into the ROTC Program, through 
ROTC placement credit for college courses or other worthwhile experiences that 
contribute to the requisite skills of a second heutenant. Army ROTC counselors are 
available to evaluate the students' prior learning experiences and advise them as to 
where they can be placed in ROTC. Under the Army's Simultaneous Membership 
Program, the graduate student may participate in the Army Reserve or National 
Guard and receive approximately $151 per month in addition to the $150 monthly 
stipend. The National Guard provides up to $1,000 tuition costs per year for its 
members. 

Additional information on Army ROTC may be obtained from the Professor of 
Mihtary Sciaice, Room 154, Reynolds Cohseum (515-2428) and Air Force ROTC 
from the Professor of Aerospace Studies, Room 145, Reynolds Cohseum (515- 
2417). 

Health Services 

The Student Health Service, located in Clark Hall, offers health care to students in 
a campus facihty staffed by seven full-time physicians, five Nurse Practitioners, a 
[^larmacist, laboratory technicians, registered nurses, health educators and support 
staff. 

During fall and spring semester, the Health Service is open 8:00 a.m. to 1 1:00 p.m. 
Monday-Friday and 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. weekends (except during hohdays and 
breaks). Appointments are needed to see a health care provider and may be made 
in person at the Health Service or by calling 515-7107 (8:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m.). 
Gynecology appointments are made at 515-7762. Urgent medical problems will be 
seen at the clinic without appointment. Physicians maintain office hours Monday 



36 



through Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:l5 p.m. During summer sessions, Student Health 
Service is open Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

All currently oirolled students are eligible for medical care. The pre-paid health fee 
covers professional services such as nurse and M.D. visits, laboratory tests, cold 
medications and health education. There is a nominal charge for x-rays, 
jjrescriptions and sf>ecialty clinics. Students are resjx)nsible for all services received 
off-campus, e.g., off-campus M.D., hospital or lab/x-ray. 

HEALTH INSURANCE 

NC State strongly encourages each student to have accident and sickness insurance 
protection, either by their parents' group poUcy or under the NC State Student 
Insurance Plan. The policy offered by the University helps cover the cost of referrals 
to off-campus speciahsts or to hospitals for serious illnesses. For your protection, 
do not be uninsured! hitemational students are required to have health insurance. 

A brochure describing the NC State student plan is mailed to all students in July. 
Call (919) 515-2563 for additional information. 

Housing 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

The Housing Assignments Office maintains hstings of off-campus housing 
accommodations provided by private landlords and students seeking roommates; 
however, arrangements for off'-campus housing must be made by students seeking 
accommodations. The hstings change frequently, and most landlords and tenants 
prefer to complete the rental transaction in person rather than by telephone or 
mail. The Housing Assignments Office, 1112 Pullen Hall, is open from 7:30 
a.m. imtil 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

EDWARD S. KING VILLAGE 

The University also maintaias 296 apartments in E. S. King Village for students with 
families, for single parents and graduate students. Rental rates are far below market 
value. (Specific rates for studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments) can be obtained 
by calliig (919) 515-2430. The E. S. King fax number is (919) 515-7613. E. S. King 
Home Page resides at http:\\www2. ncsu.edu\ncsu\housing\eskv\eskv.html on the 
Internet. 

ON-CAMPUS HOUSING 

The University furnishes housing for approximately 7,100 students. The residence 
halls are grouped in three areas: East, Central and West Campus. Each of the areas 

37 



provides laundry facilities, convenience stores, computer labs, grassy areas for 
sports and more. 

The 1996-97 rental fee for a basic residence hall double room is $925 per student 
per s^nester (the premium hall rate is $1,210 per student per semester), subject to 
change on an annual basis. For more information about amenities and/or availabihty, 
call the Housing Assisgments Office at (919) 515-2440. The Housing and Residence 
Life fax number is (919) 515-3542. The Housing and Residence Life Home Page 
resides at http:\\www2.ncsu.edu\ncsu\housing on the Internet. 



38 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The Graduate School offers programs of study leading to the master's degree in 86 
fields and the doctorate in 52. Each student's program is planned with an advisory 
committee of graduate faculty members to provide the opportunity for gaining advanced 
knowledge in the particular field of study. Graduate education is the fmal stage in the 
developraient of intellectual independence. It is different from undergraduate education 
in that the student is ^icouraged to establish premises, to hypothesize and to defend both 
the procedure and the conclusions of independent investigation. The burden of proof for 
the veriiiability of knowledge rests on the student, not on the faculty member. Emphasis 
is placed upon the student's scholarly development through formal course work, 
seminars, research and independent investigation. 

Graduate students are expected to familiarize themselves with the requirements for the 
degrees for which they are candidates and are held responsible for the fulfillment of 
these requirements. 

Master's Degrees 

The Graduate School offers programs of study leading to the Master of Science degree, 
the Master of Arts degree and the Master's degree in certain designated fields. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE AND MASTER OF ARTS 

For all Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees, the programs are planned with 
the objective of making possible a reasonable, comprehensive mastery of the subject 
matter in a chosen field, hi most cases, the Master of Science and Master of Arts 
programs provide training and experience in research in order to famiharize the student 
with the methods, ideals and goals of indep>endent investigation. Li these cases, 
r^>resaitative of most Master of Science and Master of Arts degree programs, a thesis 
is required. A small number of Master of Science and Master of programs do not 
require a thesis. 

MASTER'S DEGREE IN A DESIGNATED FIELD 

A number of departments and programs offer master's degrees in designated fields. 
These are professional degrees and do not require a thesis. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTERS DEGREES 

All departmaits and programs offering master's degrees may choose to offer the degree 

39 



as an "Option B" program which has a different set of requirements from regular 
master's programs. A small number of departments and programs have chosen Option 
B. These programs will be identified in the section of this catalog titled "Fields of 
Listruction. " Differences between the requirements of regular programs vs. Option B 
programs, where appropriate, are identified below. 

GRADUATE ADVISOR AND GRADUATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

All studaits in master's programs must have a graduate advisor who is a member of the 
Graduate Faculty in the student's major department or program. The graduate advisor 
is appointed by the Director of Graduate Programs. In addition, all students, except 
those in Option B programs, must have a graduate advisory committee. The advisory 
committee is composed of at least three members of the Graduate Faculty. The graduate 
advisor serves as chair or co-chair of the committee. If the student has a minor, then one 
of the committee members must be from the minor department or program. The 
graduate advisory committee is appointed by the Director of Graduate Programs in the 
stud^it's depaitmeot or program. At the time of the request for a permit to schedule the 
final oral examination, the Graduate School verifies that the committee is constituted 
properly. 

PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

The studait's program of study is planned so as to provide a comprehensive view of the 
major field of interest and in related areas of knowledge, sometime constituting a minor. 
As great a latitude is permitted in the selection of courses as is compatible with the well- 
defined major and, in many cases, supporting courses or a minor. In general, it is 
expected that at least two-thirds of the credits will be in the major. If there are credits 
in a minor or supporting areas, they normally would not exceed one-third of the total. 
Since there are many possible combinations of course work, a specific Plan of Graduate 
Work is developed by the advisory committee with the student. The course work to be 
taken by the student and the thesis topic, where apphcable, must be approved by the 
student's advisory committee and the Director of Graduate Programs in the student's 
department or program. This should be done prior to completion of one-half of the 
credits on the plan. 

CREDITS 

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for all master's degrees; however, 
many programs require more than thirty. Also, many students, in order to gain the 
breadth desired in their program or to make up deficits in their undergraduate degree, 
will actually take more credit hours than the minimu m required by the program. At least 
20 sanester hours must come fixjm 500- and 600-level courses. No more than two credit 
hours of departmental seminar may be included in the minimum 30-credit program. 
Programs that require a thesis may include no more than six hours of research credit 

40 



(699) in the minimum 30- credit-hour program. Research credit is not appropriate in the 
non-thesis programs. Non-thesis programs may include no more than six hours of 
indq^^xlent study credits in the minimum 30-credit program. Courses at the 400 level 
counted toward the minimal 30-hour requirement may not come from the major field. 

Transfer credit: No more than six of the minimal 30-hour requirement will be accepted 
from other institutions. A graduate course which has been completed with a grade of 
"B" or better may be considered for transfer to a master's program provided that it has 
been completed in a graduate or post-baccalaureate classification at an accredited 
graduate school. Exceptions are allowed for transfer from foreign institutions if the 
department or program provides the Graduate School with adequate documentation that 
the course is relevant to the degree with appropriate content and level of instruction 
resulting in student competencies at least comparable to those of students taking the 
equivalent course at NC State and that the course was taught by faculty who are 
qualified to teach at the master's degree level. Transfer credit may not be used to fill the 
20-hour 500- and 600-level requirement. Credit accepted by extension reduces the 
amoimt of credit that may be transferred from other instititions. 

Transfer of Undergraduate Credit: Graduate credit may be allowed for up to 6 hours 
of the minimal 30-hour requirement for courses taken at NC State provided that it is at 
the 400 level or higher, that the grade is "B" or better, that it was not counted to fulfill 
undergraduate requirranents, and that it is recommended by the student's undergraduate 
advisor prior to earoUmeat in the course. No graduate credit will be allowed for excess 
credits completed in an undergraduate classification at another institution. 

Credit by Extension: A maximum of six semester credits taken prior to admission to 
a graduate program and earned through NC State exteasion study may be applied toward 
the minimal 30-hour requiranent provided that the courses are graduate-level and taught 
by members of the NC State Graduate Faculty. If a student has been admitted to the 
Graduate School, six additional semester credits earned through NC State extension 
study may be used to meet the minimal 30-hour requirement. No graduate credit will be 
allowed for courses completed by extension at universities other than NC State. Credit 
accepbed by extension reduces the amount of credit that may be transferred from other 
instititions. 

Credit by Examination: Credit by examination in graduate courses may be awarded 
for up to six credit hours. Passage of the examination entitles the student to credit only 
for the course; letter grades are not allowed for credit by examination. Credit by 
examination may not be obtained for research, seminars, project courses or audits. 
Residency requirements are not fulfilled by courses in which credit is awarded by 
examination. Credit by examination is permitted when all of the following conditions 
exist: a course required on the Plan of Graduate Work is not taught within time periods 
indicated by the Graduate Catalog or in time periods limited by agreements with outside 
agencies; the student requesting the examination has not previously registered for the 

41 



course, either for credit or audit; the academic standards for credit by examination are 
commensurate with the academic standards for the course; the examination for credit 
is approved by the Director of Graduate Programs and the examination is prepared by 
and supervised by ^propriate faculty; credit is to be given only when the performance 
is judged to be equivalent to a "B" grade or higher; only one examination for credit is 
to be permitted for the same course; the request for credit by examination is approved 
by the Graduate School. 

Credits fi-om Previous NC State Master's Degree: Only six credits from a previous 
NC State master's degree may be covmted toward the minimal 30-hour requirement. 

Second Master's in the Same Field: The Graduate School will not admit or transfer 
a student to a master's program if he/she holds a master's degree in the same discipline 
without a statement of justification by the student's Director of Graduate Programs. 

MINOR 

The Graduate School does not require a minor; however, individual departments and 
programs may require a minor. All students, except those in Option B programs, have 
the option of selecting a minor. In most cases, the minor will be in a single department 
or program. Li some cases, an interdisciplinary minor, consisting of related credits from 
more than one department or program, will be selected. When a student does select a 
minor, the minor credits on the Plan of Graduate Work must be approved by the 
graduate advisory committee member, and, in some cases, the Director of Graduate 
Programs, from the minor department or program. 

CO-MAJOR 

Students may co-major at the master's level with the approval of both departments 
aad/or programs and appropriate representation on the advisory committee. Co-majors 
must be within the same degree area, i.e. , Master of Science and Master of Science, 
Master of Arts and Master of Arts, Master's degree in a designated field and Master's 
degree in a designated field. Co-majors must meet all requirements of both departments 
and/or programs. On degree is awarded, and the co-major is noted on the transcript. 
Enrolled co-majors will be classified in one program for record purposes. 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A reading knowledge of one foreign language (Germanic, Romance or Slavic) is 
required by some programs for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees. 
Other departments may designate that the language requirement be filled from among 
those languages in which the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures conducts 
testing. Students should contact the major department for specific language 
requirements. 

42 



Proficiency can be demonstrated in one of two ways: 

1. By passing a traditional reading knowledge examination, which can be 
requested by the student at any time from the Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures. 

2. By passing the final examination in a course especially designed for graduate 
studaits who have no previous knowledge of a foreign language or who wish 
to refresh their knowledge of a language. The Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures offers such courses, normally in the fall, for each of the 
three major foreign languages: French (FLF 401), German (FLG 401) and 
Spanish (FLS 401). These courses concentrate exclusively on teaching students 
to uiKlerstand the written word and do not provide instruction or testing in 
speaking and original composition. Failure to pass the course carries with it no 
paialty other than the fact that the student's language requirement will remain 
unfulfilled. These courses are neither counted for credit nor used in computing 
the grade point average. 

THESIS 

Theses prepared by candidates for the Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees, 
in programs requiring the thesis, must present an original investigation into a subject 
which has been approved by the student's advisory committee and the Director of 
Graduate Programs in the student's major. Three copies of the thesis in final form as 
approved by the advisory committee, each signed by the members of the advisory 
committee, must be submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline in the 
s«nester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. Detailed information 
on the form and organization of the thesis is presented in the Graduate School's Thesis 
and Dissertation Guide which is available at the NC State Bookstores. 

COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAMINATIONS 

Written examinations covering the subject matter of the major and supporting fields 
and/or the minor may be required. When required, such examinations must be success- 
fully completed prior to requesting a permit to schedule the comprehensive final oral 
examination. Information concerning written examination schedules should be obtained 
from the student's department or program. 

COMPREHENSIVE FINAL ORAL EXAMINATIONS 

Candidates for master's degrees, except those in Option B programs, must pass a 
comprehensive oral examination to demonstrate to the advisory committee that he/ she 
possesses a reasonable mastery of the subject matter of the major and supporting fields 
and that this knowledge can be used with promptness and accuracy. This examination 
may not be held until all other requirements, except completion of the course work in 
current registration during the final semester, are satisfied. A request for a permit to 

43 



schedule the examination may be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School after the 
above coixlitions are met. The Graduate School will check to determine that the advisory 
committee and the courses taken by the student meet Graduate School requirements. If 
all requiranents are met, the permit to schedule the final examination will be forwarded 
to the Director of Graduate Programs within 10 working days of receipt of the request. 
Upon receipt of the permit, the student may proceed to schedule the exam at a time that 
is convenient to all members of the advisory committee. In. those programs which 
require the thesis, the thesis must be submitted in complete form, except for such revis- 
ions which may be necessary as a result of the final exam, to all members of the 
advisory committee at least two weeks prior to the exam. 

A unanimous vote of ^jproval of the advisory committee is required for passing the oral 
examination. Approval of the examination may be conditioned, however, upon com- 
pletion of additional work to the satisfaction of the advisory committee. A formal 
reexamination will not be required in this case. Failure of a student to pass the oral 
examination terminates the student's graduate work at NC State imless the graduate 
advisory committee unanimously recommends a reexamination. Only one reexamination 
will be given. A form giving the date that the exam was conducted and the result of the 
examination and signed by all members of the advisory committee is forwarded to the 
Dean of the Graduate School by the Director of Graduate programs in the student's 
department or program. A student may appeal all committee actions by written 
apphcation to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Oral examinations for master's degree candidates are open to the Graduate Faculty by 
right aixl to the University community by unanimous consent of the advisory committee 
and the student being examined. Discussions and decisions regarding the student's 
performance are private to the advisory committee. 

Students in Option B master's programs are not required to take a final oral examina- 
tion. 

RESIDENCE 

Studaits aigaged in a course of study leading to the master's degree are required to be 
in residence, pursuing graduate work, for a minimum of one full academic year or its 
equivalent. 

TIME LIMIT 

All requirements for the master's degree must be completed within six calendar years, 
beginning with the date that the student registers for courses carrying graduate credit 
appUcable to the degree program, unless a more restrictive time hmit has been has been 
estabhshed by the student's department or program or his/her college or school. 



44 



Summary of Procedures for Master's Degrees 

AT J. STUDENTS 

Application materials and required fees received. 

Application materials reviewed by department or programs. 

Department or program forwards recommendation regarding applicant's 

admissibility to the Graduate Dean. 

The Graduate School reviews the recommendation and the student is notified 

of the action taken on the recpaest for admission. 

Student arrives, reports to the department or program, is assigned a graduate 

advisor and develops a roster of courses and credits with the advisor. 

Student compUes with requests from Graduate School for updated copies of 

transcrij>ts from previous colleges or universities. 

Student signs patent agreement and files with Graduate School. 

Student subject to continuous registration poUcy until graduation. 

Student passes language examination, if required. 

Student passes written examination, if required. 

Student submits diploma order form by end of ninth week of the semester or 

summer session of anticipated graduation. 

A grade point average of at least 3.0 for the degree requirements as well as 

on overall graduate course work at NCSU is required for graduation. 

All degree requirements must be completed within six calendar years, 

beginning with the date the student commences courses carrying graduate 

credit appUcable to the degree program, vmless a more restrictive time limit 

has been estabUshed by the department/program or academic college/school. 

STITDFNTS TN OPTTON B PROGRAMS 

♦ Plan of Graduate Work prepared by the student, in consultation with and with 
the approval of his/her graduate advisor and approved by Director of Graduate 
Programs prior to completion of one-half the credits on the plan. 

♦ Director of Graduate Programs submits requests for graduation checkout to the 
Graduate Dean no later that 30 working days after the first day of the semester 
(seven working days after the first day of the summer session) in which the 
student is taking the last course on his/her Plan of Graduate Work and antici- 
pates graduation. 

STimFNTS TN NON-THFSTS PROGRAMS 

♦ Graduate advisory committee of three or more Graduate Faculty members is 
apjwinted by the Director of Graduate Programs. 

♦ Plan of Graduate Work prepared by the student, in consultation with and with 
the approval of his/her graduate advisory committee and approved by the 

45 



Director of Graduate Programs prior to completion of one-half the credits on 
the plan. 

♦ When all requirements except completion of the course work in the final 
semester are satisfied, Director of Graduate Programs requests that the 
Graduate School issue permit to schedule the final oral examination. 

♦ If Graduate School requirements are met, a permit to schedule the final 
examination is issued by the Graduate School within 10 working days of 
receipt of the request. 

♦ Final examination is scheduled and conducted. 

♦ Final examination report, including date and result of the examination, sub- 
mitted to the Graduate School by the Director of Graduate Programs. Report 
should be received by the Graduate School within five working days of the 
examination. 

♦ The deadline date for unconditionally passing the final examination in order for 
the student to graduate io a given semester or summer session appears in The 
Calendar in this catalog as well as other Graduate School calendars. 

STTTDFNTS TN THESIS PROCRAAfS 

♦ Graduate advisory committee of three or more Graduate Faculty members is 
appointed by the Director of Graduate Programs. 

♦ Plan of Graduate Work prepared by the student, in consultation with and with 
the approval of his/her graduate advisory committee and approved by the 
Director of Graduate Programs prior to completion of one-half the credits on 
the plan. 

♦ A copy of a preliminary draft of the thesis, if required, is submitted to the 
chair of the student's advisory committee. 

♦ When all requirements except completion of the course work in the final 
sanester are satisfied and after the thesis is complete except for such revisions 
as may be necessary as a result of the exam, the Director of Graduate 
Programs requests that the Graduate School issue permit to schedule the fmal 
oral examination. 

♦ If Graduate School requirements are met, a permit to schedule the final 
examination is issued by the Graduate School within 10 working days of 
receipt of the request. 

♦ At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chair of the 
student's advisory committee submits the thesis, if required, to the other 
members of the advisory committee for review. 

♦ Final examination is scheduled and conducted. 

♦ Final examination report, including date and result of the examination, 
submitted to the Graduate School by the Director of Graduate Programs. 
Report should be received by the Graduate School within five working days of 
the examination. 



46 



Stud^it submits three copies of the thesis, signed by each member of his/ her 
advisory committee, to the Graduate School. 

The deadhne date for submitting three copies of the thesis to the Graduate 
School in order for the student to graduate in a given semester or summer 
session appears in The Calendar in this catalog as well as other Graduate 
School calendars. 

The thesis is reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the format con- 
forms with the specifications prescribed in the "Diesis atid Dissertation Guide. 



Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education 

Degrees 

The doctorate symbolizes the abihty of the recipient to undertake original research and 
scholarly work at the highest levels without supervision. The degree is therefore not 
granted simply upon completion of a stated amount of course work but rather upon 
demonstration by the student of a comprehensive knowledge and high attainment in 
scholarship in a specialized field of study. The student must demonstrate this abihty by 
writing a dissertation reporting the results of an original investigation and by passing a 
series of comprehensive examinations in the field of specialization and related areas of 
knowledge. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

An advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members, one of whom will be 
designated as chair, will be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School upon the 
recommendation of the director of graduate programs of the major department. The 
committee, which must include at least one representative of the minor field, will, with 
the student, prepare a Plan of Graduate Work which must be approved by the director 
of graduate programs of the major department and the Graduate School. Li addition to 
the course work to be undertaken, the subject of the student's dissertation must appear 
on the plan; and any subsequent changes in committee or subject or in the overall plan 
must be submitted for approval. 

The program of work must be unified, and all constituent parts must contribute to an 
organized program of study and research. Courses must be selected from groups 
embracing one principal subject of concentration, the major, and, when appropriate, 
from a cognate field, the minor. Normally, a student will select the minor work from 
a single discipline or field which, in the judgment of the advisory committee, provides 
relevant support to the major field. However, when the advisory committee finds that 
the needs of the student will best be served by work in an interdisciplinary minor, it has 
the alternative of developing a special set of courses in heu of the usual minor. 



47 



CO-MAJOR 

Studaits may co-major at the doctoral level with the approval of both departments and 
the appointment of a co-chair from each department on the advisory committee. Co- 
majors must meet all requirements for majors in both departments. One degree is 
awarded and the co-major is noted on the transcript. Co-majors are not permitted 
betweai Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education degree programs. Enrolled co- 
majors will be classified in only one program for record purposes. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

For the Doctor of Philosophy and the Doctor of Education degrees, the student is 
expected to be registered for graduate work at an accredited graduate school for at least 
six semesters beyond the baccalaureate degree. 

The basic University residence requirements are defined below. However, academic 
colleges/schools have the prerogative of estabUshing more restrictive requirements 
within the respective schools. (The College of Education and Psychology requires a 
minimum of one academic year of full-time resident study). 

At least two residence credits, as defined below, must be secured in continuous 
residence (registration in consecutive semesters) as a graduate student at the Univer- 
sity. Failure to take work during the summer does not break continuity; however, 
summer work may be used in partial fulfillment of this requirement. 

Residence credit is determined by the nvmiber of semester hours of graduate work 
carried during a given term. During a regular semester, residence credit is calculated 
in the following manner: 

Semester Credits (Hours) Residence Credits 

9 or more 1 

6-8 2/3 

less than 6 (including registration for "DR" 1/3 

Dissertation Preparation" or "Disserta- 
tion Research") 

The residence credit for a six-week summer term is equal to one-half of the corre- 
spooding amount for a regular semester. For example, six semester hours carried during 
a summer session will earn one-third of a residence credit; less than six credit hours will 
earn one-sixth of a residence credit. 



48 



LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A reading knowledge of at least one modem foreign language (Romance, Germanic or 
Slavic) is required by some departments for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Other 
departments may designate that the language requirement be filled from among those 
languages in which the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures conducts 
testing. Doctoral students should contact the major department for specific language 
requirements. For the Doctor of Education degree, the decision as to whether or not 
there will be a language requirement is left to the student's advisory committee. 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers courses in French, 
German and Spanish especially designed for graduate students who have no previous 
knowledge of a foreign language or who wish to refresh their knowledge of a lan- 
guage. These courses concentrate exclusively on teaching students to understand the 
written word and do not provide instruction or testing in speaking and original 
composition. A passing grade on the final examination in one of these courses is 
sufficient evidence of a reading knowledge of the language. 

To danonstrate comprehaision in depth of one language, a student must not only prove 
that one possesses a reading knowledge of the language but also that he or she is 
proficient in the oral and compositional elements of that language. Students desiring to 
master one language in depth should consult the head of the Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures concerning the specific courses which will be necessary to 
achieve this comprehension; specific arrangements will depend upon the student's 
backgroimd in the language. 

Students whose native language is other than EngUsh may use EngUsh as one of the 
languages when two are required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. When EngUsh 
is submitted in partial fulfillment of the dual language requirement, the native language 
may not be used as the other language. 

When only one language is required in the student's program, certification for that 
language must occur on this campus. 

PRELIMINARY COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS 

After completing the language requirement but not earUer than the end of the second 
year of graduate study and not later than one sanester (four months) before the final oral 
examination, each doctoral student is required to take the preliminary comprehensive 
examinations. The examinations consist of two parts: written examinations and an oral 
examination. Requirements for written examinations in the minor field are left to the 
discretion of the department in which the student is minoring. 



49 



The vmttea portion may be conducted in one of two ways. In the first, each member of 
the advisory committee prep)ares a set of questions for the student's resjKjnse, and 
answers to each set are returned to the appropriate member for grading. This procedure 
is used by departments which have a relatively small number of doctoral students. 

Many of the larger departments have developed departmental written examinations to 
be used for all students, and scheduled dates are announced well in advance. Where 
writtai departmental examinations of this kind are used, the student will be expected to 
make arrangan^its to schedule these examinations. Regardless of the method employed, 
the questions involved may cover any phase of the course work taken by the student 
during graduate study or any subject logically related to an imderstanding of the subject 
matter in the major and minor areas of study. The questions are designed to measure the 
student's mastery of the subject matter and the adequacy of preparation for research. 
Failure to pass the writtai preliminary examinations terminates the student's work at this 
institution, subject to departmental and/or school poUcies with resf)ect to reexamination. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written portion of the preliminary examinations and 
after completion of all course work relevant to the examination, authorization for the 
preliminary oral examination is requested from the Graduate School. This examination 
is coiKhicted by the stud^it's advisory committee and a representative from the Graduate 
School and is open to all graduate faculty members. The student and the examining com- 
mittee will be notified by the Graduate School of the arranged time and place. The oral 
examination is designed to test the student's ability to relate factual knowledge to spe- 
cific circumstances, to use this knowledge with accuracy and promptness and to demon- 
strate a comprehensive imderstanding of the field of specialization and related areas. 

A unanimous vote of approval by the members of the advisory committee is required for 
the student to pass the preliminary oral examination. Approval may be conditioned, 
however, on the successftil corr^letion of additional work in some particular field(s). All 
committee actions may be appealed by written apphcation to the Graduate Dean. 

Failure to pass the preliminary oral examination terminates the student's work at this 
institution unless the examining committee recommends a reexamination. No reexam- 
ination may be given until at least one full semester has elapsed, and only one reexam- 
ination is permitted. 

CANDIDACY 

A doctoral student is admitted to candidacy upon passing the preliminary examinations 
without conditions or after fiilfilling any conditions specified by the advisory committee. 



50 



FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION 

The final oral examination is scheduled after the dissertation is complete except for such 
revisions as may be necessary as a result of the examination, but not earUer than one 
semester or its equivalent after admission to candidacy and not before all required 
course work has been completed or is currently in progress. The examination consists 
of the candidate's defense of the methodology used and the conclusions reached in the 
research, as reported in the dissertation. It is conducted by an examining committee, 
which consists of the student's advisory committee and a Graduate School represen- 
tative. This examination is open to the University community. 

A unanimous vote of approval of the advisory committee is required for passing the final 
oral examination. Approval may be conditioned, however, on the student's meeting spe- 
cific requirements prescribed by the student's advisory committee. Failure of a student 
to pass the examination terminates one's work at this institution unless the advisory 
committee recommends a reexamination. No reexamination may be given until one full 
semester has elapsed and only one reexamination is permitted. 

THE DISSERTATION 

The doctoral dissertation presaits the results of the student's original investigation in the 
field of major interest. It must represent a contribution to knowledge, be adequately 
supported by data and be written in a manner consistent with the highest standards of 
scholarship. Pubhcation is exjjected. 

The dissertation will be reviewed by all members of the advisory committee and must 
receive their approval prior to submission to the Graduate School. Three copies of the 
docum^it signed by all members of the student's advisory committee must be submitted 
to the Graduate School by a specific deadline in the semester or summer session in 
which the degree is to be conferred. Prior to final approval, the dissertation will be 
reviewed by the Graduate School to insiire that the format conforms to the specifications 
prescribed in the Thesis and Dissertation Guide. Detailed information on form and 
organization of the dissertation is presented in the University's Thesis and Dissertation 
Guide which is available in the NC State Bookstores. 

The University has a requirement that all doctoral dissertations be microfilmed by 
University Microfilms International, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, which includes pubhca- 
tion of the abstract in Dissertation Abstracts International. The student is required to 
pay for the microfilming service. (See "Special Registration and Fees" under "Tuition 
and Fees.") 



51 



TBVIE LIMIT 

Doctoral students are allowed a maximum of six calendar years from admission to the 
doctoral program to attain candidacy for the degree and a maximum of ten calendar 
years to complete all degree requirements. Academic colleges/schools or departments 
may have more restrictive requirements than the above stated pohcy. 

Summary of Procedm'es for Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education Degrees 

♦ AppUcation materials and required fee received. 

♦ AppUcation materials reviewed by department or program. 

♦ Department or program forwards recommendation regarding apphcant's 
admissibihty to Graduate Dean 

♦ Graduate School reviews the recommendation and notifies the student of the 
action taken on the request for admission. 

♦ Studoit arrives, reports to the department or program, is assigned a graduate 
advisor and develops a roster of courses and credits with the advisor. 

♦ Student comphes with requests from Graduate School for updated copies of 
transcripts from previous colleges or universities 

♦ Student signs patent agreement and files with Graduate School 

♦ Student subject to continuous registration pohcy until graduation. 

♦ Advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members appointed by the 
Graduate Dean upon the recommendation of the director of graduate programs. 

♦ Graduate Dean appoints a Graduate School Representative to student's 
committee. 

♦ A dissertation subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research 
submitted to the student's advisory committee and the director of graduate 
programs for review and approval. 

♦ Plan of Graduate Work prepared by the student, in consultation with and with 
the ^proval of his/her graduate advisory committee and director of graduate 
programs, and forwarded to the Graduate School for approval as soon as 
feasible after completion of 12 hours of course work. 

♦ Student passes language examination(s), if required. 

♦ Written examinations in the major and minor fields are scheduled no earlier 
than the end of the second year of graduate study and not later than one 
semester before the final oral examination. 

♦ When all written examinations have been completed satisfactorily, the 
chairman or the director of graduate programs requests the scheduling of the 
preliminary oral examination at least two weeks prior to the suggested 
date. Upon approval of the request, the Graduate School notifies the student 
and the examining committee of the time and place. 



52 



♦ The report of the examination is sent to the Graduate School and if the 
examination has been passed without conditions, the student is admitted to 
candidacy. 

♦ A copy of the preUminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the chair of 
the student's advisory committee for review, 

♦ At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chair of the 
student's advisory committee submits the dissertation to advisory committee 
members for review. A copy is submitted to the Graduate School Represen- 
tative at least one week prior to the exam. 

♦ One sanester or its equivalent after admission to candidacy or later, after the 
dissertation is complete except for such revisions as may be necessary as a 
result of the final examination, and at least two weeks prior to the suggested 
date, the student's advisory committee chair or director of graduate programs 
requests the scheduling of the final oral examination. Upon approval of the 
request, the student and the examining committee, including the Graduate 
School representative, are notified of the time and place of the examination. 

♦ Results of the final oral examination are forwarded to the Graduate School. 

♦ Upon passing the final oral examination, three copies of the dissertation signed 
by each member of the student's advisory committee and five copies of the 
abstract must be submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline in the 
s^nester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. One copy 
each of the University Microfilms Agreement, the Survey of Earned Doctor- 
ate, and the Graduate School Exit Survey forms must be completed and sub- 
mitted with the dissertation. 

♦ The dissertation is reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the format 
conforms with the specifications prescribed in the Thesis and Dissertation 
Guide. 

♦ All course work scheduled in a graduate degree classification must be com- 
pleted prior to graduation. 

♦ A grade point average of at least 3.0 for the degree requirements as well as on 
overall graduate course work at NC State is required for graduation. 

♦ The doctoral residence requirement of 2 residence credits must be satisfied. 

♦ All degree requirements must be completed within ten years from admission 
to the doctoral program. 



53 



THE NC State Libraries 

The NC State Libraries is dedicated to offering the fullest information resources and services 
to its user community. The library system consists of the main D. H. Hill Library; four 
branches serving the specialized needs of programs in design, natural resources, textiles and 
veterinary medicine; and an affiliated library serving the College of Education and Psy- 
chology. 

The Libraries' collections contain nearly 2.5 million volumes of books and bound journals, 
4.2 million microforms, more than 18,800 serials, and several hundred electronic resources. 
The collections are particularly strong in the biological and physical sciences, engineering, 
agriculture, forestry, textiles and architecture, with the arts, humanities and social sciences 
also well represented. The NC State Libraries is a depository for U.S. government documents 
and a U.S. Patent Depository offering access to U.S. patents from 1790 to date. The Media 
Center has a growing collection of audio, video and multimedia materials and is equipped with 
equipment for group and individual use. 

The NC State Libraries Information System extends access to a growing array of online 
resources, accessible from library terminals and from remote locations. Not only can users 
search the NC State Libraries' holdings by author, title, subject and keyword, but they can 
also search the collections of Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill and N. C. Central, along with a grow- 
ing number of databases. The state-of-the art Information Technologies Teaching Center offers 
instruction in use of the latest information technologies. 

As a further aid to graduate and faculty research, the Libraries provides interlibrary loan 
services to obtain material from other research libraries. Direct borrowing privileges are 
available with Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other UNC system schools. Other 
library services include orientation tours for graduate students and faculty and lectures on 
library use for all new students. In-depth reference service, geared to the individual needs of 
graduate students, is also available. 

Institutes 

RESEARCH TRIANGLE - The unique "Research Triangle" in North Carolina has captured 
national and international attention. It is comprised of the Research Triangle Park, a world- 
renowned research park, and three major research universities. Because of this wealth of 
educational and research opportunities, the Triangle area contains the highest total of 
Ri.D. scientists and engineers on a per capita basis in the nation. The Triangle Universities— 
NC State, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University— have a 
subsidiary campus in the Research Triangle Park— the Research Triangle Institute. The 
Institute, which operates as a contract research organization, has an annual research revenue 
of approximately $122 million. 

The Research Triangle Park, founded in 1959, now has more than 59 public and private 
industrial research facilities, situated on 6,800 acres of land. Over 34,000 people work in the 
park and over 30,000 additional jobs have been created outside the Park as a result of 



54 



itsexistence. Organizations in the Park include such government facilities as the National 
Humanities Center, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Envir- 
onmental Protection Agency, and the National Center for Health Statistics. Private com- 
panies such as Glaxo Wellcome, Northern Telecom and Reichhold Chemicals have their North 
American headquarters in the Park. Two major, state-supported research initiatives in Micro- 
electronics and Biotechnology are located in the Park and North Carolina's Supercomputing 
Center is housed there as well. Faculty and graduate students from the universities work close- 
ly with many of the Park companies. Scientists and researchers from companies like Glaxo 
Wellcome, IBM and Becton-Dickinson fi^uently hold adjunct appointments in one or another 
of the Triangle Universities. 

INSTITUTE OF STATISTICS - The Institute of Statistics is composed of two sections, one 
at Raleigh and the other at Chapel Hill. At NC State, the Institute provides statistical consult- 
ing services to all branches of the institution, sponsors research in statistical theory and metho- 
dology and coordinates the teaching of statistics at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The 
instructional and other academic functions are performed by the Department of Statistics, 
which forms a part of the Institute. 

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE - The Water Resources Institute is a unit 
of the UNC System and is located on the campus of NC State. The deans of the College of 
Engineering and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the Vice Chancellor for Research 
at NCSU and two faculty members from UNC-Chapel Hill serve as a board of directors. The 
Institute was established to promote a multidisciplinary attack on water problems, to develop 
and support research in response to the needs of North Carolina, to encourage strengthened 
educational programs in water resources, to coordinate research and educational programs 
dealing with water resources and to provide a link between the state and federal water 
resources agencies and related interests in the university. 

Research and educational activities are conducted through established departments and schools 
of the University System. All senior colleges and universities of North Carolina are eligible 
to participate in the Institute's research program. Basic support for the Institute's program is 
provided by appropriations from the State of North Carolina and the U. S. Department of the 
Interior, under the Water Research and Development Act of 1984. The Institute sponsors 
research and educational symposia and seminars, encourages the development of specialized 
training opp>ortunities and provides a means for the continuing evaluation and strengthening 
of the University System's total water resources program. 

Special Laboratories, FaciKties and Centers 

ACADEMIC COMPUTING FACILITIES - The Computing Center provides computing 
services and networking services via the University's Computer Communications System. 
This system links many computing systems on campus, including the on-line library catalog, 
and also provides access to the Internet. 

The Computing Center facility includes a UNIX-based client/server environment and 
software, including word processing, electronic mail, spreadsheets and math tools. Several 
networked public facilities are located on campus. The Computing Center also provides an 



55 



airay of centralized services including consultation, short courses, software licensing, campus 
electronic information system through World-Wide Web and a library of public domain 
software. 

A number of specialized computing facilities also exist in most colleges/schools which provide 
specialized education and research computing for their students. The University participates 
in the North Carolina Supercomputing Center and provides high bandwidth communications 
to CRAY vector and parallel supercomputers at the Center. 

BIOLOGY FIELD LABORATORY - The Biology Field Laboratory is located eight mUes 
from the University campus and comprises a 20-acre pond, 180 acres of extremely varied 
vegetation types and a modem laboratory building. The latter contains two laboratories, one 
for class use and another principally for research. 

The many unique ecological situations found in this area make it ideal for use by advanced 
classes of most biological science departments. Likewise, the area is well adapted to a variety 
of research projects by faculty, graduate students and undergraduates because of its habitat 
diversity. The close proximity of the laboratory facility to the campus makes possible many 
types of behavioral, physiological, ecological, taxonomic and limnological studies that could 
be accomplished only with great difficulty at other locations. 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESSING (AEMP) - 

The Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing was established in 1988 and is one 
of the 21 NSF Engineering Research Centers in the nation. The center's program is interdis- 
ciplinary and involves collaboration among chemists, physicists, materials scientists and 
electrical, chanical, computer and mechanical engineers. The research focuses on the devel- 
opment of electronic materials processing technologies that wUl provide the capability of 
producing submicron electronic devices. The program emphasizes low thermal budget pro- 
cesses using plasma and thermal and optically assisted techniques as well as the automation 
and control of thoses processes. It is a joint effort with researchers from the University of 
North Carolina (Chapel Hill and Charlotte), Duke University, North Carolina A«&T State 
University and MCNC. 

CENTER FOR ASEPTIC PROCESSING AND PACKAGING STUDIES (CAPPS) - The 

Center for Aseptic Processing and Packaging Studies was established in October 1987 to 
promote cooperative research between university and industrial researchers and to further 
scientific knowledge in areas of food and pharmaceutical aseptic processing and packag- 
ing. The center is funded by the National Science Foundation, NC State and industrial 
members from food, pharmaceutical and packaging industries. The objectives of the center 
are to support industrially relevant, fundamental research in aseptic processing and packaging, 
to enhance product quaUty and improve efficiency, and to communicate information gained 
from basic research to industry for development and marketing. 

Graduate students working on CAPPS projects will be exposed to industrial concerns and 
given the opportunity to work first-hand with industry in solving problems and making prac- 
tical application of their research. 



56 



CENTER FOR ADVANCED COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATION - CACC is an 

NSF-sponsored Industry /University Cooperative Research with research sites at NC State and 
Duke University. An advisory board comprised of representatives of member companies and 
government agencies meets twice a year to direct the Center's research activities. Faculty and 
graduate students also work closely with each member's technical staff on a variety of 
research projects. 

The Center's mission is to carry out basic and applied research on problems having both in- 
dustrial and academic relevance, to transfer these results to the members and to provide stu- 
dents with a challenging educational opportunity. The research goal is to create concepts, 
methods and tools for use in the analysis, design and implementation of advanced computer 
and communication systems. CACC is uniquely equipped to serve as a testbed for new net- 
working hardware, software and protocols because of its state-of-the-art Networking, 
Multimedia and Imaging Laboratories. 

CENTER FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF RADIOISOTOPES - The Center 
for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes was established in 1980 within the Department 
of Nuclear Engineering and associated with the Department of Chemical Engineering. It is 
composed primarily of faculty and their graduate students doing research related to the \em 
measurement applications of radiation and radioisotopes in industry. This includes the use of 
short-lived radioactive tracers, radiation gauges, radiation analyzers and industrial computed 
tomography. Excellent experimental facilities are available including solid state detectors and 
the NC State PULSTAR Reactor. The Center's programs are financed largely by an Associ- 
ates Program of Industrial Members and contracts and grants from industry and federal 
agencies. 

CENTER FOR LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES - The Center for Learning Technologies 
(CUT) is a multimedia service facility located in the College of Education and Psychology. 
Students are instructed through workshops, classes and/or individualized training in the effec- 
tive delivery of information and the design/production of instructional materials using a variety 
of computer technologies. 

CENTER FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN MATHEMATICS AND 
SCIENCE EDUCATION - The center, one of ten centers in the North Carolina Mathematics 
and Science Education Network, is the only research and development center in the network. 
Established within the Department of Mathematics and Science Education in 1984, the center 
conducts research and development activities for preco liege students, preservice teachers, in- 
service teachers and a University faculty. The center identifies areas of need in mathematics 
and science education and forms partnerships with federal, state, local and private funding 
agencies to work collaboratively to address the needs. Grants have been obtained from the 
National Science Foundation, Office of Education, State Department of Public Instruction, 
Local Education Agencies and IBM to introduce changes that incorporate technology and 
active learning into the mathematics and science curriculum, K-16. In addition, the center 
supports graduate students and provides them with opportunities to write grants and to design, 
conduct and report on educational research. 

CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN SCIENTinC COMPUTATION - The Center for Research 
in Scientific Computation (CRSC) is a formally recognized, multidisciplinary center of the 



57 



greater University of North Carolina System. The CR5C is administered by NC State and the 
College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. The purpose of the Center is to promote 
research in scientific computing and to provide a focal point for research in computational 
science, engineering and applied mathematics. Data-massive and/or computationally intensive 
problems provide ideal projects for training graduate students in applied mathematics. With 
advanced computing methodologies, students and post-doctoral fellows address important 
issues in processes of modelling and design. 

Research topics of interest to CRSC faculty include a variety of problems in scientific com- 
putation, numerical analysis and numerical optimization with applications to such areas as 
fluid mechanics and flow control, smart materials and structures, nondestructive testing, 
acoustics, material sciences and manufacturing processes, population dynamics, environmental 
sciences, signal processing, computer performance evaluation and nuclear reactor physics. 

CENTER FOR SOUND AND VIBRATION - Tne Center for Sound and Vibration, estab- 
lished in 1969 and administered within the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering, is composed of faculty pursuing the solution of a wide variety of problems such 
as occur in machinery and aircraft design particularly related to vibration and sound. Graduate 
programs exist at M.S. and Ph.D. levels in fields such as noise and vibration control, aero- 
acoustics, hearing conservation, computer-aided machinery design, active control of vibration 
and sound, and signal processing. Outstanding experimental facilities, which include large 
anechoic and reverberant rooms and computer graphics equipment, are available. The 
Center's programs are financed largely by grants and contracts from industry and federal and 
state agencies. 

DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING CLINIC - The Diagnostic Teaching Clinic is operated by the 
graduate program in special education within the College of Education and Psychology for the 
purposes of providing graduate students with opportunities to gain both observational and 
appUed clinical experience in diagnosing and teaching exceptional students of all ages. The 
clinic accepts referrals from local school systems and from agencies and individuals within 
the community. Staff, which includes graduate interns, evaluates the referred clients, devel- 
ops educational programs for them in conjunction with the referring agency and demonstrates 
teaching techniques for the benefit of those persons who will work with the children. This 
clinic is open during the day, late afternoon and early evening hours during the fall and spring 
semesters and throughout the summer months and is utilized by graduate students from several 
departments with allied curricula in education and psychology. 

ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH CENTER - The Electric Power Research Center is a 
university/industry cooperative research center established in 1985 within the College of 
Engineering. The Center is funded by the university and sponsoring organizations from the 
various sectors of the electric utility industry including equipment manufacturers and fuel 
ventors. The purpose of the Center is to foster the excellence of research and graduate-level 
degree programs in electric power systems engineering. Motivation for industrial firms to join 
with the Center derives firom close university/industry interaction, the pooling of membership 
dues to sponsor research of mutual interest and the enhanced professional and research 
opportunities provided to faculty and students. While the current research program mainly 
involves faculty from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the 



58 



Dq>artment of Nuclear Engineering, the Center facilitates access to all the various resources 
of the University. 

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE FACILITIES - There are three electron microscope facilities 
at NC State available to graduate students and faculty for research purposes. The CoUege of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) Center for Electron Microscopy is located in Gardner 
Hall, the College of Engineering (COE) Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) is in 
Burlington Engineering Labs and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) Electron 
Microscopy Laboratory is located in the NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine on Hills- 
borough Street. 

The CALS Center for Electron Microscopy offers complete service support in all areas of 
Biological Electron Microscopy. The Center has two scanning microscopes: a Philips 505T 
and a JEOL T-300 and two transmission electron microscopes: a JEOL lOOS and a Philips 
400T-STEM equipped with a C400M computer control system. The Center is also equipped 
with all of the necessary biological preparatory equipment. 

Formal instruction is provided through the microbiology curriculum for transmission electron 
microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and ultramicrotomy. The Center also provides 
support, service and training in a wide variety of digital imaging. Advanced techniques are 
provided on an individual basis or through workshops. 

The COE Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) is equipped with an Hitachi S-3200N 
variable pressure scanning transmission microscope (VPSEM), two high resolution JEOL 
6400F field emission scanning electron microscopes (FESEM) and a Cameca IMS-6f Ion 
Microscope. One 6400F is equipped with a Link Pentafet energy dispersive x-ray system 
capable of detecting low Z elements (down to boron). In addition, all microscopes are 
equipped with both film and direct digital imaging capabilities. Digital data acquisition 
capability allows direct computer display and storage of images greatly facilitating image 
processing and utilization for reports and publications. 

The S-3200N VPSEM accommodates large (6-inch diameter) specimens and in the variable 
pressure mode can image wet, oily and non-conductive specimens in their natural state with 
up to 35 A resolution, greatly reducing or eliminating sample preparation requirements. 

The JEOL 6400F field emission SEMs can handle up to 6-inch diameter samples and operate 
at very low accelerating voltages while maintaining high spatial resolution. The superior 
brightness and small spot size of the cold cathode field emission electron sources on JEOL 
6400F instruments enable them to resolve 14A at an accelerating voltage of 30 keV and 70A 
at l.OkeV. 

The state-of-the-art Cameca IMS 6f Ion Microscope is a high-performance, secondary ion 
mass spectrometry (SIMS) equipped with oxygen, cesium and gallium ion sources providing 
ppb to ppt sensitivity for most elements and a digital data acquisition system for acquiring and 
processing both 2-D and 3-D elemental distributions with atomic layer depth resolution and 
<0.1fim lateral resolution. 



59 



All microscopes are supported by complete materials specimen preparation, dark room and 
data processing facilities including several light microscopes and x-ray diffractometers. AIF 
analytical professionals teach regularly scheduled courses as well as short courses covering 
the analytical techniques available through AIF. They are also availabler for collaboration with 
and direct one-on-one instruction for graduate students. 

The CVM Electron Laboratory for Advanced Electron and Light Optical Methods 
(LAELOM) - The CVM Laboratory for Advanced Electron and Light Optical Methods 
(LAELOM) is a research/service/teaching facility housing all the optical equipment to examine 
cyto logical, histological and gross specimens, and the equipment to perform morphometric 
analyses, and to prepare material for presentations and publication. Individuals can prepare 
their own cryosections for light microscopy and immunological staining and can also prepare 
their own transmission and scanning electron microscopy samples. In addition, the LAELOM 
can prepare any and all of these materials for investigators. The LAELOM offers individual 
training in light microscopy, morphometry and darkroom work as well as a formal course in 
biological transmission and scanning electron microscopy techniques. A course covering 
photography in scientific illustration is taught in the LAELOM as part of the summer 
Biotechnology program. A Philips 410LS transmission electron microscope, a JEOL JSM-35 
scanning electron microscope, an automated Olympus VANOX photo micro scopes and a Wild 
photo-macroscope are available to students and investigators as well as a fully equipped 
negative processing and print processing darkroom. Equipment is available to make 2x2 
slides for presentations and to prepare posters and publication prints. The LAELOM offers 
consultation services for all these techniques in terms of specimen preparation, film selections, 
and cost determinations for purposes of grant preparation. 

fflGHLANDS BIOLOGICAL STATION - NC State is an institutional member of the High- 
lands Biological Foundation which provides support for the Highlands Biological Station of 
the University of North Carolina. This is an inland biological field station located at 
Highlands, North Carolina. The town of Highlands is in the heart of the Southern Appalach- 
ians at an elevation of 3,823 feet. The area has an extremely diverse biota and the highest 
rainfall in the eastern United States. 

Facilities are available throughout the year for pre-and post-doctoral research in botany, 
zoology, soils and geology. The laboratory building with research rooms and cubicles and the 
library are well equipped for field-oriented research. Also, five cottages and a dining hall are 
located on the edge of a six-acre lake. In addition to 16 acres surrounding the lake, the station 
owns several tracts of undisturbed forested land available for research. Research grants 
available through the Station provide stipends for room, board and research expenses. 

INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING INSTITUTE - The 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute was established at NC State in 1984 
to provide interdisciplinary educational, research and technology transfer program in manu- 
facturing systems engineering. The objectives of this program are to educate engineers in the 
theory and practice of integrated manufacturing systems technology; to conduct basic and 
applied research on topics in cooperation with industry on problems of contemporary 
manufacturing system; and to engage in technology transfer with industry. 



60 



Central to all aspects of the Institute's operation and activity is in the integration of computer- 
aided processes in the design and control of manufacturing facilities. Through both internally 
and externally funded research projects the Institute contributes to the solution of generic de- 
sign and manufacturing engineering problems and provides a vehicle for technology transfer. 

LEARNING RESOURCES LIBRARY - The Learning Resources Library, administered by 
the College of Education and Psychology, is located in Poe Hall. The library maintains a col- 
lection of print and audio-visual materials with emphasis on teaching methods, research, ad- 
ministration and psychology. An extensive collection of state-adopted secondary level text- 
books includes French, Spanish, language arts, mathematics, science, social studies and voca- 
tional education. Audio-visual equipment is available for instruction, research and previewing. 

MARS MISSION RESEARCH CENTER - The Mars Mission Research Center is one of 
eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the 
nation's engineering capability to meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. The 
goal of the center is to focus on educational and research technologies used in the design of 
spacecraft for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. It is a cooperative 
program involving faculty, undergraduate and graduate students at NC State and N.C. A&T 
State University. The research is a cross-disciplined program involving (1) hypersonic aero- 
dynamics and propulsion, (2) composite materials and fabrication, (3) light-weight structures 
and (4) spacecraft controls. Students and faculty conduct part of their research at NASA 
Centers and participating industries. 

MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTER - The Materials Research Center was established in 
1984 at NC State as an interdisciplinary program involving persons representing the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering 
and Physics. The present thrust area of the Center concerning thin films and coatings serves 
as a focal point for this cooperative research. The experimental efforts are conducted within 
the four departments noted above. 

MCNC - NC State is a participating member of MCNC which conducts research programs 
in information and electronics technologies in partnership with other North Carolina institu- 
tions. Other participating institutions are the UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke University, North Caro- 
lina A&T State University, UNC-Charlotte and the Research Triangle Institute. 

Faculty and students at NC State have access to the use of MCNC facilities on sponsored re- 
search projects. Areas of interest include systems design, systems engineering, integrated 
circuit fabrication technology, semiconductor materials, device physics, advanced packaging 
and interconnection technologies, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), high perform- 
ance computing and advanced networking research and development. Departments at NC 
State which are actively involved in the program include electrical and computer engineering, 
computer science, physics, chemistry, and materials science and engineering. 

NUCLEAR REACTOR PROGRAM - The Nuclear Reactor Program (NRP) provides spe- 
cialized nuclear facilities to the North Carolina academic and industrial communities. These 
facilities are used for teaching, research and service. The NRP supports graduate research and 
undergraduate programs in a wide variety of academic departments. The NRP facilities 
include the PULSTAR Nuclear Reactor, the Nuclear Services Analytical Laboratories, Health 



61 



Physics Laborato ries and the Scaled Pressurized Water Reactor Facility (SPWRF). The 
PULSTAR Reactor is a 1 -Megawatt research and training reactor. Irradiation capabilities 
include wet and dry vertical ports, horizontal beam tubes, a pneumatic transfer system and a 
graphite thermal column. Neutron radiography, prompt gamma activation analysis and neutron 
depth profiling facilities are permanently installed. 

The Nuclear Services Laboratories are well-equipped to perform routine reactor irradiations, 
neutron activation analysis, isotope production and low level counting. The laboratories 
maintain ten high-purity Ge and GeLi detectors, two multi-station Nuclear Data Acquisition 
and Analysis Systems, a Liquid Scintillation Counting System, an Alpha Spectroscopy System, 
sample preparation equipment and an extensive set of standards. The SPWRF is a non-nuclear 
woricing scale model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor. The SPWRF is used for teach- 
ing pressurized water reactor technology and for various research activities. 

The Nuclear Reactor Program is part of the Dq)artment of Nuclear Engineering and is located 
in the Burlington Engineering Laboratories on the main NC State campus. 

ORGANIZATION FOR TROPICAL STUDIES - NC State is an institutional member of the 
Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS), a consortium of North and Central American univer- 
sities which maintains field research and teaching facilities in Costa Rica. Each year OTS 
offers a series of courses that are open to NC State graduate students including tropical 
biology, agroecology, agroforestry and tropical agricultural biology. These 8-week courses, 
offered in winter and summer, are taught in Costa Rica and make use of a network of OTS 
field stations located throughout the country. 

The OTS faciUties in Costa Rica also provide a unique opportunity for tropical research by 
NC State graduate students and faculty. The principal field station, located in the northeastern 
Atlantic lowlands, has excellent laboratory and housing facilities and provides access to a 
3,500-acre tract owned by OTS. Another station is located at mid-elevation in southeastern 
Costa Rica near the Panamanian border. OTS also utilizes various other sites, including a 
seasonally dry area in the northwestern part of the country and a high-elevation area at 10,000 
feet in the Talamanca range. More information about OTS may be obtained through the 
International Programs Office. 

PESTICIDE RESIDUE RESEARCH LABORATORY - The Pesticide Residue Research 
Laboratory is a facility in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences devoted to determining 
the environmental fate of pesticide residues primarily in air, plants, soils and water. Although 
the laboratory is administered through the Department of Toxicology, it serves the total needs 
of the College in cooperative research projects requiring pesticide residue analysis. 

Although the laboratory functions as a focal point for residue research involving 
interdepartmental cooperation, the faculty in the laboratory conduct independent research on 
the fate of pesticides, indoors, after applications in urban environments and their movement 
and persistence in plants, soils and water after agricultural applications. 

The laboratory is equipped with gas. High Performance Liquid and Capillary Electrophoresis 
chromatographs, a GC/MS and all ancillary items required to prepare samples for quantita- 



62 



tion. Graduate study can be undertaken in any aspect of pesticide residue research either in 
the Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory or through one of the cooperating departments. 

PRECISION ENGINEERING CENTER - The Precision Engineering Center was estab- 
lished in 1982. The goal is to develop techniques for metrology and manufacturing at 
tolerances below those attainable with current technology. For example, fabrication of future 
electro-optical devices wUl require manufacturing tolerances better than 1 millionth of an 
inch. This goal requires new methods for measuring and controlling the parts being produced 
or the process being performed. Specific research objectives involve the study of metrology 
systems, control algorithms, machine structural dynamics, optics, materials, and micropro- 
cessors and the details of many different fabrication processes. An interdisciplinary team of 
faculty from Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, 
Computer Science and Physics along with research staff and graduate students are working 
together to address these research areas. The Center is housed in a state-of-the-art facility on 
the Centennial Campus. 

PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL CLINIC AND LABORATORIES - The Department of Psy- 
chology operates the Psychoeducational clinic located in Poe Hall. The clinic provides both 
a service to the public and training for school psychology graduate students. School-age child 
assessment and program development are the major services provided. Coordination of intern- 
ships and practica is also administered through this facility. 

Each graduate program in psychology also has laboratory facilities, either independently or 
shared. Thus, the experimental psychology program has laboratories for neuropsychology, 
auditory and visual perception, cognition and operant behavior. There is also a training and 
development laboratory as well as facilities for ergonomics, cognitive and social develop- 
mental psychology, human resource development, industrial/organizational and vocational 
psychology and social psychology. The latter facilities include one-way viewing rooms with 
recording equipment. 

SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM - North Carolina Sea Grant CoUege Program is a 
state/federal partnership program involving all campuses of the University of North Carolina 
system. A majority of its activities, however, are conducted at the NC State campus. Sea 
Grant combines the university's expertise in research, extension and education to focus on 
practical solutions to problems in the area of coastal and marine resource use and conserva- 
tion. Graduate and undergraduate research opportunities rest with individual project directors 
on campus via special graduate fellowship program administered through the program office. 

SOUTHEASTERN PLANT ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORIES - PHYTOTRON - 

The Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratory, often referred to as the NC State Phytotron, 
is especially designed for research dealing with the response of plants and microorganisms to 
their environment. A high degree of environmental control makes possible simulation of a 
wide range of climates found in tropical, temperate and northern zones. 

Research in the Phytotron deals with all phases of plant biology. Although the majority of the 
studies are conducted with agricultural and horticultural crop species, the Phytotron can 
accommodate ecological investigations, plant biology problems of the space program, 
experimental taxonomy and air pollution studies as well as basic physiological, biochemical 



63 



and plant molecular biology research. The Phytotron facility is available to the resident 
research staff, participants in graduate research programs of NC State and to domestic and 
foreign visiting scientists. 

TRIANGLE UNIVERSITIES NUCLEAR LABORATORY - TUNL is a laboratory for 
nuclear structure research. Located on the campus of Duke University in Durham, the 
laboratory is staffed by faculty members and graduate students in the Departments of Physics 
of Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill and NCSU. There is extensive collaboration with per- 
sonnel from the other two participating universities and with the many visiting physicists from 
the United States and abroad. Particle accelerators are used to bombard target nuclei with an 
assortment of ions of accurately controlled energy spread and spin orientation. The accelera- 
tors are a 15-MeV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a 4-MeV Van de Graaff accelera- 
tor. Polarized and pulsed beams are available as well as polarized targets. In addition, TUNL 
physicists perform experiments at major national and international nuclear physics facilities. 



Special Programs 



INTERNATIONAL AREA STUDIES GROUPS - The International Area Studies Groups, 
comprising faculty from across the university with common interests in an international studies 
area, provide a forum for sharing professional experiences; generating and identifying support 
sources for collaborative scholarly activities; offering seminars for the university; providing 
a public-service function for tlie campus and community at large by identifying faculty with 
expertise in their study area; interacting with visiting scholars and students from the 
geographic area specific to the study group; and serving an advisory role in institutional 
linkage development between NC State and universities in the study area. Additional informa- 
tion is available from the International Programs Office. 

RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES - NC 

State has been a sponsoring institution of Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) since 
1949. ORAU is a private, not-for-profit consortium of 95 colleges and universities and a 
management and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with princi- 
pal offices located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Founded in 1946, ORAU provides and develops 
capabilities critical to the nation's technology infrastructure, particularly in energy, education, 
health, and the environment. ORAU works with and for its member institutions to help faculty 
and students gain access to federal research facilities; to keep members informed about 
opportunities for fellowship, scholarship, and research appointments; and to organize research 
alliances among our members in areas where their collective strengths can be focused on 
issues of national importance. 

ORAU manages the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) for DOE. ORISE 
is responsible for national and international programs in science and engineering education, 
training and management systems, energy and environment systems, and medical sciences. 
ORISE 's competitive programs bring students at all levels, K-12 through postgraduate, and 
university faculty members into federal and private laboratories. 

ORAU's office for University, Industry and Government Alliances (UIGA) seeks out oppor- 
tunities for collaborative alliances among its member universities, private industry, and federal 



64 



laboratories. Current alliances include the Southern Association for High Energy Physics 
(SAHEP) and the Center for Bio-Electromagnetic Interaction Research (CBEIR). Other UIGA 
activities include the sponsorship of conferences and workshops, the Visiting Scholars 
program, and the Junior Faculty Enhancement Awards. 

Contact Jack H. Britt, (919) 829-4213, for more information about ORAU programs. 



University Patent and Copyright 
Procedures 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to teaching, research and extending knowledge 
to the public. 

It is the policy of the University to cany out its scholarly work in an open and free atmosphere 
and to publish results obtained therefrom freely, limited only by a short time delay in cases 
in which this is necessary to prepare and file applications. Patentable inventions sometimes 
arise out of the research activities of its faculty, staff and students which are carried out 
wholly or in part with University facilities. As a public service institution, the University has 
an interest in assuring the utilization of such inventions for the public good. Protection must 
be provided for at least some of these inventions through patents and the licensing thereof to 
encourage their development and marketing. Patents and their exploitation, however, represent 
only a small part of the benefits accruing firom either publicly or privately sponsored research. 

A portion of the research conducted by the University is supported by government and a 
portion by private industry. Service to the public, including private industry, is an integral part 
of the University's mission. As a public institution, the University, in its agreements with 
private industry or other private organizations, must keep the interests of the general public 
in view. The rights and privileges set forth in cooperative agreements or contracts, with 
respect to patents and copyrights developed as a result of research partly or wholly financed 
by private parties, must be fair and just to the inventor(s), the sponsor and the 
public. Research should be undertaken by the University under support from private parties 
only if it is consistent with and complementary to the University's goals and responsibilities 
to the public. 

SECTION lOO-Purposes: 

The North Carolina State University Patent and Copyright Procedures are designed to 
implement the Patent and Copyright Policies of The University of North Carolina. The 
procedures incorporate the interests of the faculty, staff, and students, the institution, and the 
sponsors of research, because in many cases those interests are congruent in desiring to 
encourage innovation and assure broad dissemination of the results of research. These 
procedures are designed to stimulate and recognize creativity among the faculty, staff, and 
students, and to establish an institutional process that is flexible enough to accommodate the 
different types of research and patentable work conducted at a comprehensive research 
university such as NC State. Equity and fairness are goals of the procedures in all respects, 
not only in the distribution of royalty, but also in recognition. Finally, these procedures should 



65 



provide an efficient and timely mechanism for reaching a decision about patenting with a 
minimum involvement of the inventor's time so that he or she may continue to be productive 
in the laboratory and classroom. To this end the University employs a patents administrator 
whose duties include providing assistance to faculty, staff a/ui students in matters related to 
inventions. 

SECTION 200-Ownership: 

1 . As defmed by the Patent and Copyright Policies of the Board of Governors of The 
University of North Carolina, to which these Procedures are expressly subject, NC State 
University has an interest in all inventions of University personnel, including students, that 
are conceived or first actually reduced to practice as a part of or as a result of: (a) University 
research; (b) activities within the scope of the inventor's employment by, or official 
association with, the University; and (c) activities involving the use of University time, facil- 
ities, staff, materials. University information not available to the public, or funds administered 
by the University. 

2. Faculty, staff, and students, whose inventions are made on their own time, outside the 
scope of their onployment or association with the University and without University facilities, 
materials, or resources and which inventions are, therefore, their exclusive property as 
specified by the Patent and Copyright Policies, may submit their invention to the University 
for possible patenting and/or commercial exploitation and management under terms to be 
agreed upon by the inventor and the University. 

3. The provisions of the NC State Patent Procedures are subject to any applicable laws, 
regulations or specific provisions of the grants or contracts which govern the rights in 
inventions made in connection with sponsored research. 

4. Under the terms of certain contracts and agreements between NC State and various agen- 
cies of government, private and public corporations, and private interests, NC State is or may 
be required to assign or license all patent rights to the contracting party. NC State retains the 
right to enter into such agreements whenever such action is considered to be both in its best 
interest and in the public interest. Ordinarily, the University will not agree to grant rights in 
future inventions to private corporations or businesses except as set forth in these procedures. 

5. All faculty, staff a/ui students engaged in University related or sponsored research shall 
sign a Patent Agreement. 

6. Students who are pursuing only non-research related studies shall not be obligated to sign 
an NC State Patent Agreement. However, if the student should make an invention which is, 
or may be, subject to University ownership in accordance with the Patent and Copyright 
Policies, the student shall disclose the invention to the University as provided under these 
Procedures and the University, together with the student, shall determine an equitable resolu- 
tion of ownership rights. 



SECTION 300-Responsibilities of NC State Personnel {Including Students): 

1. NC State personnel who, either alone or in association with others, make an invention in 
which NCSU has or may have an interest shall disclose such inventions to the Vice Chancellor 
for Research. The Vice Chancellor for Research will promptly acknowledge receipt of 
disclosures and will distribute the disclosures to the Intellectual Property Committee for 
consideration at its next meeting. 

2. For any invention in which the University has an interest, the inventor, upon request of 
the Vice Chancellor for Research shall execute promptly all contracts, assignments, waivers 



66 



or other legal documents necessary to vest in the University or its assignees any or all rights 
to the invention, including complete assignment of any patents or patent applications relating 
to the invention. 

3. NC State personnel may not: (a) sign patent agreements with outside persons or organiza- 
tions that may abrogate the University's rights and interests either as stated in the Patent 
Policies or as provided in any grant or contract funding the research which led in whole or 
in part to making the invention, nor (b) without prior authorization, use the name of the 
University or any of its units in connection with any invention in which the University has an 
interest. 

4. All faculty teaching courses in which students do work that may lead to patentable 
inventions should inform the students of the existence of the NC State Patent and Copyright 
Policies and of these Procedures. 

SECTION 400— Suggested Procedures For Record-Keeping: 

1. U.S. patent practice places a premium on witnessed records when two or more parties 
claim the same invention. The date the idea occurred (the "conception") and the date it was 
put into practice form ("reduced to practice") are vital. Equally important in the eyes of the 
U.S. Patent Office is the "diligence" shown by contending inventors. They must prove that 
they regularly pursued work on the invention, documenting their efforts on a day-by-day 
basis. The intent of U.S. patent laws is to recognize the first inventor; the one who originated 
the idea. Under these laws, the first to conceive and reduce to practice will receive a patent 
if his records bear out his claims; the first to conceive and the last to reduce to practice may 
win if his records show diligence. 

2. The careful recording of ideas and laboratory data is a matter of routine for industrial 
researchers. Each entry is complete and up-to-date, signed and witnessed; a legal record of 
the day's work. Record-keeping is not nearly so simple for the academic investigator , for he 
or she may work at odd hours or on weekends; may be closeted in a laboratory , an office or 
at home; and often lacks easy accessibility to suitable witnesses. Still, the keeping of a 
witnessed laboratory notebook is advisable. Additionally, such records can serve as valuable 
repositories of new ideas. 

SECTION 500-The Handling of a Disclosure: 

1 . When faculty, students or staff members make an invention, it shall be their responsi- 
bility to discuss their discovery or invention with the Department Head at which time the 
possibility of exploring patenting should be considered. Students should first discuss an 
invention with their instructor, who shall assist them in further discussion within the Univer- 
sity. The Director of Technology Administration is available to discuss possible inventions and 
to assist faculty, staff and students in the preparation of disclosures. If the invention appears 
to be a matter that should be considered for patenting, the inventor(s) should prepare a 
disclosure utilizing guidelines for invention disclosures which can be obtained for the Director 
of Technology Administration. The Department Head should transmit the disclosure through 
the Dean of his School to the Vice Chancellor for Research for consideration by the Intel- 
lectual Property Committee. 

2. Upon receiving a disclosure, the Chairman of the Intellectual Property Committee may 
refer the disclosure to one of several technical advisory committees to the Intellectual Property 
Committee. Technical advisory committees will be appointed by the Vice Chancellor for 
Research and will be composed of faculty and staff who are knowledgable and experienced 
in broad disciplinary or cross-disciplinary areas. These individuals will be asked to review the 



67 



disclosure from the point of view of whether or not, based on their knowledge, they believe 
the invention, if patented, would be a strong, viable, commercial product that would have a 
large market. The technical advisory committee in each area will meet prior to each 
Intellectual Property Committee meeting if they have any disclosures presented to them, and 
will discuss the disclosures and make to the Intellectual Property Committee, prior to its 
meeting, one of the following recommendations: 

A. That the disclosure has significant commercial possibilities. 

B. That the disclosure does not appear to have significant commercial possibilities. 

C. That the technical advisory committee could not determine, based on its knowledge, 
whether or not the disclosure has significant commercial possibilities. 

3. The Intellectual Property Committee will review each written disclosure promptly. The 
inventor or a representative shall be allowed to examine all written materials submitted to the 
Committee in connection with the disclosure and to make a written and oral presentation to 
the Committee. The Committee will decide on a disposition of the invention to secure the 
interests of the University, the inventor, the sponsor, if any, and the public. Its decision may 
include, but is not limited to, one or a combination of the following: 

A. To submit the disclosure for review by a patent or invention management firm or agent; 

B. To make inquiries of potential licensees that may have an interest in the invention, 
including the financing of a patent application, where applicable; 

C. To conduct a patent search concerning the patentability of the disclosure; 

D. To apply for a patent with University resources (an option with limited application 
because of financial constraints); 

E. To release University rights to the inventor subject to an agreement to protect the 
interests of the University, the sponsor, if any, and the public, including an obligation to pay 
to the University a percentage of future royalties or profits in cases where it is necessary to 
recognize the University's contribution; 

F. To dedicate the invention to the public; 

G. To waive further University interest in the invention. 

4. Normally, within four weeks of the receipt of the disclosure, the inventor will be notified 
in writing of the decision of the Committee on (a) the equities involved including financial 
partic^jation, (b) whether the University plans to file a patent application, or (c) whether the 
University will accept assignment of the invention for patenting, licensing and/or commercial 
handling as apphcable. If the University chooses not to file a patent application for an 
invention in which it has rights, or not to license the invention, or not to dedicate it to the 
public, upon the inventor's written request the invention, at the Committee's discretion, may 
be released in writing to the inventor, with the permission of the sponsor, if any. 

5. In those cases in which the University has obtained a patent without obligation to 
sponsors, if no arrangement has been made for commercial development within five years 
from the date of the issuance of the patent, the inventor(s) may request in writing an 
assignment of the University's patent rights. The Intellectual Property Committee will 
promptly either grant the request or advise the inventor of the University's plans for the 
development of the invention. 

SECTION 600-RoyaIty: 

1. NC State shall share with the inventors revenue it receives from patents or inventions. As 
noted in Section 200 (4), specific provisions of grants or contracts may govern rights and 
revenue distribution regarding inventions made in connection with sponsored research; 
consequently, revenues the University receives from such inventions may be exclusive of 



68 



payments of royalty shares to sponsors or contractors. 

2. The gross royalty revenues (net amount received by the University if there is a specific 
agreement in a grant or contract with a sponsor) generated by a patent or invention shall be 
the basis upon which the inventor's royalty is calculated. Unless otherwise agreed, the 
inventor's share of royalty revenues shall be 25% of the gross revenue. In the case of co- 
inventors, the 25% of gross revenue shall be subdivided equally among them, unless the 
inventors, with the concurrence of the Intellectual Property Committee, determine a different 
share to be appropriate. Applicable laws, regulations or provisions of grants or contracts may, 
however, require that a lesser share be paid to the inventor. In no event shall the share 
payable to the inventor or inventors in the aggregate by the University be less than 15% of 
gross royalties received by the University. 

3. To the extent practicable and consistent with State and University budget policies, the 
remaining revenue received by the University on account of an invention will first be applied 
to reimburse the University for expenses incurred by it in obtaining and maintaining patents 
and/or in marketing, licensing and defending patents or licensable inventions and the 
remainder will be dedicated to research purposes that may include research in the inventor's 
department or unit, if approved by the Chancellor upon recommendation of the Intellectual 
Property Committee. 

SECTION 700-Inveiitor Requests for Waiver of University Rights: 

1. If an inventor believes that the invention was made outside the general scope of his or her 
University duties, and if the inventor does not choose to assign the rights in the invention to 
the University, he or she shall, in the invention disclosure, request that the Intellectual 
Property Committee determine the respective rights of the University and the inventor in the 
invention and shall also include information on the following points: 

A. The circumstances under which the invention was made and developed; 

B. The employee's official duties at the time of the making of the invention; 

C. The inventor's intention to request an acknowledgment that the University has no claim 
if such request is deemed appropriate; 

D. The extent to which the inventor is willing voluntarily to assign domestic and foreign 
rights in the invention to the University if it should be determined that an assignment of the 
invention to the University is not required under the Patent and Copyright Policies; 

E. The inventor's intention to request that the University prosecute a patent application if 
it should be determined that an assignment of the invention to the University is not required 
under the Patent and Copyright Policies. 

SECTION 800-PubUcation and Public Use 

1. North Carolina State University strongly encourages scholarly publication of the results 
of research by faculty and students. Though the Patent and Copyright Policies do not limit the 
right to publish, except for short periods of time necessary to protect patent rights, publication 
or public use of an invention constitutes a statutory bar to the granting of a United States 
patent for the invention unless a patent application is filed within one year of the date of such 
publication or public use. Publication or public use also can be an immediate bar to 
patentability in certain foreign countries. 

2. In order to preserve rights in unpatented inventions, it shall be the duty of the inventor, 
or of his or her supervisor if the inventor is not available to make such report, to report 
immediately to the Vice Chancellor for Research any publication, submission of manuscript 



69 



for publication, sale, public use, or plans for sale or public use, of an invention, if a disclosure 
has previously been filed. If an invention is disclosed to any person who is not employed by 
the University or working in cooperation with the University upon that invention, a record 
shall be kept of the date and extent of the disclosure, the name and address of the person to 
whom the disclosure was made, and the purpose of the disclosure. 

After disclosure to the Intellectual Property Committee, the inventor shall immediately 
notify the Vice Chancellor for Research of the acceptance for publication of any manuscript 
describing the invention or of any sale or public use made or planned by the inventor. 

SECTION 900-Contractural Arrangements: 

1. North Carolina State University will follow Federal Regulations with respect to election 
of title in contracts and grants with Federal agencies. 

2. The University normally reserves the right to ownership of patents on inventions arising 
out of research supported in whole or in part by grants or contracts with non-governmental 
organizations or firms. Contracts or agreements which are entered into between the University 
and such organizations or agencies should contain clauses setting forth such a reservation 
unless deviations therefixDm are requested by the sponsor and approved by the Vice Chancellor 
for Research. In the interest of fair treatment to the sponsor in consideration for an investment 
and in the interest of discharging the University's obligation to the public in the application 
of its facilities and employee time and talent, special provisions may be negotiated by the Vice 
Chancellor for Research in such non-government sponsored contracts on options such as the 
following: 

A. The University will retain rights to patents arising out of such sponsored research but, 
if a significant portion of the research costs are borne by the sponsor, including direct costs, 
the sponsor may be assured a non-exclusive, non-assignable license at a most favorable 
royalty rate for the use of the patent. 

B. Other patent licensing alternatives may be negotiated in the research contract based on 
factors which will promote effective and expeditious transfer of the technology. Research 
sponsors are encouraged to seek guidance from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for 
Research. 

C. In order to protect the potential patent interests of both parties in such contracts in which 
the sponsor is accorded patent rights, the following procedure may be specified: 

"When in the course of the sponsored research project the investigator or investigators 
conceive or reduce to practice some discovery which appears to be patentable, then the 
inventor(s) will immediately inform the sponsors and the University of such discovery and 
will, for a specified period as negotiated (normally three months but in any case not more than 
twelve months), make available to the sponsor all pertinent information and disclosures which 
nuy be required for the development of an appropriate patent application. During this period, 
the investigators agree not to disclose this material to the public and agree to cooperate in the 
sponsor's effort to secure the patent. At the end of this agreed period, the investigators and 
the University will be free to proceed with publications and making public such other 
documents as they may choose. With the exception of the above mentioned agreed period, the 
University will operate industry sponsored contracts in the normal manner with no other 
special considerations being given to the sponsor. Under no circumstances will the sponsor 
have the right to prevent the publication of material or information derived during the conduct 
of the program or as a result thereof other than for the agreed period indicated above." 



70 



Prior written agreement of the investigators involved in research investigations to be carried 
out under these conditions must be secured by the University to enable the Univer- sity to 
discharge its agreed obligations under such a contract. 

SECTION 1000— Patent Management and Administration: 

1. North Carolina State University recognizes that the evaluation of inventions and 
discoveries and the administration, development and processing of patents and licensable 
inventions involves substantial time and expense and requires talents and experience not 
ordinarily found among its faculty and staff; therefore, it employs the Director of Technol- 
ogy Administration to provide assistance. The University may contract with outside agents for 
certain services. It may enter into a contract or contracts with an outside organization covering 
specific inventions or discoveries believed to be patentable and patents developed therefrom 
or covering all such inventions, discoveries and patents in which the University has an 
interest. The University may manage an invention using its own resources. 

2. The Chancellor shall appoint a Intellectual Property Committee consisting of no fewer 
than three members. The Vice Chancellor for Research shall serve as Chairman of the 
Committee. The Committee shall review and recommend to the Chancellor or the Chancel- 
lor's delegate changes in these Procedures, decide upon appropriate disposition of invention 
disclosures, resolve questions of invention ownership, recommend to the Chancellor the 
expenditure of invention royalties, and make such recommendations as are deemed appropri- 
ate to encourage disclosures and to assure prompt and effective handling, evaluation, and 
prosecution of invention opportunities and to protect the interests of the University and the 
public. The Director of Technology Administration shall serve as staff for the Committee and 
shall attend all meetings. 

SECTION 1100-Copyright Procedures: 

1. As a general rule, all rights to copyrightable material are the property of the author. The 
distribution or royalties, if any, is a matter of arrangement between the author and his or her 
publishers or licensees. Different treatment may be accorded by the University in case of 
specific contracts providing for an exception, in cases where the University or sponsor may 
employ personnel for the purpose of producing a specific work, where differ ent treatment is 
deemed necessary to reflect the contribution of the institution to the work, as in the case of 
software or audiovisual material, or where a sponsored agreement requires otherwise. All 
agreements concerning copyright ownership should be in writing and should be signed by the 
parties and approved by the Vice Chancellor for Research prior to the commencement of the 
work. 

2. An institute, center, or other unit of the University that is itself a publisher and that 
engages faculty members and other employees to write for publication by that unit as a part 
of their professional duty or produce other copyrightable materials, such as audiovisual 
materials or computer software, may, subject to the approval of the Vice Chancellor for 
Research, adopt rules providing that copyright on materials prepared by such faculty members 
and other employees in the course of their professional work for that unit vests in the 
University and not in the author. 

3. Guidelines and procedures for determining faculty, staff and student ownership of 
computer software were adopted by the NC State Board of Trustees, effective July 1, 1987, 
and are available from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research or the Office of Tech- 
nology Administration, Room 1 Holladay Hall. 



71 



FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION 

This section identifies and gives pertinent information about all the fields of study that 
participate in graduate education at NC State. There are a total of 86 different fields that 
offer graduate degrees. In addition, there are eight fields that offer minors at the grad- 
uate level and eleven areas that support graduate support graduate education through 
offering graduate level courses or in some other capacity. Fields of instruction that offer 
graduate degrees are Usted first. Information given for each field include the faculty, 
requiranents for admission to and completion of the degree program(s), student finan- 
cial support, courses offered and other relevant information. Following the degree 
offering fields is a hsting other fields of instruction which offer graduate minors, 
graduate courses or support graduate education in some other way. To avoid duplica- 
tion, basic Graduate School requirements for admission and completion of graduate 
degree programs are not duphcated for each field of instruction. Only those require- 
ments that are unique to the field are given in the sections on the individual fields. 
Graduate School requirements for admission are given in detail on pages 14-15 and for 
completion of degree programs on pages 39-53 in this catalog and are summarized on 
pages 75 and 76. 

Fields Offering Graduate Degrees 

The Graduate School offers major programs of study in the following fields. Except 
where noted by an ♦ or an exception in parentheses, these programs required the 
Graduate Records Examination (GRE) scores and will not take action on applications 
unless accompanied by scores for at least the GRE General (Aptitute) Test (verbal, 
quanititative and analytical): 

Accounting - Master of (GMAT) 

Adult and Community College Education - Master of Education, M.S., Ed.D. (GRE or 

MAT) 
Aerospace Engineering - M.S., Ph.D. 

Agricultural Economics - M.S. (Exceptions apply; consult program) 
Agricultural and Extension Education - M.S. (GRE or MAT) 
Agricultural Education - Master of Education 
Agriculture - Master of (Consult program of interest) 
Animal Science - M.S., Ph.D. 

AppUed Mathematics - M.S., Ph.D. (and GRE Subject Test) 
Architecture - Master of (Exceptions apply; consult program) 
Biochemistry - M.S., Ph.D. 
Biological and Agricultural Engineering - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. (Exertions apply; 

consult program) 
Biomathematics - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Botany -M.S., Ph.D. 

72 



Chemical Engineering - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 

Chemistry - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. (Not required but strongly encouraged) 

Civil Engineering - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 

Con^xxter Engineering - M.S., Ph.D. 

Computer Science - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. (and GRE Subject Test) 

Coimselor Education - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. (GRE or MAT) 

Crop Science - M.S., Ph.D. 

Curriculum and Instruction - Master of Education, M.S., Ph.D. (GRE or MAT) 

Economics - Master of, M.A., Ph.D. (Exertions apply; consult program) 

Educational Research and PoUcy Analysis - Ph.D. (GRE or MAT) 

Electrical Engineering - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 

♦ Engineering—Master of (Off-campus program only) 
EngUsh - M.A. 

Entomology - M.S., Ph.D. 

Fiber and Polymer Science - Ph.D. 

Food Science - M.S., Ph.D. 

Forestry - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 

Genetics - M.S., Ph.D. 

Graphic Design - Master of (Exertions apply; consult program) 

Health Occupations Teacher Education - Master of Education, M.S. (GRE or MAT) 

Higher Education Administration - Master of Education, M.S., Ed.D. (GRE or MAT) 

History - M.A. 

Horticultural Science - M.S., Ph.D. 

Immimology - M.S., Ph.D. 

Lidustrial Design - Master of (Not required but strongly encouraged) 

Lidustrial Engineering - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering - Master of (Excq>tions apply; consult 

program) 
International Development, Technology for - Master of 
Landscape Architecture - Master of (Not required but strongly encouraged) 
♦Liberal Studies - M.A. 

♦ Life Sciences - Master of (Consult program of interest) 
Management - M.S. (GMAT) 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences - M.S., Ph.D. (and GRE Subject Test) 
Materials Science and Engineering - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. (Exceptions apply; consult 

program) 
Mathematics - M.S., Ph.D. (and GRE Subject Test) 

Mathematics Education - Master of Education, M.S., Ph.D. (MR, GRE or MAT; PhD, 

GRE only) 
Mechanical Engineering - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Microbiology - M.S., Ph.D. 

Middle Grades Education - Master of Education, M.S. (GRE or MAT) 
Natural Resources Administration - Master of, M.S. 
Nuclear Engineering - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. (Exertions apply; conUct program) 



73 



Nutrition- M.S., Ph.D. 

Occupational Education - Master of Education, M.S., Ed.D. (GRE or MAT) 

C)p>erations Research - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. (Exceptions apply; contact program) 

Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management - Master of, M.S. 

Physics - M.S., Ph.D. (and GRE Subject Text) 

Physiology - M.S., Ph.D. 

Plant Pathology - M.S., Ph.D. 

PoUtical Science - M. A. (and GRE Subject Test. Not required but strongly encouraged) 

Poultry Science - M.S. (Not required but strongly encouraged) 

Psychology - M.S., Ph.D. (and GRE Subject Test and MAT. Not required but strongly encouraged) 

I*ubHc Administration - Master of 

Pubhc History - M.A. 

Rural Sociology - M.S. 

Science Education - Master of Education, M.S., Ph.D (MR, GRE or MAT; PhD, GRE 

only) 
Sociology - Master of, Ph.D. 
♦ Soil Science - M.S., Ph.D. 

Special Education - Master of Education, M.S. (GRE and MAT) 
Statistics - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Technical Communication - M.S. 

Technology Education - Master of Education, M.S., Ed.D. (GRE or MAT) 
Textile Chemistry - M.S. 
Textile Engineering - M.S. 

Textile Management and Technology - Master of, M.S. 
Textile Materials Science - M.S. 

Textile Technology Management - Ph.D. (GRE or GMAT) 
Toxicology - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 

Training and Development - Master of Education, M.S. (GRE or MAT) 
Veterinary Medical Sciences - M.S., Ph.D. 
Wildlife Biology - Master of, M.S. (GRE and GRE Subject Test not required but strongly 

encouraged) 
Wood and Paper Science - Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Zoology - M.S., Ph.D. (and GRE Subject Test. Not required but strongly encouraged) 

DepaitnaeDts not normally requiring GRE scores may in special instances require their 
submission as additional information to be used in making a judgment of the student's 
potential for succes in a graduate program. 

The following fields and units, while not offering graduate degrees, support graduate 
education by offering graduate minors and graduate courses or in some other capacity: 
Anthropology Design 

Artificial hiteUigence Ecology 

Biological Sciences Education 

Biomedical Engineering Engineering 



74 



Biotechnology Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Business Management Pest Management 

Co mmuni cation Philosophy 

Computational Engineering and Plant Physiology 

Science SoUd State Sciences 

Water Resources 

BASIC GRADUATE SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS 

Basic Requirements for Admission 

Basic requiremaits for admission to the Graduate School include two official transcripts 
from all colleges and universities previously attended, references from at least three 
people who know of the student's academic record and potential for graduate study, a 
non-refundable $55.00 application fee. Test of EngUsh as a Foreign Language (TOELF) 
scores for students whose first language is not English, and, in most cases, an official 
statement of the student's Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores and/or other 
standardized tests. The minimum TOEFL score, unless otherwise specified, is 550, with 
scores of at least 50 on at least two of the sections and no section score below 45. The 
student's area of special interest may have additional requirements which are included 
in the individual program descriptions to follow. 

Basic Requirements for Master's Degrees 

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for all master's degrees; however, 
many programs require more than thirty. Also, many students, in order to gain the 
breadth desired in their program or to make up deficits in their undergraduate degree, 
will actually take more credit hours than the minimum required by the program. At least 
20 s«nester hours must come fixjm 500- and 600-level courses. No more than two credit 
hours of departmental seminar may be included in the minimum 30-credit program. 
Programs that require a thesis may include no more than six hours of research credit 
(699) in the minimum 30-credit -hour program. Research credit is not appropriate in the 
non-thesis programs. Non-thesis programs may include no more than six hours of 
independent study credits in the minimum 30-credit program. Courses at the 400 level 
counted toward the minimal 30-hour requirement may not come from the major field. 

Basic Requirements for Doctoral Degrees 

The doctorate symbolizes the abihty of the recipient to undertake original research and 
scholarly work at the highest levels without supervision. The degree is therefore not 
granted simply upon completion of a stated amount of course work but rather upon 
demonstration by the student of a comprehensive knowledge and high attainment in 
scholarship in a specialized field of study. The student must demonstrate this abihty by 
passing written and oral preliminary comprehensive examinations in the field of 

75 



specialization and related areas of knowledge, where applicable, and by successfully 
defending the methodology used and conclusions reached in the research, as reported 
in the dissertation, in an open oral examination. In addition, the student must meet the 
residence requirement as described earUer. 

COURSES 

The courses Usted in this catalog are planned for the academic years 1996-1997 and 
1997-1998, unless indicated. 

Courses at the 500- and 600-level are graduate courses, but 500-level courses are open 
to advanced uiKiergraduate students, unless otherwise specified. Graduate standing is a 
prerequisite for all 600-level courses. 

Course Descriptions 

For a description of courses being offered, either consult the Graduate School Home 
Page on the World Wide Web at http//www2.acs.ncsu.edu/grad/ or obtain a copy of the 
course catalog, hsting all undergraduate and graduate courses, which is under 
development. 



76 



MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY 
Accounting 

Degree Offered: Master of Accounting 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

KPMG Peat Marwick Professor C. J. Messere, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor R.L. Peace, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 8113, (919) 515-4431, bob_peace@ncsu.edu 

Professors: J. W. Bartley, K. B. Frazier, P. F. Williams; Associate Professor: G. J. 
Zuckerman; Assistant Professors: M. S. Beasley, B. C. Branson, F. A. Backless, Y, 
A. Chen, K. A. Krawczyk, R. L. McClenny, D. P. Pagach, R. B. Sawyers 

The Master of Accounting (MAC) is a professional degree designed to prepare students 
for careers as public accountants, internal auditors or tax speciahsts. Graduates will be 
prepared to complete the CPA Examination. 

Admission Requirements: Successful applicants typically have a Graduate Management 
Admissions Test (GMAT) score above 500 and a 3.0 minimum imdergraduate GPA. 
The best-qualified appUcants will be accepted up to the number of spaces available for 
new students. Exceptions to the minimum GPA and GMAT score may be made because 
of the consideration given to other relevant factors. Prerequisite courses for admission 
to the master's program include accounting and certain other courses that are the 
equivalent of those required for an undergraduate degree in accounting. Apphcants may 
receive provisional admission prior to completion of the prerequisites, but will not be 
admitted to 500-level courses until prerequisites are completed. Complete information 
and appUcation forms can be obtained from the Director of Graduate Programs. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A minimum of 6 (maximum of 9) non-ACC credits are 
required. There are no required courses, but all programs of study are subject to ap- 
proval by the Director of Graduate Programs. The curriculum is designed to allow 
concentrations of course work in either auditing or taxation. 

Other Relevant Information: Master's students must begin the degree program in the 
fall semester, and they must carry at least two classes. 

In order to assure that an apphcation will be considered for the next fall semester, all 
application forms, transcripts, applicable fees, resumes, letters of recommendation and 
other relevant material must be received no later than March 1 . Apphcants wishing to 



77 



receive early notification of the admission decision should submit all required documents 
prior to December 1 of the year prior to admission. 

nRAnjjATFSi rnriR^FS 

ACC 508 ADVANCED COMMERCIAL LAW. 

ACC 510 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. 

ACC 515 ACCOUNTING THEORY AND CURRENT ISSUES. 

ACC 519 INTEGRATED ACCOUNTING PRACTICE. 

ACC 521 PRODUCTION COST ANALYSIS AND CONTROL. 

ACC 525 ADVANCED MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING. 

ACC 530 ADVANCED INCOME TAX. 

ACC 533 ACCOUNTING AND TAX RESEARCH METHODOLOGY. 

ACC 534 TAXATION OF CORPORATIONS AND SHAREHOLDERS. 

ACC 535 TAXATION OF PARTNERSHIPS AND S CORPORATIONS. 

ACC 536 TAXATION OF ESTATES, TRUSTS AND GIFTS. 

ACC 537 TAX PLANNING AND BUSINESS STRATEGY. 

ACC 550 AUDITING IN A COMPUTER ENVIRONMENT. 

ACC 551 ADVANCED AUDITING. 

ACC 552 ADVANCED AUDITING AND ACCOUNTING CASES. 

ACC 581 SURVEY OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. 

ACC 582 SURVEY OF MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING. 

ACC 588 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING. 

ACC 598 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ACCOUNTING. 

Adult and Community College Education 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., Ed.D., M.S., M.Ed. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. L. Deegan, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor E. I. Farmer, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7801, (919) 515-6238, farmer@poe.coe.ncsu.edu 

Joseph D. Moore Distinguished Professor G. A. Baker IE 

Professors: E. J. Boone, J. C. Glass Jr., E. MacPhail-Wilcox, R. C. Serow, R. G. 
Taylor Jr., G. B. Vaughan.; Visiting Professor: L. F. Harper; Professors Emeriti: M. 
P. Burt, G. L. Carter, Jr., M. S. Knowles; Associate Professors: H. D. Akroyd, R. 
Gillett-Karam, J. M. Groff; Visiting Associate Professors: J. L. Burrow, J. B. NichoL; 
Assistant Professors: P. F. Bitting, S. A. J. Colin m, J. L. Keedy, W. Lee, J. R. 
Valadez, A. L. Wilson; Visiting Assistant Professors: D. J. Eaker-Rich, J. J. Hoey IV, 
B. L Mallette, R. E. Parries, J. M. Pettitt; Ai^unct Assistant Professors: P. J. 
Fairchild, M. F. Gast, N. E. Hagan, E. S. Knott 



78 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors'. L. F. Bunn, R. D. Mustian, R. W, Shearon; Associate Professor-. R. T. 
Liles 

The department offers degrees in adult and community college education, higher 
education administration, training and development, educational research and j)ohcy 
analysis, and health occupations teacher education to meet the professional needs of 
administrators, supervisors, specialists and instructors in commimity colleges, four-year 
colleges and universities, business and industry, the professions and other adult 
education organizations. Program concentrations include adult and continuing education, 
community college leadership and higher education, and training and development. 

Admission Requirements: In addition to Graduate School admission requirements, the 
Department requires supplemental evidence of qualifications. Specific information 
regarding admission can be obtained by contacting the Director of Graduate Programs. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The M.S. and M.Ed, programs requires a minimum 
of 30 or 36 credit hours, respectively. A graduate course in statistics and a thesis are 
required for the M.S. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The Ed.D. program requires extensive research work 
and may include participation in a supervised internship experience. The doctoral 
program must be completed within seven years from the date of admission. One 
academic year of ftill-time residency is required. 

Student Financial Support: A few graduate assistantships may be available to students 
in this program. 

Other Relevant Iitformation: Students may concentrate in adult and continuing educa- 
tion (continuing professional education, educational gerontology), health occupations, 
four-year colleges and universities, community and technical colleges, and training and 
development. 

GRADUATFS rnURSFS 

EAC 500 COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND TWO-YEAR POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION. 
EAC 503 THE PROGRAMMING PROCESS IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

EDUCATION. 
EAC 504 LEADERSfflP IN fflGHER AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 
EAC 505 GROUP PROCESS IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 
EAC 510 ADULT EDUCATION: IDSTORY, PHILOSOPHY, CONTEMPORARY NATURE. 
EAC 517 CURRENT ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION. 
EAC 532 HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS AND ENVIRONMENTS. 
EAC 535 CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS. 
EAC 536 ISSUES AND TRENDS IN EDUCATION FOR THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS. 



79 



EAC 538 INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCA- 
TION. 

EAC 539 EDUCATIONAL GERONTOLOGY. 

EAC 540 EXTENSION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. 

EAC 543 ADULTHOOD AND LEARNING: THE LATER YEARS. 

EAC 545 DEATH AND DYING: A LIFESPAN ISSUE. 

EAC 549 FINANCE IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 

EAC 550 THE ENVIRONMENT FOR LEARNING IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
EDUCATION. 

EAC 559 THE ADULT LEARNER. 

EAC 567 EDUCATION OF SPECIAL ADULT POPULATIONS. 

EAC 578 LAW AND HIGHER EDUCATION. 

EAC 579 CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF EVALUATION APPLIED TO NON-FORMAL ADULT 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS. 

EAC 582 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS. 

EAC 585 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 

EAC 586 METHODS AND TECHNIQUES OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT. 

EAC 596 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 

EAC 599 RESEARCH PROJECTS IN EDUCATION. 

EAC 600 ORGANIZATIONAL CONCEPTS AND THEORIES APPLIED TO ADULT AND COM- 
MUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 

EAC 601 ADMINISTRATIVE CONCEPTS AND THEORIES APPLIED TO ADULT AND COM- 
MUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 

EAC 603 THE COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY PRESIDENCY. 

EAC 607 THE POLITICS OF HIGHER EDUCATION. 

EAC 610 ADVANCED QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS. 

EAC 616 HISTORY OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. 

EAC 621 INTERNSHIP IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 

EAC 637 PRACTICUM IN HEALTH OCCUPATIONS. 

EAC 696 SEMINAR IN ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 

EAC 699 THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 

ELP 514 FORMATIVE IDEAS IN AMERICAN EDUCATION. 

ELP 515 EDUCATION AND SOCIAL DIVERSITY. 

ELP 518 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION LAW. 

ELP 532 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL INQUIRY. 

ELP 534 ETHICS AND EDUCATIONAL DECISION MAKING. 

ELP 535 DECISION RESEARCH IN EDUCATION. 

ELP 536 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION AND POUCY ANALYSIS. 

ELP 541 PRACTICUM IN EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION. 

ELP 550 PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION. 

ELP 569 THE PRINCIPALSHIP. 

ELP 580 EVALUATION THEORY AND PRACTICE IN EDUCATION. 

ELP 589 PERSONNEL APPRAISAL IN EDUCATION. 

ELP 597 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION. 

ELP 599 RESEARCH PROJECTS IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND PROGRAM EVALU- 
ATION. 

ELP 614 CONTEMPORARY EDUCATIONAL THOUGHT. 

ELP 618 SCHOOL LAW FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR. 

ELP 620 CASES IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION. 

ELP 621 INTERNSinP IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND PROGRAM EVALUATION. 

ELP 632 APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS IN EDUCATION. 

ELP 697 PROBLEMS OF RESEARCH DESIGN IN EDUCATION. 

ELP 699 THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 



80 



Aerospace Engineering 



For a listing of graduate- faculty and program information, see mechanical and aero- 
space engineering. 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Degree Offered: M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. W. Shearon, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor J. W, Flowers, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7607, (919) 515-2707, flowers@poe.coe.ncsu,edu 

Professors: G. W. Bostick Jr., D. M. Jenkins, G. E. Moore, R. D. Mustian; Professor 
Emeritus: W. L. Carpenter; Associate Professors: L. R. Jewell, B. M. Kirby, R. T. 
Liles 

The agricultural and extension education program provides for advanced study for 
professionals in agricultural education, extension education or related careers. Programs 
of study may be designed to meet the individual needs of the student. Courses may be 
selected that lead to advanced teacher Ucensure in agriculture or an emphasis in 
extension education leading to advancement in careers in the Cooperative Extension 
Service. Additional specialization in the student's teaching or extension field is provided 
through a minor or advised elective courses. 

Admission Requirements: In addition to the Graduate School admission requirements, 
the department requires either GRE or the Miller's Analogies Test (MAT) scores, three 
positive references and a statement of careet goals and/or research interests. An 
interview (personal or by telephone) is also required. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The department offers an M. S. degree, which requires 
a thesis for which the student receives six hours of credit. In addition, an M.Ed, degree 
in agricultural education is available through the curriculum and instruction program as 
a non-thesis program track. Both master's degree programs require a total of 36 credit 
hours. Minors are optional but, if selected, require a minimum of nine credit hours. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Doctoral programs with specializations in agricultural 
and extension education are offered through the Department of Adult and Community 
College Education and through the occupational education program. 



81 



Student Financial Support. A limited number of research and/or teaching assistantships 
are available on a competitive basis. Other financial aid is available on a competitive 
basis from the Graduate School. 

GRAnUATR rnURSFS 

AEE 521 PLANNING PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

AEE 522 OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

AEE 523 ADULT EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE. 

AEE 524 AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS. 

AEE 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS. 

AEE 591 SEMINAR IN AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION. 

AEE 593 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION. 

AEE 595 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION. 

AEE 624 SUPERVISION IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

AEE 699 RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION. 

Agricultural Economics 

For a hsting of graduate faculty and program information, see economics. 

Agricultural Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see agricultural and extension 
education for the Master of Science in agricultural and extension education degree and 
curriculum and instruction for the Master of Education in agricultural education degree. 

Agriculture 

Several departments in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences offer programs 
leading to the Master of Agriculture and/or the Master of Life Sciences. These are non- 
thesis degrees that are designed for students who wish to emphasize course work in a 
graduate program. As such it requires a total of 36 semester hours. A minimum of four 
semester hours in special problems is required and not more than six semester hours will 
be allowed. A minimum of 20 credit hours of 500- or 600-level course work is required. 



82 



Animal Science 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Agriculture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor K. L. Esbenshade, Head of the Department 

William Neal Reynolds Professor E. J. Eisen, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7621, (919) 515-4017, gene_eisen@ncsu.edu 

Professors: L. S. Bull, K. R. Butcher, E. V. Caruolo, J. C. Comwell, R. G. 
Crickaiberger, W. J. Groom, Jr., D. G. Davenport, R. W. Harvey, W. L. Johnson, 
E. E. Jones, R. L. McCraw, B. T. McDaniel, R. M. Fetters, O. W. Robison, J. 
W. Spears, L. W. Whitlow, J. C. Wilk; Visiting Professor: R. E. McDowell.; 
Professors Emeriti: E. R. Barrick, R. F. Behlow, J. R. Jones, C. A. Lassiter, J. M. 
Leatherwood, J. G. Lecce, J. E. Legates, C. L. Markert, R. D. Mochrie, R. M. 
Myers, I. D. Porterfield, A. H. Rakes, H. A. Ramsey, F. D. Sargent, F. H. Smith, L. 
C. Ulberg, G. H. Wise; Associate Professors: B. P. Alston-Mills, J. D. Armstrong, 
J. H. Eisemann, W. L. Flowers, W. E. M. Monow, J. Odle, S. P. Washburn; Visiting 
Associate Professor: G. G. Gomez; Adjunct Associate Professor: M. T. Coffey; 
Associate Professors Emeriti: E. U. Dillard, J. J. McNeill; Assistant Professors: C. 
E. Farin, B. A. Hopkins, J.-M. Luginbuhl, M. H. Poore, M. T. See; Visiting 
Assistant Professors: S. L. Ash, J. A. Moore 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: J. H. Britt, W. M. Hagler Jr., D. K. Larick; Professor (USDA): J. C. 
Bums; Associate Professors: G. W. Almond, G. A. Benson, M. D. Whitacre; 
Assistant Professor: C. M. WiUiams 

Animal sci^ice offers an opportunity for training in a diversity of basic sciences and the 
integration of such knowledge into the framework of a Uving system. Students may 
major or co-major in animal science or one of the following disciplines: biochemistry, 
gaieties, microbiology, nutrition, physiology or statistics. Students may also concentrate 
in management and production areas. 

Admission Requirements: Factors considered for admission include: grade point 
average, scores on the GRE (for M.S. and Ph.D. apphcants), imdergraduate courses, 
letters of recommendation and a member of the Animal Science Department faculty 
willing to serve as the apphcant's advisor. 

Master of Science: The minor is optional but external faculty representation is required 
on the advisory committee. 



83 



Doctoral Degree Requirements'. Majors in animal science do not have specific course 
requirements. Each student's course program is developed in consultation with the 
Ph.D. advisory committee. The minor is optional but external faculty representation is 
required on the advisory committee. 

Student Financial Support'. The department offers a limited nmnber of half-time 
research assistantships on a competitive basis. To be eligible for support, applicants 
must have a minimu m grade point average of 3.2. 

Other Relevant Information: To provide an opportunity for students to develop their 
teaching skills, all graduate students are required to assist in the departmental teaching 
program, regardless of source of financial support. 

nRAnuAT FS rnuRSFS 

ANS500 ADVANCED RUMINANT NUTRITION. 

ANS(PHY) 502 REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF MAMMALS. 

ANS(GN) 508 GENETICS OF ANIMAL IMPROVEMENT. 

ANS 510 ADVANCED LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT. 

ANS(NTR) 516A,B,C,D ANIMAL NUTRITION RESEARCH METHODS. 

ANS 520 LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION IN WARM CLIMATES. 

ANS(PHY) 580 MAMMALIAN ENDOCRINOLOGY. 

ANS 590 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE. 

ANS(GN) 603 QUANTITATIVE GENETICS AND BREEDING. 

ANS(NTR,PO) 605 MINERAL METABOLISM. 

ANS 606 MAMMALIAN EMBRYO MANIPULATION. 

ANS(NTR,PHY,VMS) 632 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM. 

ANS 699 RESEARCH IN ANIMAL SCIENCE. 

Applied Mathematics 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see mathematics. 

Architecture 

Degrees Offered: Master of Architecture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. A. Saccopoulos, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor J. P. Rand, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7701, (919) 515-7114, carbuckle@umty.ncsu.edu 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor: H. Sanoff 



84 



Professors: P. Batchelor, R. P. Burns Jr., R. H. Clark, M. J. Malecha, J. W. 
Place, G. J. Reuer, P. Tesar; Visiting Professors: E. F. Harris Jr.; Professors Emeriti: 
G. L. Bireline, E. W. Taylor; Associate Professors: F. C. Harmon, J. O. Tector; 
Associate Professor Emeritus: D. W. Barnes Jr.; Assistant Professors: S. L. Roe, 
R. L. Spears; Visiting Assistant Professor: I. D. Fatea 

The DepartmMit of Architecture offers three tracks to the Master of Architecture degree: 
Track 1 is for appUcants with a four-year undergraduate degree in architecture and may 
be completed in two years of full-time study. Track 2 is for appUcants holding a five- 
year NAAB-accredited Bachelor of Architecture degree and normally requires three 
semesters in residence. Track 3 is for students with degrees in fields other than 
architecture. This track normally requires four semesters of preparatory work before 
entering the final two-year program of graduate study. Some appUcants with design 
-related academic or professional experience may be able to complete the preparatory 
work in less than four semesters. Curriculum requirements for the M. Arch, degree are 
held to a minimum in order to permit students the necessary flexibiUty to achieve 
individual educational and professional goals. 

A variety of courses are available within the Department of Architecture in urban and 
community design, architectural history and theory, methods and programming, archi- 
tectural conservation, professional practice, building technology and environmental 
systems. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to documents required by the Graduate School, students apply to the Master 
of Architecture program by submitting the foUowing documents by January 15: 1. Per- 
sonal Data form; 2. GRE scores (Track 3 appUcants only); 3. PortfoUo; 4. Statement 
of purpose. AppUcants wiU be considered on an individual basis. Exceptions to Graduate 
School poUcy may be made for students indicating other qualifications and professional 
experience. 

Master's Degree Requirements 

The department stipulates the minimum course credits based on educational and pro- 
fessional goals to individualize a plan of study. 

Student Financial Support 

There are limited provisions for tuition remission permitting out-of-state students to pay 
in-state tuition. The department awards a number of teaching and research assistantships 
on the basis of abiUty and need, and appUcations are available from the graduate 
secretary. Students are also encouraged to apply for competitive national feUowships. 



85 



GKAnJJATFS rnuR^FS 

ARC 543 ANALYSIS OF PRECEDENT. 

ARC 544 ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION. 

ARC 546 THEORY OF BUILDING TYPES. 

ARC 551 DESIGN METHODS AND PROGRAMMING. 

ARC 561 THE PRACTICE OF ARCHITECTURE. 

ARC 570 ANATOMY OF THE CITY. 

ARC 571 URBAN HOUSING. 

ARC 573 ENVIRONMENTAL PERCEPTION. 

ARC 574 PLACE AND PLACE MAKING. 

ARC 575 PARTICIPATORY DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE. 

ARC 580 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE. 

ARC 591 SPECIAL PROJECT IN ARCHITECTURE. 

ARC 595 INDEPENDENT STUDY. 

ARC 600 ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN (SERIES). 

ARC 681 FINAL PROJECT RESEARCH IN ARCHITECTURE. 

ARC 688 FINAL PROJECT STUDIO IN ARCHITECTURE. 

Biochemistry 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. W. Moyer, Interim Head of the Department 

Box 7622, 919-515-2581, jmoyer@bchserver.bch.ncsu.edu 

University Professor: E. C. Theil 

William Neat Reynolds Professor: W. L. Miller 

Professors: P. F. Agris, E. S. Maxwell, J. D. Otvos, E. C. Sisler; Adjunct Pro- 
fessors: K. S. Korach; Professors Emeriti: F. B. Armstrong, L. W. Aurand, H. R. 
Horton, J. S. Kahn, I. S. Longmuir; Associate Professors: L. K. Hanley-Bowdoin, C. 
C. Hardin, J. A. Knopp, P. L. Wollenzien; Assistant Professors: J. C. Hall, C. L. 
Hemenway 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: H. M. Hassan, D. E. Sayers, H. E. Swaisgood 

The graduate program in biochemistry is designed to prepare individuals for careers in 
research and teaching. Emphasis is primarily focused on laboratory research, where 
graduate stud^its work closely with faculty. The department is well equipped to conduct 
research in biochemistry, biophysics, molecular biology and molecular genetics. 



86 



Admission Requirements: Students entering the graduate program in biochemistry 
should have a bachelor's degree in biochemistry, chemistry or a related physical or 
biological science, including undergraduate courses in organic chemistry, calculus, 
jAiysics aiKl one year of physical chemistry, as well as biochemistry /molecular biology. 

Master of Science Degree Requirements: Up to 6 of the 30 credits required may be 
earned in laboratory rotations (BCH 692) and thesis research (BCH 699), On average, 
completion of the M.S. degree requires 2 to 3 years. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Requirements for the Ph.D. degree include a minimum 
of 30 credit hours in course work and thesis research, including at least two advanced 
courses in biochemistry/molecular biology; teaching experience. Formal course work 
may be completed within three semesters; on average, completion of the Ph.D. degree 
requires 5 years. 

Student Financial Support: The department endeavors to meet the financial needs of 
studMits accepted into its doctoral program. Essentially all admitted students are offered 
the opportunity to apply for graduate teaching and research assistanships. 

Other Relevant Information: The Department of Biochemistry is jointly administered 
by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Physical and Mathematical 
Sciaices. The department, committed to a strong research enviroimient, interacts with 
other life sci^ice departments on campus as well with the other research universities and 
institutes of the Research Triangle area. 

GRADUATES COJIRSKS 

BCH 552 EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY. 

BCH 553 METABOLISM AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. 

BCH 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. 

BCH 601 MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURE. 

BCH 603 MACROMOLECULAR SYNTHESIS AND REGULATION. 

BCH 605 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL. 

BCH 651 BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 

BCH 653 BIOCHEMISTRY OF HORMONE ACTION. 

BCH(GN) 658 NUCLEIC ACIDS: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION. 

BCH(GN) 661 ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL. 

BCH 691 SEMINAR IN BIOCHEMISTRY. 

BCH 692 LABORATORY ROTATIONS. 

BCH 695 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. 

BCH 699 BIOCHEMICAL RESEARCH. 



87 



Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Biological and Agricultural Engi- 
neering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. B. Beasley, Head of the Department 
Professor J. H. Young, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7625, (919) 515-6714, jim_young@ncsu.edu 

Distinguished University Professor, William Ned Reynolds Professor and Graduate 
Alumni Distinguished Professor: R. W. Skaggs 

Professors: C. F. Abrams Jr., J. C. Barker, D. B. Beasley, R. W. Bottcher, F. J. 
Humenik, E. G. Humphries, G. J. Kriz, W. F. McClure, R. P. Rohrbach, R. S. 
SoweU, L. F. Stikeleather, P. W. Westerman, D. H. Willits; Professor (USDA): T. 

B. Whitaker; Adjunct Professor: L, M. Safley; Professors Emeriti: H. D. Bowen, J. 
W. Dickais, L. B. Driggers, W. H. Johnson, F. M. Richardson, R. E. Sneed, C. W. 
Suggs, E. H. Wiser; Associate Professors: G. R. Baughman, S. M. Blanchard, C. 
G. Bowers Jr., R. L. Huffinan, G. D. Jennings, J. E. Parsons, A. R. Rubin; Visiting 
Associate Professor: G. T. Roberson; Assistant Professors: M. D. Boyette, J, J. 
Classen, R. O. Evans Jr., S. A. Hale; Visiting Assistant Professor: J. D. Spooner; 
Senior Researcher: S. C. Mohapatra 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: D. D. Hamann, A. E. Hassan, K. R. Swartzel; Visiting Professor: T, W. 
Rufty Jr.; Associate Professor: T. M. Losordo; Assistant Professors: B. E. Farkas, S. 

C. Roe 

Course offerings or research facilities are available in the following areas: bio- 
instrumentation, biomechanics, human engineering, bioprocessing, food packaging and 
processing, biological systems modeling, aquaculture, hydrology, water table manage- 
meat, ground water management, animal waste management, non-point source pollu- 
tion, power and machinery, soil and water, structures and environment, food and pro- 
cess engineering, electrical and electronic systems, forest mechanization, robotics, and 
machine vision. 

Admission Requirements: A baccalaureate in biological or agricultural engineering or 
the equivalent is the preferred prerequisite for admission. Those with strong academic 
background in the physical or biological sciences may also be admissible with a 
requiranent for certain additional background undergraduate work. In the case of appli- 



88 



cants with master's degrees, a master's GPA of at least 3.2 is required for admission. 
Exceptions to the overall undergraduate GPA requirements may be made for cases 
where performance in the major or during last two years was at or above the 3.0 level. 

ORE scores are recommended for those with academic performance records near the 
minima l level. AppUcants without engineering degrees from domestic accredited institu- 
tions must submit ORE scores to be considered for admission. Admission decisions are 
made by a faculty review committee. The best-qualified appUcants will be accepted up 
to the number of spaces available for new students. 

Master's Degree Requirements: (M.BAE): This non-thesis degree requires 33 hours 
of approved graduate course work and a directed special project which mixst comprise 
from 3-6 hours credit. A minor is required. (M.S.): A minor is required. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Course hour requirements are flexible but typically 
include at least 36 hours beyond a master's degree. Direct admission without a master's 
is possible in exceptional cases. A minor is required. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate assistantships are available to students in this 
program on a competitive basis. 

nRAnuATFS rnuRSFS 

BAE 501 INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL FOR BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. 

BAE(VMS) 522 MECHANICS OF BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS. 

BAE 552 INSTRUMENTATION FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND PROCESSING. 

BAE 572 IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE. 

BAE(SSC) 573 HYDROLOGIC AND WATER QUALITY MODELING. 

BAE(CE) 578 AGRICULTURAL WASTE MANAGEMENT. 

BAE(FS)585 FOOD RHEOLOGY. 

BAE 590 SPECIAL PROBLEMS. 

BAE(SSC) 671 THEORY OF DRAINAGE-SATURATED FLOW. 

BAE(SSC) 674 THEORY OF DRAINAGE-UNSATURATED FLOW. 

BAE(SSC) 6«0 TRANSPORT AND FATE OF CHEMICALS IN SOILS AND NATURAL WATERS. 

BAE 690 SPECIAL TOPICS. 

BAE 695 SEMINAR. 

BAE 699 RESEARCH IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING. 

Biomathematics 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Biomathematics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor K. H. Pollock, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 8203, (919) 515-1957, pollock@stat.ncsu.edu 



89 



Professors: H. T. Banks, J. W. Bishir, S. P. Ellner, J. F. Gilliam, T. Johnson, D. W. 
Nychka, H. E. Schaffer, J. F. Selgrade, R. E. Stinner, G. G. Wilkerson; A^unct 
Professor: L. B. Crowder, P. H. Morgan; Associate Professors: B. G. Fitzpatrick, C. 
E. Smith, H. T. Tran; Assistant Professor: T. B. Kepler; Adjunct Assistant Profes- 
sors: P. M. Dixon, J. S. KimbeU, M. W. Lutz, T. K. Pierson 

Biomathanatics is an interdisciplinary graduate program offering courses and research 
opportunities in basic and appUed mathematical biology. Degree programs are flexible, 
to accommodate students with backgrounds in the biological, mathematical or physical 
sciences. The program also offers Ph.D. and master 's-level minors. A brochure with 
additional information on requirements, courses, faculty and current research can be 
obtained by writing the program director. 

Admission Requirements: Apphcants should have either a bachelor's degree in biology 
with evidence of aptitude and interest in mathematics, or a bachelor's in a mathematical 
science with evidence of aptitude and interest in biology. Advanced (multivariate) 
calculus, linear alg^ra and general biology are prerequisites for all BMA courses, and 
deficiencies in these should be remedied during the first year of graduate study. The 
appUcation must include a narrative statement (1-2 pages) of the appUcant's goals and 
reasons for interest in the BMA program. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The M.S. and M.BMA, degrees require BMA 567 or 
611, 571-572; 2 upper-level biology courses; and 3 courses from the mathematical 
sciences or statistical sciences. The M.S. degree requires a thesis, and the M.BMA. 
requires two additional courses and a written project. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Course requirements consist of a "core" and a 
"concentration" in some area of biology or mathematical sciences. Core requirements 
are: BMA 571-572, 610 aiKl 61 1; 3 upper-level biology courses from at least two areas 
(e.g., physiology and evolution); and additional courses from the mathematical or 
statistical sciaices. Concentration consists of either a Ph.D. co-major in a biological or 
mathematical science or a coherent series of 5 graduate courses approved by the 
stud^it's committee, which must include a two-semester sequence and at least one 600- 
level course. 

Financial Assistance: TAs (generally in the Department of Statistics), RAs and 
internships are available. Awards are based on GRE scores, transcripts and letters of 
recommendation. RAs usually are held by continuing students. To receive full con- 
sideration for financial aid, the completed appUcation must be received by March 1. 

Other Relevant Information: All students are required to participate in the BMA 
Graduate S^ninar. Course requirements can be met by examination or by demonstrating 
that an equivalent course was completed at another university. 



90 



nRADUATFS rnuRSFS 

BMA 567 MODEUNG OF BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. 

BMA(MA,SD 571 BIOMATHEMATICS I. 

BMA(MA,ST) 572 BIOMATHEMATICS II. 

BMA 591 SPECIAL TOPICS. 

BMA(MA,OR,ST) 610 STOCHASTIC MODELING. 

BMA(OR) 611 SYSTEM MODEUNG THEORY. 

BMA 691 ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS. 

BMA 694 SEMINAR. 

BMA 699 RESEARCH. 

Botany 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Life Sciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. Davies, Head of the Department 

Professor C. G. Van Dyke, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7612, (919) 515-2727, gerald_vandyke@ncsu.edu 

University Research Professor: W. F. Thompson 

Professors: N. S. Allen, U. Blum, W. F. Boss, R. C. Fites, J. W. Hardin, J. F. 
Thomas, T. R. Wentworth; Professor (USDA): H. E. Pattee; Visiting Professor: W. 
S. Chilton; Professors Emeriti: C. E. Anderson, R. J. Downs, W. W. Heck, R. L. 
Mott, G. R. Noggle, E. D. Seneca, J. R. Troyer; Associate Professors: R. L. 
Beckmann, R. S. Boston, J. M. Burkholder, J. E. Mickle, J. M. Stucky; Assistant 
Professor: D. Robertson 

ASSOCIATED MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: M. M. Goodman, E. C. Sisler; Professors (USDA): S. C. Huber, D. E. 
Moreland; Visiting Professor: T. W. Rufty Jr.; Associate Professor: H. V. Amerson; 
Associate Professor (USDA): K. O. Burkey 

Course offerings or research facihties are available in the following areas: molecular 
genetics and physiology of development and signal transduction; biochemistry of crown 
gall; fungal diseases; physiological ecology of freshwater, marine and terrestrial plants; 
community ecology; composite plant systematics; ultrastructure and anatomy. 

Admission Requirements: In special situations, students with an undergraduate GPA of 
less than 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) may be admitted provisionally. If students lack certain 
prerequisites (i.e. in mathematical, chemical, biological or other areas), additional 



91 



courses may be required that do not qualiiy for graduate credit. The best qualified 
students will be accepted when spaces are available for new students. 

Master 's and Doctoral Degree Requirements: Courses from each of the four botany 
subdisciplines (ecology, physiology, anatomy and systematics) are required. Students 
must eam a letter grade of at least a "B" in these courses. Other requirements include: 
a graduate statistics course, a thesis (for the Ph.D. and M.S., but not the M.LS.), a 
comprehensive examination (Ph.D.), oral thesis defense and a one-semester teaching 
responsibihty per degree. 

Other Relevant It\formation: Graduate research and teaching assistantships and tuition 
rranission information are available from the department. Graduate students are expect- 
ed to attaid and participate in the saninar program every semester they are in residence. 
The department is host to several training grants in plant cell and molecular biology 
founded by the McKnight Foundation, the Tri-Agency (NSF,DOE,USDA) and NASA. 

nRABJlATE rniJR^FS 

BO 510 PLANT ANATOMY. 

BO(CS,HS) 518 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS. 

BO 522 ADVANCED MORPHOLOGY AND PHYLOGENY Or SEED PLANTS. 

BO 544 PLANT GEOGRAPHY. 

BO 545 PALEOBOTANY. 

BO(CS,GN,HS) 547 CELL AND TISSUE TECHNIQUES IN PLANT BREEDING. 

BO 551 ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY I. 

BO 552 ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY II. 

BO 554 LABORATORY IN ADVANCED PLAINT PHYSIOLOGY II. 

BO(ZO) 560 PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY. 

BO 561 PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY. 

BO 565 PLANT COMMUNITY ECOLOGY. 

BO(MB)574 PHYCOLOGY. 

BO(MB,PP) 575 THE FUNGI. 

BO(MB,PP)576 THE FUNGI-LAB. 

BO 580 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. 

BO 590 TOPICAL PROBLEMS. 

BO(PP) 625 ADVANCED MYCOLOGY. 

BO(GN,MB,PP) 627 FUNGAL GENETICS AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

BO 631 WATER RELATIONS OF PLANTS. 

BO 633 PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. 

BO(ZO) 660 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ECOLOGY I. 

BO 662 APPLIED COASTAL ECOLOGY. 

BO 691 BOTANY SEMINAR. 

BO 693 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BOTANY. 

BO 699 RESEARCH. 



92 



Chemical Engineering 

Degrees O^ered: Ph.D, M.S., Master of Chemical Engmeering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Hoechst-Celanese and Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor R. G. Carbonell, 

Head of the Department 

Professor C. K.Hall, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7905, (919) 515-2324, hall@eos.ncsu.edu 

Camille Dreyfus Professor: H. B.Hopfenberg 
Distinguished University Professor: D. F. Ollis 
Hoechst-Celanese Professor: R. M. Felder 

Professors: K. J. Bachmann, P. S. Fedkiw, R. M. Kelly, P. K. Kilpatrick, P. K. 
Lim, M. R. Overcash, G. W. Roberts, C. J. Setzer, R. M. Thorogood; Adjunct 
Professor: J. Preston; Professors Emeriti: J. K. Ferrell, D. B. Marsland, A. S. 
Michaels, V. T. Stannett; Associate Professors: B. D. Freeman, S. A. Khan, H. H. 
Lamb, S. W. Peretti, H. M. Winston; Adjunct Associate Professors: P. M. 
Schlosser, J. J. Spivey, J. L. Williams; Assistant Professors: C. S. Grant, G. N. 
Parsons; Adjunct Assistant Professor: R. T. Chern 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: H. Jameel, T. W, Joyce; Associate Professor: C. M. Balik 

Research activities in the department include: biochemical engineering, catalysis and 
reaction engineering, computer-aided design and manufacturing, electronic materials, 
electrochemical ^igineering, aivironmental engineering; polymer science and engineer- 
ing, thermodynamics and computer simulation, and transport phenomena. 

Admissions Requirements: Students admitted to the graduate program normally have 
a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering or its equivalent. Students with 
undergraduate degrees in chemistry, physics or other engineering disciplines may be 
admitted but will be required to make up undergraduate course work deficiencies in 
chemical engineering without graduate credit. The most promising candidates will be 
accepted up to the number of spaces available. 

Master of Science Degree Requirements: A set of 5 core courses is strongly 
recommended. The thesis must be defended in a final public oral examination. 



93 



Master of Chemical Engineering Degree Requirements: A 3-credit project is required. 
A set of 5 core courses is strongly recommended. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Requirements: Students normally take a set of S core 
courses, two advanced chanical aigineering courses and at least 6 credits of dissertation 
research. A thesis is required; this must be defended in a final pubUc oral examination. 
In addition, the candidate must: (1) submit and defend an original written proposition 
in any area of chemical engineering, and (2) submit and defend a proposal to perform 
his/her thesis research. 

nRAnuATR rnijRRFS 

CHE 511 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROCESS MODELING. 

CHE 513 THERMODYNAMICS L 

CHE 515 TRANSPORT PHENOMENA L 

CHE 516 TRANSPORT PHENOMENA II. 

CHE 517 CHEMICAL REACTION ENGINEERING. 

CHE 521 SEPARATION PROCESSES. 

CHE(OR) 527 OPTIMIZATION OF ENGINEERING PROCESSES. 

CHE 543 POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 

CHE 551 BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

CHE 552 SEPARATION PROCESSES FOR BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS. 

CHE<TC) 569 POLYMERS, SURFACTANTS AND COLLOIDAL MATERIALS. 

CHE 597 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS. 

CHE 598 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

CHE 613 THERMODYNAMICS IL 

CHE 617 ADVANCED CHEMICAL REACTION ENGINEERING. 

CHE 619 ELECTROCHEMICAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS. 

CHE 660 PHOTOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING: FUNDAMENTALS AND APPUCATIONS. 

CHE{TC) 669 DIFFUSION IN POLYMERS. 

CHE(TC) 671 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLYMER SCIENCE. 

CHE 695 SEMINAR. 

CHE 697 ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS. 

CHE 699 RESEARCH. 

Chemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Chemistry 

Professor R. A. Osteryoung, Head of the Department 
Professor R. J. Linderman, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 8204, (919) 515-2548, russell_Underman@ncsu.edu 

Professors: R. D. Bereman, L. H. Bowen, C. L. Bumgardner, H. H. Carmichael, 
D. L. Comins, K. W. Hanck, F. C. Hentz Jr., S. G. Levine, M. L. MUes, C. G. 
Moreland, J. G. Osteryoung, S. T. Purrington, A. F. Schreiner, E. O. Stejskal, W. 



94 



p. Tucker, G. H. WahlJr., M. H. Whangbo, J. L. Whitten; Professors Emeriti: G. 
O. Doak, L. D. Freedman, F. W, Getzen, Z. Z. Hugus Jr., R. H. Loeppert, R. C. 
White; Associate Professors: C. B. Boss, E. F. Bowden, T. C. Caves, Y. Ebisuzaki, 
M. G. Khaledi, W. L. Switzer, D. W. Wertz; Associate Professors Emeriti: A. F. 
Coots, T. M. Ward; Assistant Professors: C. R. Comman, C. B. Gorman, J. D. 
Martin, D. A. Shultz 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Professor: J. D. Otvos 

The Department of Chemistry offers programs of study leading to the Doctor of 
Hiilosophy, Master of Science and Master of Chemistry degrees. The Ph.D. and M.S. 
degrees are based on original research, while the Master of Chemistry degree is a non- 
research degree. Many research projects merge disciplines such as biochemistry, com- 
putational sci^ice, materials science, physics, statistics and toxicology with chemistry. 
General courses as well as advanced and special topics courses are offered. 

Admission Requirements: Applicants should have an undergraduate degree in chemistry 
or in a closely related field with a strong chemistry backgroimd. A GPA of at least 3.0 
in the scioices is needed for consideration. GRE General Test scores are required, and 
the Subject Test is recommended. Admission decisions are made as completed appUca- 
tions are received. For most favorable consideration for the fall term, all appUcation 
materials should be received by March 1; for spring admission, by August 15. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The requirements for a Master of Chemistry degree are 
27 hours of course work, 3 hours of a critical review paper and an oral examination on 
the review pjaper. Students in this program should have present or past experience in a 
research laboratory. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: In the doctoral program, emphasis is placed on original 
research and a comprehensive knowledge of one's chosen field. There are no definite 
credit-hour requirements for the doctoral degree. 

Student Financial Support: Incoming graduate students are supported by departmental 
teaching assistantships. Outstanding applicants are ehgible for supplemental fellowships 
during their first year of study. Research assistantships are normally available to 
second-, third-, and fourth-year students. The department also has fellowships for 
students interested in the area of electronic materials and fellowships for students 
interested in pharmaceutical and synthetic organic chemistry. 

Other Relevant Information: The Department of Chemistry is one of five academic 
d^jartments in the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. Several new faculty 



95 



have been added in the last few years, thereby enhancing opportunities for graduate 
research. 

nRADUATF rnuR^FS 

CH 501 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. 
CH 503 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. 
CH 505 PHYSICAL METHODS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

CH(MAT) 507 CHEMICAL CONCEPTS IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. 
CH 511 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY I. 
CH 513 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY II. 
CH 514 ELECTRONICS AND INSTRUMENTATION LABORATORY. 
CH 515 CHEMICAL INSTRUMENTATION. 

CH 517 PHYSICAL METHODS OF ELEMENTAL TRACE ANALYSIS. 
CH 518 TRACE ANALYSIS LABORATORY. 
CH 521 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. 
CH 523 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. 
CH 525 PHYSICAL METHODS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 
CH 527 MASS SPECTROMETRY. 
CH 530 ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 
CH 531 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS I. 
CH533 CHEMICAL KINETICS. 
CH 536 CHEMICAL SPECTROSCOPY. 
CH537 QUANTUM CHEMISTRY. 
CH539 COLLOID CHEMISTRY. 

CH(MAT,TC) 562 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS-BULK PROPERTIES. 
CH 595 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. 
CH 611 ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY. 
CH613 ELECTROCHEMISTRY. 
CH615 CHEMICAL SEPARATION. 
CH 625 ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS. 
CH 627 CHEMISTRY OF METAI^ORGANIC COMPOUNDS. 
CH659 NATURAL PRODUCTS. 

CH(MAT,TC) 662 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS-SOLUTION PROPERT- 
IES. 
CH691 SEMINAR. 

CH 695 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. 
CH 697 ADVANCED CHEMISTRY PROJECTS. 
CH699 CHEMICAL RESEARCH. 

Civil Engineering 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M. S., Master of Civil Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. D. Brill Jr., Head of the Department 
Professor H. E. Wahls, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7908, (919) 515-7344, wahls@eos.ncsu.edu 

Distinguished Professor: J. M. Hanson 

96 



Professors: S. H. Ahmad, R. H. Borden, E. D. Brill Jr., J. S. Fisher, C. G. Gilbert, 
A. K. Gupta, K. S. Havner, Y. Hone, D. W. Johnston, N. P. Khosla, W. J. Rasdorf, 
N. M. Rouphail, C. C. Tung; A^unct Professor: L. E. King.; Professors Emeriti: M. 
Amein, P. D. Cribbins, R. A. Douglas, J. F. Ely, R. E. Fadum, C. L. Heimbach, J. 
W. Horn, A. I. Kashef, C. L. Mann, S. W. Nunnally, M. E. Uyanik, P. Z. Zia; 
Associate Professors: M. A. Barlaz, J. W. Baugh, Jr., L. E. Beraold, W. L. 
Bingham, R. C. Borden, A. C. Chao, E. D. Gurley, Y. R. Kim, P. C. Lambe, H. 
R. Malcom Jr., V. C. Matzen, J. M. Nau, M. F. Overton, M. S. Rahman, J. C. 
Smith, J. R. Stone; Assistant Professors: H. C. Frey, T. Hassan, J. E. Hummer, 
N. Krstulovic, M. L. Lining, S. K. Liehr, S. R. Ranjithan, A. A. Tayebah; Adjunct 
Assistant Professors: D. R. van der Vaart 

ASSOCIATED MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Assistant Professor : B. Kasal 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL ADJUNCT GRADUATE FACULTY 

S. Chang, M. R. Salami, J. S. Wu 

Graduate programs are offered in coastal and ocean engineering, computer-aided engi- 
neering, construction engineering and management, environmental and water resources 
engineering, geotechnical engineering, structures and mechanics, transjxjrtation engi- 
neering and materials. 

Admission Requirements: Provisional admission may be granted to appUcants who do 
not satisfy normal admission criteria but have other special qualifications. Apphcants 
without academic experi^ice in civil engineering may be required to take undergraduate 
courses to remove deficiencies, without graduate credit. The Graduate Record Examina- 
tion normally is required of all apphcants. 

Master's Degree Requirements: (M.CE.): The M.CE. is an Option B non-thesis degree 
with other requirements, such as independent projects or core courses, specified in some 
areas of specialization. At least two-thirds of a master's program should be in a well- 
defined major area of concentration. A formal minor is not permitted. (M.S.): A thesis 
is required and a formal minor is optional. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The Ph.D. typically requires one year of full-time 
course work beyond the master's degree. The program must develop a weU-defmed 
major area of concentration and may include supporting courses outside the major or a 
formal minor in a related field. 

Student Financial Support: Departmental teaching and research assistantships are 
available. Full and partial fellowships, which may include tuition and fees, are available 

97 



for excqjtional U. S. applicants. All financial aid recipients are selected on merit-based 
competition with other appUcants. AppUcations requesting financial aid should be re- 
ceived by March 1 for Fall admission and by September 1 for Spring admission. 

nuAnjjATK rmjR^FS 

Ce. 501 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 

CE502 TRAFFIC OPERATIONS. 

CE503 mGHWAY DESIGN. 

CE504 WATER TRANSPORTATION. 

CE 508 PUBUC WORKS ENGINEERING-OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION. 

CE 509 PUBUC WORKS ENGINEERING-ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 

CE510 AIRPORT PLANNING AND DESIGN. 

CE SIX, 512 CONTINUUM MECHANICS I, IL 

CE 513 THEORY OF ELASTICITY I. 

CE514 STRESS WAVES. 

CE 520 MATRIX AND FINITE ELEMENT STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS I. 

CE 521 ADVANCED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS. 

CE 522 ELASTIC STABILITY. 

CE 524 ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF MASONRY STRUCTURES. 

CE 527 ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF STRUCTURES FOR DYNAMIC LOADS. 

CE531 STRUCTURAL MODELS. 

CE 534 PLASTIC ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 

CE 536 THEORY AND DESIGN OF PRESTRESSED CONCRETE. 

CE 537 COMPUTER METHODS AND APPLICATIONS. 

CE 538 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND MODELING. 

CE(MEA) 541 GRAVITY WAVE THEORY I. 

CE544 FOUNDATION ENGINEERING. 

CE 548 ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF SOILS I. 

CE 549 SOIL AND SITE IMPROVEMENT. 

CE 551 THEORY OF CONCRETE MIXTURES. 

CE 553 ASPHALT AND BITUMINOUS MATERIALS. 

CE555 HIGHWAY PAVEMENT DESIGN. 

CE557 PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 

CE 559 INELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS. 

CE 561 CONSTRUCTION PLANNING AND SCHEDULING. 

CE 562 CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTIVITY. 

CE 563 MATERIALS MANAGEMENT IN CONSTRUCTION. 

CE 564 LEGAL ASPECTS OF CONTRACTING. 

CE 566 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS. 

CE 571 THEORY OF WATER AND WASTE TREATMENT. 

CE 572 DESIGN OF WATER AND WASTEWATER FACILITIES. 

CE 574 CHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS I. 

CE 575 MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 

CE 576 ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES OF AIR POLLUTION CONTROL. 

CE 577 ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT. 

CE(BAE) 578 AGRICULTURAL WASTE MANAGEMENT. 

CE580 FLOW IN OPEN CILVNNELS. 

CES82 COASTAL HYDRODYNAAflCS. 

CE 583 ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF COASTAL PROCESSES. 

CE584 HYDRAULICS OF GROUND WATER. 

CE585 URBAN STORMWATER MANAGEMENT. 

CE586 ENGINEERING HYDROLOGY. 

CE 589 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

CE 591, 592 CIVIL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. 

98 



CE 598 CIVIL ENGINEERING PROJECTS. 

CE 601 TRANSPORTATION PLANNING. 

CE 603 ADVANCED AIRPORT SYSTEMS DESIGN. 

CE 604 URBAN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING. 

CE 614 PLASTICITY AND LIMIT ANALYSIS. 

CE 615 FINITE DEFORMATION OF MATERIALS L 

CE 620 MATRIX AND FINITE ELEMENT STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. 

CE 623 THEORY OF PLATES AND SHELLS. 

CE 625, 626 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DESIGN I, II. 

CE 627 ADVANCED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF STRUCTURES FOR DYNAMIC LOADS. 

CE 628 EARTHQUAKE STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING. 

CE 632 PROBABILISTIC METHODS OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING. 

CE 635 ADVANCED THEORY OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES. 

CE 637 COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING SYSTEMS. 

CE 641, 642 ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS. 

CE 644 GROUND WATER CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT. 

CE 646 DYNAMICS OF SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS. 

CE 661 DESIGN OF TEMPORARY STRUCTURES. 

CE 665 ONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT SYSTEMS. 

CE 669 AUTOMATION AND ROBOTICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

CE 671 ADVANCED WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 

CE 672 ADVANCED WATER AND WASTE TREATMENT: PRINCIPLES AND DESIGN. 

CE 673 HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENT. 

CE 674 CHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS II. 

CE 681 BEHAVIOR AND ANALYSIS OF OCEAN STRUCTURES. 

CE 685 DESIGN OF COASTAL FACILITIES. 

CE 689 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

CE 698 ADVANCED READING IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

CE699 CIVIL ENGINEERING RESEARCH. 



Computer Engineering 



For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see electrical and computer 
engineering. 

Computer Science 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Computer Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. L. Tharp, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor R. A. Dwyer, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8206, (919) 515-2654, graduate@csc.ncsu.edu 

Distinguished University Research Professor: D. L. Bitzer 

Professors: W. Chou, R. J. Fomaro, R. E. Funderlic, D. F. McAllister, H. G. 
Perros, W. E. Robbins, C. D. Savage, W. J. Stewart, K. Tai; Adjunct Professor: 



99 



R. J. Plemmons; Professor Emeritus: D. C. Martin; Associate Professors: D, R. 
Bahler, W. R. Cleaveland, 11, E. W. Davis, Jr., E. F. Gehringer, T. L. Honeycutt, 
S. P. Iyer, D. S. Reeves, R. D. Rodman, M. F. M. Stallmann, M. A. V. Vouk; 
Ai^unct Associate Professor: K. D. Clark; Assistant Professors: J. C. Lester, M. P. 
Singh, S. F. Wu; Visiting Assistant Professor: G. N. Rouskas; A^'unct Assistant 
Professors: G. Q. Kenney, J. Mauney, K. J. Ulberg, A. O. Zaghlouf; Assistant 
Professors Emeriti: J. W. Hanson, N. F. Williamson 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: D. P. Agrawal, C. D. Meyer, Jr., W. E. Snyder; Associate Professors: J. 
W. Baugh Jr., I. Viniotis 

The department awarded its first graduate degrees in 1990 and has quickly assumed a 
respectable place among Ph.D. -granting computer science departments. The faculty has 
broad-ranging interests in software systems, computer communications and performance 
analysis, computer architecture, and combinatorial and numerical algorithms. 

Admission Requirements: Successful ^jpUcants have an accredited baccalaureate degree 
with a B average, including con^xiter scieace course work at least equivalent to a minor. 
Applicants must submit scores for the GRE General Tests and GRE Computer Science 
Subject Test. [Exception: Apphcants for the Master of Computer Science curriculum 
who do not desire financial aid may omit the Subject Test.] The department does not 
currently admit students on a provisional basis. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The M.S. requires two core courses and thesis research 
(typically six credits). The advisory committee may waive the thesis requirement for 
students who pass the Ph.D. qualiiying exams and complete specified course work in 
Ueu of research. The Master of Computer Science is a terminal professional degree 
granted upon successful conqjletion of 30 hours of course work, including three courses 
from the core hst: CSC 501, CSC 505, CSC 506 and CSC 522. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Ph.D. students normally complete 60 semester hours 
of post-baccalaurete course work. They must also complete written qualifying examina- 
tions in three broad areas (theoretical foundations, software systesm and architecture), 
individualized in-depth written and oral preliminary examinations, and a pubHc defense 
of a dissertation describing substantial original, independent scholarly work. 

Student Financial Support: A unique asset is the department's Lidustrial Assistantship 
Program, under which graduate students perform part-time work at local firms. During 
1995-96, this program supported five students, while 55 more held traditional teaching 
and research assistantships. Outstanding candidates may receive fellowships or be 
employed at lecturers. 



100 



Other Relevant Irtfonnation: Graduates at all levels are highly respected and well paid 
locally and elsewhere. Many M.S. and M.CSC. graduates begin or continue careers 
performing and supervising advanced sofbA'are development in and around the Research 
Triangle Park. Most recent Ph.D.s assumed positions of technical leadership in well- 
known large companies. Despite a competitive academic market, two assimied tenure- 
track faculty positions and two others declined such offers; two more pursued post- 
doctoral research. 

GRAniJATK rnvR^E^ 

CSC(ECE) 501 OPERATING SYSTEMS PRINCIPLES. 

CSC 502 COMPUTATIONAL UNGUISTICS. 

CSC (ECE) 505 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS. 

CSC(ECE) 506 ARCHITECTURE OF PARALLEL COMPUTERS. 

CSC(ECE) 510 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING. 

CSC 511 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE I. 

CSC 512 COMPILER CONSTRUCTION. 

CSC(ECE) 517 OBJECT-ORIENTED LANGUAGES AND SYSTEMS 

CSC 518 COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 

CSC 522 AUTOMATA, LANGUAGES AND COMPUTABILITY THEORY. 

CSC(MA) 529, 530 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I, II. 

CSC 541 ADVANCED DATA STRUCTURES. 

CSC 542 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 

CSC(IE) 546 MANAGEMENT DECISION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS. 

CSC(OR,IE) 562 COMPUTER SIMULATION TECHNIQUES. 

CSC(ECE) 570 TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 

CSC(ECE) 571 COMPUTER NETWORKS. 

CSC(ECE) 572 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER COMMUNICATIONS. 

CSC(ECE) 573 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PERFORMANCE MODELING. 

CSC 574 REAL TIME COMPUTER SYSTEMS. 

CSC(IE) 575 VOICE INTUT/OUTPUT COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS. 

CSC(MA,OR) 585 GRAPH THEORY. 

CSC 591 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 

CSC 593 INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 

CSC 602 COMPUTATIONAL SEMANTICS. 

CSC 606 CONCURRENT SOFTWARE SYSTEMS. 

CSC 611 ARTIFICIAL INTELUGENCE II. 

CSC(ECE) 640 PARALLEL PROCESSING. 

CSC(ECE) 671 ADVANCED COMPUTER PERFORMANCE MODELING. 

CSC(MA) 673 PARALLEL ALGORITHMS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTATION. 

CSC(IE) 675 ADVANCES IN VOICE INPUT/OUTPUT COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS. 

CSC(ECE) 676 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF COMPUTER NETWORKS. 

CSC(ECE) 677 TELECOMMUNICATIONS NETWORK DESIGN. 

CSC 691 ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 

CSC 693 ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 

CSC 699 COMPUTER SCIENCE RESEARCH. 



101 



Counselor Education 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., M.Ed. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. B. Baker, Head of the Department 
Box 7801, (919) 515-2244, sbaker@poe.coe.ncsu.edu 

Professors: J. A. Anderson, E. R. Gerler Jr., L. K. Jones, D. C. Lx>cke; Professor 
Emeritus: N. A. Sprinthall; Associate Professors: H. A. Exum, T. L. Robinson; 
Visiting Associate Professor: T. H. Stafford Jr.; Associate Professors Emeriti: J. G. 
McVay, B. C. Talley Jr.; Assistant Professor: S.-M. Ting; Adjunct Assistant 
Professor: J. S. Hall 

Admission Requirements: Requirements include a 3.00 average (4.00 scale) in the 
junior and s^or years of the undergraduate program and one year of work experience 
in a human services capacity. The best-qualified appUcants will be accepted up to the 
number of spaces that are available for new students. Exceptions to the minimum 
grade-point average may be made for students with special backgrounds, abihties and 
interests. 

Admission requirements for the Ph.D. program include, in addition to the general 
admission requiranaits, a 48-semester-hour master's degree, the completion of a work 
sample and a personal interview. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A minimum of 48 semester hours are required in all 
master's degree tracks. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Approximately 60 semester hours of required course 
work in the Ph.D. program in counselor education includes courses in research, 
bdiavioral scioaces foundation, counselor education theory and professional apphcation. 

Other Relevant lr\formation: The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related 
Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the 
Council on Post-secondaiy Accreditation (COP A), has conferred accreditation to the fol- 
lowing program areas in the Department of Counselor Education: student development 
in higher education (M.S., M.Ed.) and the Ph.D. program in covmselor education. 
These program area have admission and curriculimi requirements that conform to 
CACREP standards. The school counseling and community/agency tracks (M.S., 
M.Ed.) are CACREP-like in preparation for being accredited by CACREP. 



102 



GRAnUATF rnuR^Ffi 

ECD 520 INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING. 

ECD 521 INTERNSinP IN GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL SERVICES. 

ECD 522 INTERNSfflP IN COLLEGE STUDENT DEVELOPMENT. 

ECD 523 INTERNSfflP IN AGENCY COUNSELING. 

ECD 524 CAREER COUNSELING AND DEVELOPMENT. 

ECD 530 THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES OF COUNSELING. 

ECD 533 GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 

ECD 534 GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING IN ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

ECD 535 STUDENT DEVELOPMENT IN fflGHER EDUCATION. 

ECD 536 COMMUNITY SERVICE AGENCIES. 

ECD 540 GENDER ISSUES IN COUNSELING. 

ECD 560 RESEARCH AND ASSESSMENT IN COUNSELING. 

ECD 590 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN GUIDANCE. 

ECD 599 RESEARCH PROJECTS IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION. 

ECD 621 INTERNSfflP IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION. 

ECD 625 CROSS CULTURAL COUNSELING. 

ECD 631 CAREER DEVELOPMENT THEORY AND RESEARCH. 

ECD 636 OBSERVATION AND SUPERVISED FIELD WORK. 

ECD 637 SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE-DEVELOPMENTAL THEORY AND PRACTICE. 

ECD 638 SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE-DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH. 

ECD 639 GROUP COUNSELING. 

ECD 640 PREPRACTICUM IN COUNSELING. 

ECD 641 PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING. 

ECD 643 THE AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENT. 

ECD 666 SUPERVISION OF COUNSELING. 

ECD 686 PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING. 

ECD 699 THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 

Crop Science 

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D, M.S., Master of Agriculture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. A. Knauft, Head of the Department 
Professor R. C. Rufty, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7620, (919) 515-3667, becky_rufty: ncsu.edu 

Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: M. M. 

Goodman 

Philip Morris Professor: G, F. Peedin 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: E. A. Wernsman 

Professors: J. R. Anderson, Jr., D. T. Bowman, A. H. Bruneau, B. E. Caldwell, 
H. D. Coble, F. T. Corbin, E. J. Dunphy, E. L. Fiscus, J. T. Green, Jr., R. E. 
Jarrett, H. M. Linker, R. C. Long, J. P. Mueller, J. P. Murphy, R. P. Patterson, 
C. H. Peacock, W. D. Smith, H. T. Stalker Jr., J. B. Weber, W. W. Weeks, G. G. 



103 



Wilkereon, J. C. Wynne, A. C. York; Professors (USDA): J. C. Burns, J. W. Burton, 
T. E. Carter Jr., D. S. Fisher, S. C. Huber, J. E. Miller, D. E. Moreland, R. F. 
Wilson; Visiting Professor: T. W. Rufty Jr.; A^unct Professor: K. D. Getsinger; 
Professors Emeriti: C. T. Blake, C. A. Brim, D. S. Chamblee, J. F. Chaplin, W. K. 
Collins, W. A. Cope, D. A. Emery, W. T. Fike, Jr., D. U. Gerstel, W. B. Gilbert, W. 
C. Gregory, H. D. Gross, G. R. Gwynn, P. H. Harvey, G. L. Jones, J. A. Lee, W. 
M. Lewis, R. P. Moore, D. H. Timothy, J. A. Weybrew, A. D. Worsham; Associate 
Professors: D. C. Bowman, R. J. Cooper, D. A. Danehower, T. G. Isleib, S. H. 
Kay, R. D. Keys, V. A. Sisson, J. F. Spears, A. K. Weissinger, R. Wells, J. W. 
Wilcut; Associate Professors (USDA): K. O. Burkey, P. Kwanyuen, D. P. Livingston, 
in, P. H. Sisco Jr.; Assistant Professors: R. E. Dewey, K.L. Edmisten, G. P. Fenner, 
R. W. Heiniger, J.-M. Luginbuhl, F. H. Yelverton; Visiting Research Assistant 
Professor: L. A. Urban 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: W. F. Thompson, C. T. Young; Professor (USDA): C. W. Stuber 

Areas of specialization include plant breeding, crop production and physiology, forage 
crops ecology, turfgrass science, weed science, agro-ecology and plant chemistry. 

Excellent facihties for graduate training are available. Many special facilities such as 
preparation rooms for plant and soil samples, cold storage facihties for plant material, 
greenhouse space, growth control chambers, computer local area network, and access 
to the plant environment laboratory (Phytotron) are provided if required. 

Research farms located throughout North Carolina include a variety of soil and climatic 
conditions needed for experiments in plant breeding, crop management, forage ecology, 
turfgrass management and physiology, and weed control. 

Strong supporting departments increase opportunities for broad and thorough training. 
Graduate students in crop science work coof>eratively with or obtain instruction in the 
Departments of Biochemistry, Botany, Chemistry, Computer Science, Entomology, 
Horticultural Science, Genetics, Mathematics, Microbiology, Plant Pathology, Soil 
Science and Statistics. 

Admissions Requirements: To be admitted, a student should be a graduate of an 
accredited major in agronomy, biology, crop science, genetics, horticulture, plant 
science or related field of study. Graduates of other programs may be admitted but will 
be required to make up certain undergraduate deficiencies without graduate credit. 
Accqjtance of apphcants is conqietitive and limited by program space for new students. 
Exceptions to the 3.0 GPA may be made for students with special backgrounds, abihties 
or interests. 



104 



Master's Degree Requirements: One hour of Crop Science Seminar (CS 690) and a 
minimum of 6 credit hours at the 600 level is required for M.S. candidates. A minimum 
of 4 hours of special problems (CS 591) is required for the M.Ag. degree. An exit 
seminar presentation to the department is required. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Course requirements for students are determined 
through the graduate advisory committee process. Core courses have been identified for 
students studying physiology, management, production, weed science and plant growth 
regulation. An exit seminar presentation to the department is required. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate assistantships and fellowships can be awarded to 
qualified apphcants dep>ending on funding availabihty and program space. Nonresident 
tuition may be waived for students granted assistantships. 

Other Relevant Ij\formation: A thesis (M.S. and Ph.D.) or special problems (M.Ag.) 
outline and graduate plan of work should be submitted to the Director of Graduate 
Programs by the end of the first regular (spring or fall) semester. 

CrRAniJATE COURSES 

CS511 TOBACCO TECHNOLOGY. 

CS 513 PHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF CROP PRODUCTION. 

CS(HS) 515 WEED SCIENCE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES. 

CS(HS)516 WEED BIOLOGY. 

CS(HS) 517 WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 

CS(HS) 518 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS. 

CS(GN,HS) 541 PLANT BREEDING METHODS. 

CS(GN,HS) 542 PLANT BREEDING LABORATORY. 

CS(GN,HS) 543 PLANT BREEDING LABORATORY. 

CS(FOR,SSC) 577 CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT I. 

CS591 SPECIAL PROBLEMS. 

CS(GN,HS) 615 QUANTITATIVE GENETICS IN PLANT BREEDING. 

CS(GN,HS) 616 BREEDING METHODS. 

CS(GN,HS,PP) 618 BREEDING FOR PEST RESISTANCE. 

CS(GN) 619 ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF CULTIVATED PLANTS. 

CS(GN,HS) 620 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY IN PLANT BREEDING. 

CS(HS,SSC,TOX) 625 PESTICIDE CHEMISTRY. 

CS(HS,SSC,TOX) 627 PESTICIDE BEHAVIOR AND FATE IN THE ENVIRONMENT. 

CS(HS) 629 HERBICIDE BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS. 

CS690 SEMINAR. 

CS699 RESEARCH. 



105 



Curriculum and Instruction 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., M.Ed. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. L. Crossland, Head of the Department 
Professor B. J. Fox, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7801, (919) 515-3221, fox@poe.coe.ncsu.edu 

Professors: D. A. Cullinan, P. H. Martorella, B. R. Poulton; Adjunct Professors: D. 
D. Copeland, R. A. Edelfelt.; Professor Emeritus: B. M. Parramore; Associate 
Professors: J. F. Arnold, T. P. O'Brien, S. S. Osborne, C. A. Pope, R. J. Pritchard, 
M. B. Richards, E. J. Sabomie, H. A. Spires, E. S. Vasu; Clinical Associate 
Professor: A. J. Reiman; Adjunct Associate Professor: H. A. Fingeret; Associate 
Professors Emeriti: P. J. Rust, L. Thies-Sprinthall; Assistant Professors: P. L. 
Marshall; Visiting Assistant Professors: L. G. Aubrecht, M. Terhaar-Yonkers; A^unct 
Assistant Professor: S. B. Buckner 

Admission Requirements: A 500-800 word statement describing professional goals. 
Some areas of study require that apphcants be qualified to hold a baccalaureate-level 
teaching certificate or have teaching experience. ORE scores not more than five years 
old for the doctoral program, except when scores older than five years are associated 
with a master's degree completed within five years of the doctoral apphcation. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A minimum of 36 course credit hours, a written 
examination and a final oral examination are required. The Master of Science degree 
requires a thesis approved by the graduate committee. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: A minimum of 60 course credit hours which includes 
15-18 hours of research and a curriculum specialty and 12 hours of dissertation credit. 

Student Financial Support: No financial aid is available on a regular basis. 

Other Relevant Information: The department offers master's degrees in curriculum and 
instruction with areas of concentration in elementary education, EngUsh education, read- 
ing, instmctional technology -computers, marketing education, social studies and super- 
vision and the Master of Education in agricultural education. Master's degrees in special 
education are offered in the areas of behavior disorders, learning disabihties and mental 
retardation. A master's degree in middle grades education includes a diaal concentration 
in language arts and social studies. 



106 



nuAniiATF rniJR^ER 

ECI 501 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN INSTRUCTION. 

ECI502 THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM. 

ECI 504 SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

ECI 506 EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN. 

ECI 507 FOUNDATIONS OF MIDDLE YEARS EDUCATION. 

ECI 508 EDUCATION OF SEVERELY HANDICAPPED. 

ECI 509 METHODS AND MATERIALS-TEACfflNG RETARDED CHILDREN. 

ECI 519 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 

ECI 524 TEACHERS AND THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM. 

ECI 525 THEORY AND PRACTICE IN TEACHING DIVERSE POPULATIONS. 

ECI 531 MENTAL RETARDATION. 

ECI 542 CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES IN THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES. 

ECI 544 THE TEACIDNG OF COMPOSITION. 

ECI 545 READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

ECI 546 READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS. 

ECI 547 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

ECI 548 DEVELOPMENT OF MICROCOMPUTER SOFTWARE FOR INSTRUCTION. 

ECI 551 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF SUPERVISION. 

ECI 556 LEARNING DISABILITIES. 

ECI 557 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN LEARMNG DISABIUTIES. 

ECI 558 RESOURCE TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. 

ECI 561 EDUCATIONAL DIAGNOSIS ANT) PRESCRIPTION FOR dHLDREN WITH 

EXCEPTIONALITIES. 
ECI 562 COMMUNICATION DISORDERS IN THE CLASSROOM. 
ECI 564 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. 
ECI 571 INTRODUCTION TO THE GIFTED INDIVIDUAL. 
ECI 572 METHODS FOR TEACHING THE GIFTED. 
ECI 573 BEHAVIOR DISORDERS. 

ECI 574 METHODS AND MATERIALS: BEHAVIOR DISORDERS. 
ECI 576 TEACHING/LEARNING APPROACHES FOR EMERGING ADOLESCENTS. 
ECI 583 DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS. 
ECI 591 TEACHING LITERATURE FOR YOUNG ADULTS. 
ECI 598 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION. 
ECI 599 RESEARCH PROJECTS IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION. 
ECI 602 CURRICULUM THEORY AND DEVELOPMENT. 
ECI 606 REMEDIATION OF READING DISABILITIES. 
ECI 614 LITERACY INSTRUCTION FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS: RESEARCH, THEORY AND 

PRACTICE. 
ECI 620 INTERNSHIP IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION. 
ECI 621 INTERNSHIP IN READING EDUCATION. 
ECI 622 INTERNSraP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. 
ECI 623 INTERNSHIP IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION. 
ECI 624 INTERNSHIP IN MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION. 
ECI 625 INTERNSHIP IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY - COMPUTERS. 
ECI 626 INTERNSIHP IN SOCIAL STUDIES. 
ECI 627 INTERNSHIP IN MENTORING. 
ECI 634 DIAGNOSIS OF READING DISABILITIES. 
ECI 640 PRACTICUM IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION. 
ECI 641 DIAGNOSTIC-PRESCRIPTIVE PRACTICUM IN READING. 
ECI 642 PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. 
ECI 643 PRACTICUM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION. 
ECI 644 PRACTICUM IN MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION. 
ECI 645 PRACTICtTM IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY - COMPUTERS. 
ECI 646 PRACTICUM IN SOCIAL STUDIES. 



107 



ECI 647 PRACTICUM IN MENTORING OF TEACHERS. 

ECI 648 THEORY AND PROCESS IN READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS. 

ECI 652 RESEARCH APPLICATIONS IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION. 

ECI 653 EFFECTIVE TEACHING. 

ECI 655 TRANSITION PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS WITH MILD DISABILITIES. 

ECI 657 THEORY AND RESEARCH ON TEACHING AND LEARNING SOCIAL STUDIES. 

ECI 665 INSTRUCTIONAL SUPERVISION OF TEACHERS. 

ECI 687 SEMINAR IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION. 

ECI 690 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN READING. 

ECI 699 THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 

Economics 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., M.A., Master of Economics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. A. Brandt, Head of the Department of Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 

Professor R. B. Palmquist, Head of the Department of Economics 

Professor R. M. Fearn, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8110, (919) 515-7156, bob_feam@ncsu.edu 

Professors: S.G. Allen, G. A. Carlson, R. L. Clark, L. E. Danielson, J. E. Easley Jr., 
E. W. Erickson, E. A. Estes, D. Fisher, D. J. Flath, T. J. Grennes, A. R. Hall, D. M. 
Holthauser Jr., D. N. Hyman, L. A. Ihnen, T. Johnson, C. R. Knoeber, S. E. 
Margolis, C. L. Moore Sr., E. C. Pasour Jr., D. K. Pearce, R. A. Schrimper, J. J. 
Seater, M. L. Walden, M. K. Wohlgenant; Professors Emeriti: R. C. Brooks, A. J, 
Coutu, R. D. Dahle, D. M. Hoover, R. A. King, H. L. Liner, P. R. Johnson, T. E. 
Nichols Jr., B. M. Olsen, R. J. Peeler, C. R. Pugh, J. A. Seagraves, R. L. Simmons, 
J. G. Sutherland, W. D. Toussaint, CD. Turner, R. C. Wells, J. C. WiUiamson Jr. ; 
Associate Professors: D. S. Ball, J. C. Beghin, G. A. Benson, L. A. Craig, P. L. 
Fackler, W. E. Foster, B. Goodwin, A. E. Headen Jr., J. S. Lapp, M. B. McEhoy, C. 
M. Newmark, C. D. Safley, W. N. Thurman, W. J. Wessels, K. D. Zering; Associate 
Professor Emeriti: H. C. Gilliam Jr.; Assistant Professors: A. B. Brown, A. W. 
Oltmans, M. A. Renkow, T. C. Tsoulouhas, T. Vukina 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professor: D. A. Dickey; Associate Professors: J. C. Dutton Jr., E. A. McDermed 

The economics graduate program is a joint program of the Department of Agricultural 
and Resource Economics and the Department of Economics. Emphasis is placed on 
economic theory and quantitative economic analysis and their apphcation to economic 
problems. The major fields of specialization are: agricultural economics, econometrics. 



108 



environmental-resource economics, industrial organization, international economics, 
labor economics and macro-monetary economics. 

Admission Requirements: Minimum background for admission includes intermediate 
microeconomics and macroeconomics, at least one semester of calculus (two for Ph.D.) 
and undergraduate statistics. Some students are admitted conditional on their taking 
certain prerequisites. The submission of GRE scores is strongly recommended and is 
required for students applying for financial aid. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The Master of Science in agricultural economics and 
the Master of Arts in economics require core courses in microeconomics (ECG 501), 
macroeconomics (ECG 502), statistics (ST 514) and apphed econometrics (ECG 561). 
The Master of Economics has the same core courses requirements but does not have a 
thesis requirement. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The Ph.D. program has no specific hour requirements 
but at least six semesters of work beyond the bachelor's degree are required. Students 
must pass writt«i compreh^isive examinations in microeconomics and macroeconomics. 
Course requirements include two semesters of econometrics and six field courses. An 
outside minor can substitute for two of the field courses. 

Student Financial Support: Research and teaching assistantships are available and are 
awarded on a competitive basis. Most of these assistantships go to Ph.D. students. 
Students applying for assistantships are advised to apply by February 15 for fall 
admission. 

Other Relevant Ir\formation: Graduate students on financial support are provided office 
space or study carrels. Other students may be assigned study carrels if available. All 
students have access to the economics graduate student computer lab. 

GRAniJATE rniJRSES 

ECG 501 PRICE THEORY. 

ECG 502 INCOME AND EMPLOYMENT THEORY. 

ECG(PRT) 503 ECONOMICS OF RECREATION. 

ECG 504 MONETARY AND FINANCIAL MACROECONOMICS. 

ECG 505 APPLIED MICROECONOMIC ANALYSIS. 

ECG 506 APPLIED MACROECONOMIC ANALYSIS. 

ECG 507 MICROECONO\aCS AND THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT. 

ECG 508 MACROECONOMICS AND THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT. 

ECG 512 LAW AND ECONOMICS. 

ECG 515 ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE POLICY. 

ECG 521 MARKETS AND TRADE. 

ECG 523 PLANNING FARM AND AREA ADJUSTMENTS. 

ECG 533 ECONOMICS OF WORLD FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL POLICY. 

ECG 537 HEALTH ECONOMICS. 

ECG 540 ECONOAflC DEVELOPMENT. 



109 



ECG 551 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION ECONOMICS. 

ECG555 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS. 

ECG(ST) 561 INTERMEDIATE ECONOMETRICS. 

ECS 562 TOPICS IN APPLIED ECONOMETRICS. 

ECG 565 MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMICS. 

ECG 570 ANALYSIS OF AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY. 

ECG 590 SPECIAL ECONOMICS TOPICS. 

ECG 598 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN ECONOMICS. 

ECG 600 ADVANCED PRICE THEORY. 

ECG 601 PRICES, VALUE AND WELFARE. 

ECG 602 ADVANCED INCOME AND EMPLOYMENT THEORY. 

ECG 603 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT. 

ECG 604 MONETARY ECONOMICS. 

ECG 606 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AJVD CONTROL. 

ECG 607 TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION. 

ECG 610 THEORY OF PUBLIC FINANCE. 

ECG 615 ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS. 

ECG 616 TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS. 

ECG 630 LABOR ECONOMICS. 

ECG 631 POLICY AND RESEARCH ISSUES IN LABOR ECONOMICS. 

ECG 640 ADVANCED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 

ECG 641 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND SUPPLY. 

ECG 642 CONSUMPTION, DEMAND AND MARKET INTERDEPENDENCY. 

ECG 648 THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE. 

ECG 649 MONETARY ASPECTS OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE. 

ECG 650 ECONOMIC DECISION THEORY. 

ECG(ST)651 ECONOMETRICS. 

ECG(ST) 652 TOPICS IN ECONOMETRICS. 

ECG 682 ADVANCED MACROECONOMICS. 

ECG 684 MONETARY THEORY. 

ECG 699 RESEARCH IN ECONOMICS. 

Educational Research and Policy Analysis 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see adult and community col- 
lege education. 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M. S., Master of Electrical Engmeering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. M. Kolbas, Head of the Department 

Professor W. E. Alexander, Director of Graduate Programs 

Visiting Professor J. W. Mink, Graduate Coordinator 

Box 7911, (919) 515-5091; winser@eos.ncsu.edu; jwm@ecegrad.ncsu.edu 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor: J. B. O'Neal Jr. 
University Professor: D. R. Rhodes 

110 



Professors: D. P. Agrawal, B. J. Baliga, S. M. Bedair, R. K. Cavin m, W. Chou, 
T. H. GlissonJr., J. J. Grainger, J. R. Hauser, J. F. Kauffbian, M. A. Littlejohn, R. 
Luo, N. A. Masnari, N. F. Matthews, T. K. Miller, m, L. K. Monteith, H. T. Nagle 
Jr., A. A, J. Nilsson, C. M. Osbum, S. A. Rajala, A. Reisman, W. E. Snyder, H. 
J. Trussell, J. J. Wortman; Visiting Professors: F. Brglez, G. W. Rubloff, J. R. Suttle; 
Adjunct Professors: S. E. Kerns, J. W. Keyes Jr., M. A. Strocsio, R. J. Trew; 
Professors Emeriti: W. J. Barclay, A. R. Eckels, A. J, Goetze, D. R. Rhodes; 
Associate Professors: S. T. Alexander, G. L. Bilbro, M. Chow, P. D. Franzon, 
E. F. Gehringer, R. S. Gyurcsik, A. W. Kelley, K. W. Kim, W. Liu, M. C. 
Ozturk, D. S. Reeves, M. B. Steer, J. K. Townsend, I. Viniotis, M. W. White; 
Visiting Associate Professor: J. J. Brickley; Adjunct Associate Professors: J. R. 
Burice, J, R. Jones, S. S. Lee, J. J. Paulos, D. Temple; Associate Professors Emeriti: 
G. F. Bland, E. G. Manning, W, C. Peterson; Assistant Professors: M. E. Baran, T. 
M. Conte, A. Duel-Hallen, C. S. Gloster Jr., P. K. McLarty; Visiting Assistant 
Professors: R. T. Kuehn, X. Xu; Adjunct Assistant Professors: D. L. Dreifiis, C. A. 
Hamilton, A. J. Rindos m, P. L Santago, J. C. Sutton III,C. K. WiUiams 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: D. L. Bitzer, S. Khorram, D. F. McAUister, J. Narayan, H. G. Perros, W. 
E. Robbins, J. F. Schetzina, K. Tai; Associate Professors: E. W. Davis Jr., M. F. M. 
StaUmann, M. A. V. Vouk 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL ADJUNCT GRADUATE FACULTY 

S. Chen, K. Daneshvar, J. H. Kim, P. Lala, R. Z. Makki 

Admissions Requirements: Admission to the M.S. program requires a B.S. in electrical 
aogineering, con^xiter aigineering or computer science, an overall undergraduate GPA 
of at least 3.2, The minimum acceptable TOEFL score for admission to the M.S. 
program is 575. Admission is further limited by available room in the elected program 
of study and meeting the minimum above requirements alone does not guarantee 
admission. 

Admission to the Ph.D. program requires a B.S. or M.S. in electrical engineering, 
con^xiter aigineering or conqxiter science with an overall GPA of at least 3.5. (NOTE: 
Only exceptional students are admitted without first having an M.S. degree.) The 
minimum acceptable TOEFL score for admission to the Ph.D. program is 625. Admis- 
sion is further limited by available room in the elected program of study, and meeting 
the minimum requirements as given above does not guarantee admission. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A thesis is optional. Students electing the Option B 
non-thesis option must meet core course requirements and have at least six credit hours 
of 600-level ECE courses. 



Ill 



Doctoral Degree Requirements: Approximately 30 credit hours are required beyond the 
M.S. degree or 60 credit hours beyond the B.S. degree. A minimum of 21 of the 30 
credit hours or a minimum of 45 of the 60 credit hours must be in scheduled courses. 
A minor is not required but may be elected. Additional course restrictions apply if a 
minor is not elected. 

The department wishes to evaluate a Ph.D. student's research potential as quickly as 
possible. Consequently, all Ph.D. students are required to pass a quaUiying review be- 
fore the end of their third semester of study. This review is based on the student's 
academic j)erformance to date and the results of a project with one of their committee 
members. Results are presented to the committee in both written and oral form. Based 
on this review, the committee will decide if the student may continue in the Ph.D. 
program. 

Student Financial Support: The depaitm^it offers financial support to qualified students 
in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships, fellowships and tuition 
remission. 

nRAniJATE rOJJRSFS 

ECE (CSC) 501 OPERATING SYSTEMS PRINCIPLES. 

ECE 503 INSTRUMENTATION CIRCUITS. 

ECE(CSC) 505 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS. 

ECE(CSC) 506 ARCHITECTURE OF PARALLEL COMPUTERS. 

ECE(CSC) 510 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING. 

ECE 511 ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 

ECE 513 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING. 

ECE 514 RANDOM PROCESSES. 

ECE 515 DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS. 

ECE 516 SYSTEM CONTROL ENGINEERING. 

ECE 520 FUNDAMENTALS OF LOGIC SYSTEMS. 

ECE 521 DIGITAL COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN. 

ECE 525 OPTICAL SIGNAL PROCESSING. 

ECE 530 PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS. 

ECE 531 PRINCIPLES OF TRANSISTOR DEVICES. 

ECE 532 PRINCIPLES OF MICROWAVE CIRCUITS. 

ECE 533 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS. 

ECE 537 CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH-SPEED DEVICES. 

ECE 538 INTEGRATED CIRCUITS TECHNOLOGY AND FABRICATION. 

ECE 539 INTEGRATED CIRCUITS TECHNOLOGY AND FABRICATION LABORATORY. 

ECE 540 ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS. 

ECE 544 DESIGN OF ELECTRONIC PACKAGING AND INTERCONNECTS. 

ECE 546 VLSI SYSTEMS DESIGN. 

ECE 547 VLSI ARCIHTECTURE. 

ECE 550 POWER SYSTEM OPERATION AND CONTROL. 

ECE(PY) 552 INTRODUCTION TO THE STRUCTURE OF SOLIDS. 

ECE 557 PRINCIPLES OF MOS TRANSISTORS. 

ECE 558 DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING. 

ECE 559 PATTERN RECOGNITION. 

ECE(CSC)570 TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 

ECE(CSC)571 COMPUTER NETWORKS. 

112 



ECE(CSC) 572 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER COMMUNICATIONS. 

ECE(CSC) 573 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PERFORMANCE MODELLING. 

ECE 578 OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS. 

ECE 591, 592 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

ECE 593 INDIVIDUAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

ECE 601 ANALOG VLSL 

ECE 603 COMPUTER-AIDED CIRCUIT ANALYSIS. 

ECE 604 LOGIC DESIGN FOR TESTABILITY. 

ECE<CSC) 606 CONCURRENT SOFTWARE SYSTEMS. 

ECE 613 ADVANCED FEEDBACK CONTROL. 

ECE 619 MICROWAVE CIRCUITS DESIGN. 

ECE 622 ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF SOLID-STATE MATERIALS. 

ECE 623 OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF SEMICONDUCTORS. 

ECE 624 ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF SOLID-STATE DEVICES. 

ECE 625 ADVANCED SOLID-STATE DEVICE THEORY. 

ECE<PY) 627 SEMICONDUCTOR THIN FILMS TECHNOLOGY. 

ECE 628 PREPARATION OF ELECTRONIC MATERIALS. 

ECE 629 GROWTH OF THIN FILMS FROM THE VAPOR PILVSE. 

ECE 632 POWER SYSTEM STABILITY AND CONTROL. 

ECE 633 COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF LARGE-SCALE POWER SYSTEMS. 

ECE(CSC) 640 PARALLEL PROCESSING. 

ECE 641 SEQUENTIAL MACHINES. 

ECE 642 ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS. 

ECE 643 ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCIHTECTURE. 

ECE 644 FAULT TOLERANT COMPUTING. 

ECE 646 HIGH PERFORMANCE VLSI DESIGN. 

ECE 647 MULTIDIMENSIONAL DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING. 

ECE 650 DESIGN AUTOMATION FOR VLSI. 

ECE 651 DETECTION AND ESTIMATION THEORY. 

ECE 652 ADVANCED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS. 

ECE 658 DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING. 

ECE 659 COMPUTER VISION. 

ECE<CSC) 671 ADVANCED COMPUTER PERFORMANCE MODELLING. 

ECE(CSC) 676 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF COMPUTER NETWORKS. 

ECE(CSC) 677 TELECOMMUNICATIONS NETWORK DESIGN. 

ECE 691, 692 SPECIAL STUDIES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

ECE 693 INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

ECE 699 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH. 



Electrical Engineering 



For a listing of graduate faculty and program iofonnation, see electrical and computer 
engineering. 



Elementary Education 



For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see curriculum and 
instruction. 



113 



Engineering 

Visiting Professor M. M. Fikry, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7902, (919)515-5440 

The College of Engineering offers a program leading to the Master of Engineering. 
This is primarily an off-campus program. This Option B program requires 30 credit 
hours and has no residoicy, iinal oral examination or thesis requirements. Requirements 
also include two core courses and a minimum of three courses in a specific concentra- 
tion. A minimum of five courses, selected from a hst specified and approved by the 
designating dspaitxaeot, is required for a designated concentration on the transcript. The 
ViedoBased Engineering Education (VBEE) program offers, each semester, courses, 
live or by videotape, which may be appUed toward the degree. 

English 

Degrees Offered: M.A. in English, M.S. in Technical Communication 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. D. Lisk, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor H. C. West, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8105, (919) 515-4107, west@social.chass.ncsu.edu 

Associate Professor S. B. Katz, Coordinator, M. S. in Technical Communication 

William C. Friday Distinguished Professor: W. A. Wolfram 

Professors: B. J. Baines, G. W. Barrax, J. W. Clark Jr., J. D. Durant, J. A. Gomez, 
J. M. Grimwood, A. H. Harrison, M. T. Hester, L. T. Holley, J. J. Kessel, L. H. 
MacKethan, W. E. Meyers, C. R. Miller, C. A. PrioU, M. S. Reynolds, L. Smith, 
J. J. Smoot, A. F. Stein, J. N. Wall Jr., R. V. Young Jr.; Professors Emeriti: P. E, 
Blank Jr., L. S. Champion, M. Halperen, H. G. Kincheloe, A. S. Knowles, B. G. 
Koonce Jr., F. H. Moore, W. B. Toole m, M. C. WiUiams, P. J. WiUiams; Associate 
Professors: L. J. Betts Jr., M. P. Carter, D. H. Covington, J. Ferster, C. Gross, M. 
F. King, R. C. Kochersberger Jr. , D. L. Laryea, C. Nwankwo, M. E. N. Orr, A. M. 
Penrose, J. O. Pettis, J. J. Small, D. B. Wyrick; Associate Professors Emeriti: E. 
D. Clark, Sr., E. P. Dandridge Jr., H. A. Hargrave, C. E. Moore, N. G. Smith; 
Assistant Professors: E. Y. Amiran, A. Davis-Gardner, C. R. Haller, M. Halperen, 
D. J. Herman, R. C. Lane, L. S. May, B. S. Mehlenbacher, J. D. Morillo, J. E. 
Morrison, M. T. Pramaggiore, S. M. Setzer, L. R. Severin, E. R. Thomas, J. F. 
Thompson 



114 



ENGLISH: The Master of Arts program offers course work in English and American 
literature, rhetoric and composition, linguistics and creative writing. It can serve either 
as a complete course of study or as the first year of study toward a doctoral degree at 
another institution. 

Admission Requirements: Applicants should submit GRE scores (General Aptitute Test) 
and a writing sample. Undergraduate preparation should include 24 semester hours in 
EngUsh, with 12 of these hours in upj>er-division Uterature courses. 

Requirements for M.A. in EngUsh: All students take a distribution of four courses, one 
each in English Uterature before 1660, English hterature after 1660, American Uterature 
and a fourth category including composition theory, rhetoric, linguistics and Uterary 
theoiy. M addition, all students must take an introduction to research and bibUography, 
pass a language requirement, write a thesis and pass an oral exam on the thesis 
research. 

Beyond these basic requirements, the program permits several emphases. Students 
interested primarily in the study of Uterature take additional courses in Uterature for a 
total of eight courses. Students interested in creative writing may substitute three 
workshops in creative writing for two Uterature courses and present a creative work or 
series of short works as their thesis. Students interested in the study and teaching of 
writing may take the composition concentration, which requires specific courses in 
composition, rhetoric and linguistics; the thesis is on a topic in one of these areas. 
Students interested in language structure and variation may take the Linguistics 
concentration, which requires four courses in language study and five courses in 
Uterature. The thesis may be pure linguistics or its appUcation in rhetoric, composition 
or Uterature. 

Student Financial Support: Teaching assistantships are available for promising students. 
These students take a course in teaching Freshman EngUsh (ENG 696) in the faU 
semester and, under the supervision of experienced teachers, devote half time in 
subsequent semesters to teaching freshman composition. ENG 696 gives graduate credit 
but does not count toward fulfillment of degree requirements. 

Other Relevant Information: For students who hold "A" certification from the N. C. 
Department of PubUc Uistruction the department offers the M.A. with Graduate ("G") 
Certification requiring 30 semester hours of graduate credit in EngUsh, as outlined 
above, and 9 semester hours of graduate credit in Education. Students and faculty in the 
Department of English are eUgible for feUowships to participate in programs sponsored 
by the Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies, which is located 
in Washington, DC, at the Folger Shakespeare Library. 

TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION: The Master of Science in technical 
communication is designed to prepare professional communicators for advanced 

115 



positions in industry and research organizations; with appropriate electives, students can 
pr^jare for careers in software documaitation, environmental communication, industrial 
training in writing and editing, pubhcations management and related areas. 

Admission Requirements: AppUcants should submit a resume and a writing sample. 
Prerequisites for the program are basic editing, technical writing and computer literacy 
(ENG 214, ENG 331, and CSC 200). 

Requirements for M.S. in Technical Communication: The program requires 33 
semester hours: four courses in EngUsh (in the fields of writing, rhetoric and linguis- 
tics), one in communication, one in visual media, one in technical methods and three 
electives selected to complement the student's professional goals. Students must also 
satisfy a requirement for one semester of professional work experience. 

Student Financial Support: Teaching assistantships are available for promising students. 
These studaats take a course in teaching technical communication (ENG 697) in the fall 
semester and, under the supervision of experienced teachers, devote half time in 
subsequent semesters to teaching technical communication. ENG 697 gives graduate 
credit but does not count toward fulfillment of degree requirements. 

nRAnuATR rnriRSES 

ENG 515 AMERICAN COLONIAL UTERATURE. . 

ENG 517 ADVANCED TECHNICAL WRITING AND EDITING. 

ENG 524 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS. 

ENG 525 VARIETY IN LANGUAGE 

ENG 527 CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS. 

ENG(FL)S40 SEMINAR IN WORLD UTERATURE. 

ENG 561 MILTON. 

ENG 575 SOUTHERN WRITERS. 

ENG 578 ENGLISH DRAMA TO 1642. 

ENG 579 RESTORATION AND 18TH-CENTURY DRAMA. 

ENG 588 FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP. 

ENG 589 POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP. 

ENG 609 OLD ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

ENG 610 MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

ENG 611 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN COMPOSITION. 

ENG 612 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING. 

ENG 613 EMPIRICAL RESEARCH IN COMPOSITION. 

ENG(COM) 614 HISTORY OF RHETORIC 

ENG 615 RHETORIC OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 

ENG(COM) 616 RHETORICAL CRITICISM: THEORY AND PRACTICE. 

ENG 617 ONLINE INFORMATION DESIGN AND EVALUATION. 

ENG 620 16TH-CENTURY NON-DRAMATIC ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

ENG 624 MODERN ENGLISH USAGE. 

ENG 625 LANGUAGE VARIATION RESEARCH SEXDNAR. 

ENG 626 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

ENG 627 LINGUISTICS AND LITERACY. 

ENG 628 LANGUAGE CHANGE RESEARCH SEMINAR. 

ENG 630 17TH-CENTURY ENGLISH UTERATURE. 



116 



ENG 640 fflSTORY OF UTERARY CRITICISM. 

ENG 641 CONTEMPORARY LITERARY THEORY. 

ENG 648 AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

ENG 649 MODERN AFRICAN LITERATURE. 

ENG 650 ENGLISH ROMANTIC PERIOD. 

ENG 651 CHAUCER. 

ENG 655 AMERICAN ROMANTIC PERIOD. 

ENG 658 STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE. 

ENG 660 VICTORIAN POETRY AND CRITICAL PROSE. 

ENG 662 18TH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

ENG 663 18TH-CENTURY ENGUSH NOVEL. 

ENG 664 VICTORIAN NOVEL. 

ENG 665 AMERICAN REALISM AND NATURAUSM. 

ENG 670 20TH-CENTURY BRITISH PROSE. 

ENG 671 20TH-CENTURY BRITISH POETRY. 

ENG 672 MODERN BRITISH DRAMA. 

ENG 673 MODERN AMERICAN DRAMA. 

ENG 674 CO\n»ARATrVE DRAMA. 

ENG 675 20TH-CENTURY AMERICAN PROSE. 

ENG 676 20TH-CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY. 

ENG 678 LITERARY POSTMODERNISM. 

ENG 682 STUDIES IN LITERATURE. 

ENG 683 STUDIES IN COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC. 

ENG 684 STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS. 

ENG 685 STUDIES IN FILM. 

ENG 686 STUDIES IN THEORY. 

ENG 688 STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING. 

ENG 690 DIRECTED READINGS. 

ENG 696 PROBLEMS IN COLLEGE COMPOSITION. 

ENG 697 TEACHING METHODS FOR PROFESSIONAL WRITING. 

ENG 698 BIBLIOGRAPHY AND METHODOLOGY. 

ENG 699 THESIS RESEARCH. 



English Education 



For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see curriculum and 
instruction. 

Entomology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Agriculture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. D. Harper, Head of the Department 
Professor W. M. Brooks, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7613, (919) 515-3771, wbrooks@entl.ncsu.edu 

Blanton J. Whitmire Professor: C. Schal 
Philip Morris Professor: J. W. Van Duyn 



117 



William Need Reynolds Professors: F. L. Gould, G. G. Kennedy 

Professors: J. T. Ambrose, C. S. Apperson, R. C. Axtell, J. S. Bacheler, J. R. 
Baker, J. R. Bradley Jr., R. L. Brandenburg, L. L. Deitz, F. P. Hain, R. J. Kuhr, 
J. R. Meyer, B. M. Parker, R. M. Roe, K. A. Sorensen, P. S. Southern, R. E. 
Stinner; Visiting Professor: F. L. Hastings; Adjunct Professors: J. J. Arends, C. Y. 
Kawanishi, P. M. Marsh; Professors Emeriti: W. V. Campbell, M. H. Farrier, K. L. 
Knight, W. J. Mistric Jr., H. B. Moore, Jr., H. H. Neunzig, R. L. Rabb, R. L. 
Robertson, C. F. Smith, C. G. Wright; Associate Professor: J. F. Walgenbach; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: C. A. Nalepa; Associate Professor Emeritus: R. C. 
Hillmann; Assistant Professors: M. E. Barbercheck, D. B. Orr, B. M. Wiegmann; 
Visiting Assistant Professors: D, W. Keever, M. G. Waldvogel; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: D. A. Herbert Jr., R. C. McDonald, M. D. Tomalski 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Professor: H. M. Linker 

Course offerings or research facilities are available in the following areas: agricultural 
«itomology, apiculture, behavior, biological control, ecology, forest entomology, host- 
plant resistance, invertebrate pathology, medical and veterinary entomology, pest 
managem^it, physiology and molecular biology, population dynamics, soil entomology, 
urban entomology, systems analysis systematics and toxicology. 

Admission Requirements: A minimum score of 1000 (verbal plus quantitative) is neces- 
sary for admission to the M.A. or M.S. program while a score of 1 100 is required for 
the Ph.D. program. Students are expected to have a background in biology in addition 
to appropriate courses in chemistry, biochemistry, mathematics, and physics. A "B" 
average (3.0 GPA) is required in biology courses and an overall 3.0 GPA during the last 
2 years of the undergraduate program. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate assistantships and other forms of aid are available 
to students as described in the Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships section of the 
Graduate Catalog. 

Other Relevant Information: Admission is permitted only after acceptable applicants 
have secured an advisor and appropriate financial support. All students are expected to 
begin their research as soon as p>ossible upon arrival in the department. 

nRAnriATF rnriR^F^ 

ENT502 INSECT SYSTEMATICS. 

ENT 503 INSECT MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 
ENT(ZO) 509 ECOLOGY OF STREAM INVERTEBRATES. 
ENT 520 INSECT PATHOLOGY. 

118 



ENT531 INSECT ECOLOGY. 

ENT541 IMMATURE INSECTS. 

ENT 550 FUNDAMENTALS OF INSECT CONTROL. 

ENT 562 INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT IN AGRICULTURAL CROPS. 

ENT(FOR) 565 ADVANCED FOREST ENTOMOLOGY. 

ENT(2X)) 582 MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY. 

ENT 590 SPECIAL PROBLEMS. 

ENT 591 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENTOMOLOGY. 

ENT 592 AGRICULTURAL ENTOMOLOGY PRACTICUM. 

ENT(TOX)622 INSECT TOXICOLOGY. 

ENT 690 SEMINAR. 

ENT 699 RESEARCH. 

Fiber and Polymer Science 

Degree Offered: Ph.D. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor CD. Livengood, Program Director 

Box 8301, (919) 515-3057, charles_livengood@ncsu.edu 

Professors: R. L. Baricer, S. K. Batra, K. R. Beck, D, R. Buchanan, C. L. Bumgard- 
ner, A. H. M. El-Shiekh, H. S. Freeman, R. E. Fomes, P, L. Grady, B. S. Gupta, 
H. B. Hopfenberg, T. J. Little, R. McGregor, G. N. Mock, M. H. M. Mohamed, H. 
G. Olf, S. T. Purrington, C. B. Smith, E. O. Stejskal, M. W. Suh, M. H. Theil, C. 
Tomasino, A. E. Tonelli, P. A. Tucker Jr., S. C. Winchester Jr., C. F. Zorowski; 
Professors Emeriti: J. F. Bogdan, D. M. Gates, D. W. Chaney, J. A. Cuculo, R. D. 
Gilbert, D. S. Hamby, S. P. Hersh, L. A. Jones, P. R. Lord, H. A. Rutherford, V. T. 
Stannett, W. C. Stuckey Jr., W. K. Walsh, W. M. Whaley; Associate Professors: C. 
M. Balik, P. Banks-Lee, T. G. Clapp, T. K. Ghosh, T. F. Gilmore, H. Hamouda, 
S. M. Hudson, S. A. Khan, W. Oxaiham, J. W. Rucker, J. P. Rust, A. M. Seyam; 
Associate Professors Emeriti: T. H. Guion, T. G. Rochow; Assistant Professors: C. 
B. Gorman, H. H. A. Hergeth, W. J. Jasper, M. G. McCord, M. Srinivasarao, R. 
A. Venditti; Adjunct Assistant Professors: A. C. Bullerwell 

Fiber and polymer science is a multidisciplinary program bringing together the dis- 
ciplines of mathematics, chemistry and physics and the appUcation of engineering 
principles for the development of independent scholars versed in all aspects of fiber 
materials science. Thus, fiber and polymer science is concerned with the formation of 
and the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of polymeric materials, fibers 
produced from them, fiber assembUes in one-, two- and three-dimensional forms, and 
fiber reinforced composites, as well as the utilization thereof. 

Admission Requirements: Students majoring in the physical sciences, engineering, 
mathanatics, textiles and having a master's degree will normally qualify for admission. 

119 



For exceptionally qualified students, the master's degree requirement may be waived, 
and the student can be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: There are no fixed credit-hour requirements for the 
Doctor of RiilosopJiy degree. Students are admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree 
after passing a series of written cumulative examinations, completing a scholarly critique 
of existing knowledge in the field of specialization, and orally defending a research 
proposal. A written examination in a minor field may be accepted in place of the 
scholarly critique. They must also have passed an English technical writing course 
during their college career. 

Student Financial Support: Financial aid in the form of assistantships and fellowships 
is normally available for all full-time students. 

Other Relevant Iriformation: In 1991, the College of Textiles moved to its new 298,000 
square foot complex, now valued at over $50 million, which houses exceptional 
teaching, research, computer, and hbrary facilities. With a graduate faculty of 45 and 
over $7,000,000 spent on research in 1993, opportunities abound ranging from 
preserving the local environment (research sponsored by EPA) to exploring outer space 
(Mars Mission Research Center sponsored by NASA). 

rnriR^F OFFFRINGS (Extensive use may be made of graduate course offerings in 
other colleges on campus when developing the minor field.) 

nFPJFRAT rnriRSFS 

TC 504 FIBER FORMATION-THEORY AND PRACTICE. 

TC(CH,MAT) 562 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS-BULK PROPERTIES. 

TES 500 FIBER AND POLYMER MICROSCOPY. 

TES 505 TEXTILE INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS. 

TES 561 MECHANICAL AND RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FIBROUS MATERIAL. 

TES(MAT) 563 CHARACTERIZATION OF STRUCTURE OF FIBER FORAflNG POLYMERS. 

TC 591 SPECIAL TOPICS IN TEXTILE SCIENCE. 

TES(TC) 691 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FIBER SCIENCE. 

rnriRSFS i^ arfas of spfciat jzation 

Polymer Chemistry and Synthesis 

TC 520 CHEMISTRY OF DYES ANT) COLOR. 

TC 521 DYE SYNTHESIS LABORATORY. 

TC525 DYEING CELLULOSE. 

TC 530 THE CHEMISTRY OF TEXTILE AUXIUARIES. 

TC 561 ORGANIC CHE\OSTRY OF POLYMERS. 

TC(CHE) 671 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLYMER SCIENCE. 

Polymer Physics and Physical Chemistry 
TES 500 FIBER AND POLYMER MICROSCOPY. 



120 



TC 504 FIBER FORMATION-THEORY AND PRACTICE. 

TC 505 THEORY OF DYEING. 

TC(CH,MAT) 562 PHYSICAL CHE\nSTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS-BULK PROPERTIES. 

TC(CH,MAT) 662 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS-SOLUTION PROPER- 
TIES. 
TC(CHE) 569 POLYMERS, SURFACTANTS AND COLLOIDAL MATERIALS. 
TC(CIIE) 669 DIFFUSION IN POLYMERS. 

TES 562 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF FIBER FOR^^NG POLYMERS, FIBERS AND 
FIBROUS STRUCTURES. 
TES(TC) 691 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FIBER SCIENCE. 

Mechanics of Textile Materials and Processes 

TAM 610 YARN PRODUCTION PROPERTIES. 

TES(TAM) 520 YARN PROCESSING DYNANDCS. 

TES 549 WARP KNIT ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DESIGN. 

TES(TAM) 555 PRODUCTION MECHANICS AND PROPERTIES OF WOVEN FABRICS. 

TES 565 TEXTILE COMPOSITES. 

TES(TAM) 640 PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF KNITTED FABRICS. 

TESfTAM) 651, 652 FABRIC DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION. 

TES(TAM) 663 MECHANICS OF TWISTED STRUCTURES. 

TES(TAM) 664 MECHANICS OF FABRIC STRUCTURES. 

Food Science 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

William Neal Reynolds Professor K. R. Swartzel, Head of the Department 
Professor D. K. Larick, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7624, (919) 515-2971, duane_larick@ncsu.edu 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: T. 

R. Klaenhammer 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: H. E. Swaisgood 

Professors: D. E. Carroll, Jr., G. L. Catignani, E. A. Foegeding, P. M. Foegeding, 

D. D. Hamann, A. P. Hansen, T. C. Lanier, J. L. Oblinger, D. H. Pilkington, J. 

E. Rushing, B. W. Sheldon, L. G. Turner, D. R. Ward, C. T. Young; Professors 
(USDA): H. P. Fleming, R. F. McFeeters, T. H. Sanders, W. M. Walter Jr.; Adjunct 
Professor. J. P. Adams; Professors Emeriti: L. W. Aurand, H. R. Ball, Jr., T. A. Bell, 
T. N. Blumer, R. E. Carawan, E. S. Cofer, M. E. Gregory, M. W. Hoover, I. D. 
Jones, V. A. Jones, W. M. Roberts, S. J. Schwartz, M. L. Speck, F. R. Tarver, Jr., 

F. B. Thomas, F. G. Warrai; Associate Professors: J. C. Allen, L. C. Boyd, P. A. 
Curtis; Assistant Professors: B. E. Farkas, D. P. Green, L.-A. Jaykus 



121 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: H. M. Hassan, F. T. Jones, C. J. Lackey; Professor (USDA): H. E. Pattee; 
Associate Professor: T. J. Hoban; Assistant Professor: S. A. Hale 

The department's professional activities include teaching, research, and extension 
functions. The program provides an educational, research, and informational center in 
food science for North Carolina and the nation. The department also houses three 
research c«iters, the Southeastern Dairy Foods Research Center, the Center for Aseptic 
Processing and Packaging Studies and the Michael Foods Single Sponsored Laboratory. 
Course offerings atKl research facihties are available in the following areas: chemistry- 
biochemistry, engineering, microbiology, nutrition and processing technology. 

Admissions Requirements: To be admitted, a student should be a graduate of an 
accredited program in food science or the equivalent. Graduates of other majors can be 
admitted but will be required to make up certain imdergraduate deficiencies without 
graduate credit. The best qualified apphcants will be accepted up to the number of 
spaces that are available or new students. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A master's program must include courses from at least 

2 of the following categories: chemistry -biochemistry, engineering, microbiology, 
nutrition and processing technology. No fewer than 6 credits must be at the 600 level. 
A minor is required. Credits for the minor are variable depending upon the requirements 
of the minor department or program. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: A doctoral program must include courses from at least 

3 of the categories hsted above (or equivalent courses at another university). Courses 
must be selected from groups embracing one principal subject of concentration, the 
major, and from a cognate field, the minor. Total credits and credits for the minor are 
not specified and will vary depending on the needs of the student. All doctoral students 
are required to pass a departmental administered written preliminary exam, designed to 
evaluate a Ph.D. student's general knowledge and comprehension of food science. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate assistantships and other forms of student aid 
available to students in this program are described elsewhere in the Graduate Catalog. 

Other Relevant Information: Students are encouraged to make personal contact with 
individual faculty whose research program is of interest to them. The department 
provides a Graduate Studies in Food Science brochure describing each faculty member's 
program for this purpose. 



122 



nRAniJATE rniJR^FS 

FS 504 FOOD PROTEINS AND ENZYMES. 

FS509 FOOD LIPIDS. 

FS522 MICROBIAL FOOD SAFETY. 

FS(MB) 525 FERMENTATION MICROBIOLOGY. 

FS(NTR) 530 HUMAN NUTRITION. 

FS 551 FOOD INGREDIENT TECHNOLOGY IN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT. 

FS 552 PRINCIPLES OF SENSORY EVALUATION. 

FS{BAE)585 FOOD RHEOLOGY. 

FS 591 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FOOD SCIENCE. 

FS 605 PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF MUSCLE FOODS. 

FS(NTR)606 VITAMIN METABOLISM. 

FS680 SEMINAR IN FOOD SCIENCE. 

FS 691 SPECIAL RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN FOOD SCIENCE. 

FS699 RESEARCH IN FOOD SCIENCE. 

Forestry 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Forestry, Master of Wildlife Biology, 
Master of Natural Resources Administration 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor F. W. Cubbage, Head of the Department 
Professor D. L. Holley Jr., Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8002, (919) 515-7560, hoUey@cfr.cfr.ncsu.edu 

Distinguished University Professor: E. B. Cowling 

William Neal Reynolds Professor and Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor: S. 

W. Buol 

Edwin F. Conger Professor: R. R. Sederoff 

Professors'. H. L. Allen, Jr., R. I. Bruck, A. W. Cooper, H. A. Devine, P. D. 
Doerr, E. C. Franklin, D. J. Frederick, L. F. Grand, F. P. Hain, A. E. Hassan, 
J. B. Jett, Jr., S. Khorram, J. G. Laarman, R. A. Lancia, R. Lea, J. R. McGraw, 
S. E. McKeand, R. L. Noble, J. D. Wellman, A. G. WoUum H; Professors (USDA): 
F. E. Bridgwater Jr., D. E. Moreland; Research Professor: W. S. Dvorak; Adjunct 
Professors: G. L. DeBarr, G. F. Dutrow, P. Famum, J. D. Hair, J. R. Jorgensen, S. 
Linder, R. W. Stonecypher; Professors Emeriti: D. A. Adams, C. B. Davey, J. W. 
Duffield, W. L. Hafley, W. T. Huxster Jr., R. C. Kellison, W. D. MiUer, L. A. 
Nelson, T. O. Perry, R. J. Preston, P. A. Sanchez, L. C. Saylor, B. J. Zobel; Associate 
Professors: R. C. Abt, H. V. Amerson, R. R. Braham, J. D. Gregory, G. R. Hodge, 
E. J. Jones, C. R. McKinley, J. P. Roise, A. M. Stomp, R. J. Weir; Associate 
Professors (USDA): M. A. Buford, J. E. deSteiguer, P. M. Dougherty; Visiting 
Associate Professor. G. R. Hodge; Adjunct Associate Professors: D. L. Bramlett, R. 



123 



G. Campbell, C. C. Lambeth, D. L. Loftis, J, N. Woodman; Assistant Professors: 
G. B. Blank, B. Goklfaib; Research Assistant Professors: B.-H. Liu, D. M. O'Malley, 
R. W. Whetten; Assistant Professor (USD A): W. D. Smith; Assistant Professor 
(USDI): J. A. Collazo; Visiting Assistant Professors: B. A. Bergmann, M. M. 
Campbell, B. Li, S. C. McKelvey, T. H. Shear; Adjunct Assistant Professors: M, C. 
Conner, L. J. Frampton Jr., T. P. Hohnes, W. E. Ladrach, R. B. McCullough, D. E. 
Mercer, R. C. Pumell, K. R. Roeder, M. M. Schoeneberger, D. N. Wear 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: P. T. Bromley, L. E. Hinesley, E. A. Wheeler; Associate Professors: R. 
A. Powell, B. E. Wilson; Assistant Professor (USDI): T. R. Simons 

The department offers training in all of the major sub-disciplines of forest-related 
science and management. Considerable flexibihty is allowed in developing graduate 
programs tailored to the student's objectives. 

Admission Requirements: All parts of the appUcation, including the GRE general test, 
are considered in making decisions. Admission is competitive and depends on the will- 
ingness of at least one member of the faculty to serve as major professor. An under- 
graduate degree in forestry is not required. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Course work requirements range from 30 to 36 credits 
dep^xling on the specific master's option. Students without an appropriate background 
will require additional preparatory work. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: 

As a rule, students must complete a master's degree before entering the Ph.D. program. 
However, exceptionally well-prepared students may petition to have their degree objec- 
tive changed to Hi.D .before completing the master's degree. In addition to the disserta- 
tion, Ph.D. programs typically require 30 credits of course work beyond the master's 
degree. 

Student Financial Support: Merit-based research assistantships are available every year 
in most fields of specialization. Stipend levels allow students to graduate without incur- 
ring significant debt. Those who begin without an assistantship are considered for 
funding as projects become available. 

Other Relevant Ir^formation: Every graduate student must meet the following three 
requir^nents: (1) register for a 1-credit research methodology course, FOR 689, in the 
first semester, (2) meet a one-time teaching requirement by assisting a faculty member 
teach an undergraduate forestry course and (3) begin the final oral exam with a seminar 
to the department based on work accomphshed during the graduate program. 



124 



GRA niJA TF rniiR^FS 

FOR 510 QUANTITATIVE FOREST GENETICS METHODS. 

FOR 511 TREE IMPROVEMENT RESEARCH TECHNIQUES. 

FOR 512 FOREST ECONONflCS. 

FOR 534 ADVANCED FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING. 

FOR 540 ADVANCED DENDROLOGY. 

FOR 553 ENVIRONMENTAL REMOTE SENSING. 

FOR(ENT) 565 ADVANCED FOREST ENTOMOLOGY. 

FOR 572A,B FOREST MANAGEMENT POLICIES ON THE PUBLIC LANDS. 

FOR 574 TOPICS IN FOREST MODELING. 

FOR(SSC) 577 CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT I: CONCEPTS AND 
METHODS. 

FOR(SSC) 578 CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT II: INTEGRATED 
PROBLEM SOLVING. 

FOR(SSC)581 AGROFORESTRY. 

FOR 582 SILVICULTURE AND MANAGEMENT OF FOREST PLANTATIONS IN THE TROP- 
ICS. 

FOR 583 TROPICAL FORESTRY. 

FOR 584 THE PRACTICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT. 

FOR(FW) 585 ADVANCED WILDLIFE HABITAT MANAGEMENT. 

FOR 592 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FORESTRY. 

FOR(FW) 594 SENflNAR IN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. 

FOR 601 ADVANCED HYDROLOGY. 

FOR(GN) 611 FOREST GENETICS. 

FOR(GN) 612 ADVANCED TOPICS IN QUANTITATIVE GENETICS. 

FOR 613 ADVANCED TOPICS IN SILVICULTURE. 

FOR 672 CURRENT ISSUES IN NATURAL RESOURCE POUCY. 

FOR 673 ECOPHYSIOLOGY OF FOREST PRODUCTION. 

FOR 689 SEMINAR IN FOREST RESEARCH. 

FOR 691 GRADUATE SEMINAR. 

FOR 692 ADVANCED TOPICS IN FORESTRY. 

FOR 699 RESEARCH IN FORESTRY. 

Genetics 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. E. Curtis, Head of the Department 

William Neal Reynolds Professor W. R. Atchley, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7614, (919) 515-2291, atchley@ncsu.edu 

Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: C. S. 

Levings HI 

Distinguished University Professor: J. G. Scandalios 

Professors: W. E. Kloos, T. F. Mackay, W. H. McKenzie, H. E. Schaffer, S. L. 
Spiker; Professor (USDA): C. W. Stuber; Adjunct Professor: M.-D. Chilton; 



125 



Professors Emeriti: J. L. Apple, C. H. Bostian, C. C. Cockerham, W. D. Hanson, T. 
J. Mann, D. F. Matzinger, L. E. Mettler, R. H. Moll, A. C. Triantaphyllo; Associate 
Professors: M. T. Andrews, M. A. Conkling, T. H. Emigh, J. W. Mahaffey; 
Assistant Professors: M. D. Purugganan, J. C. Swaffield 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: E. J. Eisen, M. M. Goodman, B. T. McDaniel, R. M. Fetters, O. W. 
Robison, R. R. Sederoff, W. F. Thompson, B. S. Weir, E. A. Wemsman; Professors 
Emeriti: J. L. Apple, J. F. Chaplin, F. L. Haynes Jr., C. L. Markert, L. L. PhiUips, 
J. O. Rawlings; Associate Professors: R. S. Boston, L. K. Hanley-Bowdoin, C. H. 
Opperman; Research Associate Professor: S. Zeng 

The department provides a well-balanced program of graduate course work and re- 
search training. The faculty conducts research in genetics of animals, plants, and 
bacteria. The student has a choice of research projects in the broad areas of molecular, 
biochemical, developmental, quantitative and population genetics. 

Admission Requirements: AppUcants may come from a number of undergraduate pro- 
grams that include biological, agricultural, physical and mathematical science training. 
All appUcations are screened by a departmental committee and the best qualified appU- 
cants will be accepted up to the number of spaces that are available for new students. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A 6-hour sequence of 6 minicourses is required of all 
majors and minors. A minimum of 2 additional graduate genetics courses are required. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: A 6-hour sequence of 6 minicourses is required of all 
majors and minors. A minimum of 4 additional graduate genetics courses are required. 
A minor may be interdisciplinary or in a specific department. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate assistantships and fellowships are available to the 
students from a number of sources. Information will be provided at the time of apphca- 
tion. 

Other Relevant Information: New students will rotate through 3 laboratories during 
their first sanester. At the end of the semester, they will choose a laboratory for their 
research activities consistent with their interests and available research projects. 
Provisions are available for a co-major and cooperative research in more than one 
laboratory. 



126 



nRADUATF rnuR^FS 

GN 501 GENETICS I: MOLECULAR GENETICS. 

GN 502 GENETICS I: BIOCHEMICAL GENETICS. 

GN 503 GENETICS I: DEVELOPMENTAL GENETICS. 

GN504 HUMAN GENETICS. 

GN(ANS) 508 GENETICS OF ANIMAL IMPROVEMENT. 

GN 509 GENETICS II: POPULATION GENETICS. 

GN 510 GENETICS II: QUANTITATIVE GENETICS. 

GN 511 GENETICS II: CYTOGENETICS. 

GN(ZO) 540 EVOLUTION. 

GN(CS,HS) 541 PLANT BREEDING METHODS. 

GN(CS,HS) 542 PLANT BREEDING LABORATORY. 

GN(CS,HS) 543 PLANT BREEDING LABORATORY. 

GN555 POPULATION GENETICS. 

GN(MB) 558 PROKARYOTIC MOLECULAR GENETICS. 

GN560 MOLECULAR GENETICS. 

GN(ST) 565 GENETIC DATA ANALYSIS. 

GN(ANS) 603 QUANTITATIVE GENETICS AND BREEDING. 

GN(FOR)611 FOREST GENETICS. 

GN(FOR) 612 ADVANCED TOPICS IN QUANTITATIVE GENETICS. 

GN(CS,HS) 615 QUANTITATIVE GENETICS IN PLANT BREEDING. 

GN(CS,HS) 616 BREEDING METHODS. 

GN(CS,HS,PP) 618 BREEDING FOR PEST RESISTANCE. 

GN(CS) 619 ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF CULTIVATED PLANTS. 

GN(CS,HS) 620 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY IN PLANT BREEDING. 

GN(ST) 626 STATISTICAL CONCEPTS IN GENETICS. 

GN(BO,MB,PP) 627 FUNGAL GENETICS AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

GN641 COLLOQUIUM IN GENETICS. 

GN650 DEVELOPMENTAL GENETICS. 

GN(BCH) 658 NUCLEIC ACIDS: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION. 

GN(MB) 660 EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIAL GENETICS. 

GN(BCH) 661 ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL. 

GN691 SEMINAR. 

GN 693 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GENETICS. 

GN 695 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN GENETICS. 

GN699 RESEARCH. 

Graphic Design 

Degree O^ered: Master of Graphic Design 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor M. Davis, Head of the Department 

Box 7701, (919) 515-2202, meredith_davis@ncsu.edu 

Professors: A. S. Lowrey, M. Scotford; Associate Professor: A. K. Blauvelt; Assistant 
Professors: K. L. Bailey, J. Spadaro, S. Townsend 



127 



Recognizing that graphic design is both a social activity and a fonn of cultural 
production, faculty and students in the Department of Graphic Design define the study 
of the discipline as necessarily contextual; graduate research examines the creation, 
reproduction, distribution, and reception of design from a multidisciplinary perspective. 
The Master of Graphic Design Program also emphasizes the importance of under- 
staiKling design as the creation of cognitive and cultural artifacts; study focuses on the 
construction of messages, the reproduction of such artifacts, the systems for their 
distribution, and their reception within various cultures of society. 

Graduate students in gr^hic design learn through their own search for problems within 
critical content frameworks presented by the faculty. The program places primary 
impoitance on the ability of students to be critical agents; to seek problems and to pose 
questions. Faculty evaluate graduate students on their capacity to define individual 
investigations and to support their decision-making with an independent program of 
reading and research; on their ability to critically evaluate and articulate discoveries; and 
on their skills in synthesizing ideas through the creation of design artifacts. 

The Master of Graphic Design Program provides focused study and research in the 
discipline that reflects concern for how designers will shape and respond to the changing 
technological and social commimications environments of the future. The Program has 
the broad objective to educate socially responsible, intellectually curious, historically 
aware, and technologically adept communication design professionals. 

In the Track HI Program, students whose undergraduate preparation is in fields other 
than graphic design examine relationships between their previous study and graphic 
design. While acquiring design skills and knowledge in graphic design, they apply 
concepts and methods from their previous study to design research and innovation. 

Admissions Requirements: Students must make appUcation to the Department of 
Graphic Design by January 15. hi addition to Graduate School requirements, the 
depaitm^it requires department personal data forms and a shde portfoho of design and 
two-dimensional visual work. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Studio credits presented for transfer must be accom- 
panied by a portfoUo of work from the courses under consideration. 

Student Financial Support: The department has limited provisions for tuition remission 
and assistantships. Assistantships are awarded on the basis of student and departmental 
needs. Assistantship appUcations are available from the Department of Graphic Design 
and should be submitted with the apphcation for admission (for incoming students) or 
by the advertised deadline (for continuing students). 



128 



nRADUATF rnuR^FS 

GD 501 GRADUATE GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO I. 

GD 502 GRADUATE GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO II. 

GD 517 ADVANCED TYPOGRAPHIC SYSTEMS. 

GD 518 ADVANCED TYPOGRAPHIC EXPRESSION. 

GD 570 THEORY IN PRACTICE: GRAPIUC DESIGN SINCE 1945. 

GD 571 GRAPHIC DESIGN AS COGNITIVE ARTIFACT. 

GD 572 GRAPHIC DESIGN AS CULTURAL ARTIFACT. 

GD 580 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GRAPHIC DESIGN HISTORY. 

GD 591 SPECIAL PROJECT IN GRAPHIC DESIGN. 

GD 592 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GRAPHIC DESIGN. 

GD 595 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GRAPHIC DESIGN. 

GD 600 ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN (SERIES). 

GD 601 GRADUATE GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO III. 

GD 671 GRAPHIC DESIGN AND NEW INFORMATION ENVIRONMENTS. 

GD 681 GRAPHIC DESIGN FINAL PROJECT RESEARCH. 

GD 688 FINAL PROJECT STUDIO IN GRAPHIC DESIGN. 

GD 691 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GRAPHIC DESIGN. 

Health Occupations Teacher Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see adult and community col- 
lege education. 

Higher Education Administration 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see adult and co mmuni ty col- 
lege education. 

History 

Degree Offered: M.A. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. M. Riddle, Head of the Department 
Professor G. W. O'Brien, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 8108, (919) 515-2483, gobrien@unity.ncsu.edu 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor J. D. Smith, Coordinator, Public History 
Program 

Professors: J. R. Banker, B. F. Beers, C. H. Carlton, A. J. De Grand, D. P. Gilmartin, 
W. C. Harris, J. P. Hobbs, A. J. LaVopa, L. O. McMurry, J. K. Ocko, S. T. Parker, 
R. H. Sack, R. W. Slatta, E. D. Sylla, K. S. Vincent; Professors Emeriti: M. L. 
Brown Jr., M. S. Downs, R. W. Greenlaw, D. E. King, M. E. Wheeler, B. W. Wishy; 



129 



Associate Professors: J. E. Crisp, W. A. Jackson IE, O. J. Kalinga, W. C. Kimler, 
K. P. Luria, S. Middleton, J. A. Mulholland, S. L. Spencer, G. D. Surh, P. Tyler, 
K. P. Vickery, D. A. Zonderman; Adjunct Associate Professors: J. J. Crow, D. J. 
Olson; Associate Professor Emeritus: R. N. Elliott; Assistant Professors: H. Brewer, 
A. F. Khater, A. W. Mitchell; Adjunct Assistant Professors: V. L. Berger, J. W. 
Caddell, J. C. Cashion, H. E. Mattox, W. S. Price Jr., G. E. Southern 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professor: A. Lumpkin; Associate Professor: R. B. Mullin; Visiting Assistant 
Professor: J. C. Bonham 

Admission Requirements: In the required career goals statement, the major country, 
topic and historical period of interest should be included. Students admitted provisional- 
ly must complete at least 9 hours of graduate courses making grades of A or B to be 
considered for full graduate standing. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Master of Arts Degree in History: This program 
requires at least twaity-four hours of course work and a thesis. Each student's program 
is tailored to aihance his or her career objectives. Social studies teachers, for example, 
are awarded a G certificate on completion of the M.A. in history with a minor in 
education. Similarly, students who plan to pursue a Ph.D. degree receive the requisite 
training and assistance. Master of Arts Degree in Public History: This non-thesis 
program requires thirty-six hours of course work. Half the hours fall in historical 
studies, the rest in applied history classes, including innovative courses in iconographic 
materials and archival conservation, documentary editing, and historic preservation. 
Students may select a practicum that places them under the direct supervision of the 
State Archivist of North Carolina. Students may select another practicum in their own 
special area of interest—including historic site administration, museology, historic 
preservation, or historical pubhcations. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate assistantships and fellowships are available to 
students in both programs and are awarded by open competition. 

Other Relevant Information: AppUcation deadline is January 15; students are admitted 
for the fall semester only. The general portion of the GRE is required for those seeking 
admission to both the history and public history programs. No subject test is required 
for either program. 

GRAnnATR rniJRSES 

HI 500 CIVILIZATIONS OF THE ANCmr^ NEAR EAST. 

HI 504 ROME TO 337 A. D. 

HI 505 HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE. 

HI 506 FROM ROMAN EMPIRE TO MIDDLE AGES. 

130 



fflSO? ISLAMIC fflSTORY TO 1798. 

10 509 THE IDGH MIDDLE AGES. 

fflSlO ITALIAN RENAISSANCE. 

HI 511 THE PROTESTANT AlVD CATHOLIC REFORMATION OF THE 16TII CENTURY. 

HI 514 FRANCE IN THE OLD REGIME. 

HI 515 REVOLUTIONARY EUROPE. 

HI 517 EUROPE IN CRISIS: 1890-1917. 

HI 518 FASCISM-REVOLUTION-REACTION: EUROPE 1919-1939. 

HI 519 MODERN EUROPEAN IMPERIALISM. 

HI 520 EUROPEAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY. 

HI 521 EUROPEAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY: THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

HI 522 EUROPEAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY: THE 19TH CENTURY. 

HI 525 TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND. 

HI 529 20TH CENTURY BRITAIN. 

HI 530 MODERN FRANCE. 

HI 531 GERMANY: LUTHER TO BISMARCK 1500-1871. 

HI 532 HISTORY OF GERMANY SINCE 1871. 

HI 538 THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE TO 1917. 

HI 539 HISTORY OF THE SOVIET UNION AND AFTER. 

HI 541 COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY U. S. 

HI 543 U. S. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY. 

HI 546 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION. 

HI 548 AMERICAN WOMEN IN THE TWE>mETH CENTURY. 

HI 549 U. S. LABOR TO 1900. 

HI 550 U. S. LABOR SINCE 1900. 

HI 552 RECENT AMERICA. 

HI 553 U. S.-LATIN AMERICAN RELATIONS SINCE 1823. 

HI 554 HISTORY OF U. S. FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1900-PRESENT. 

HI 555 HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT. 

HI 556 EARLY AMERICAN THOUGH. 

HI 557 TWENTIETH-CENTURY U. S. INTELLECTUAL HISTORY. 

HI 558 MODERN AMERICAN HISTORICAL BIOGRAPHY. 

HI 561 CIVILIZATION OF THE OLD SOUTH. 

HI 562 SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE NEW SOUTH. 

HI 564 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA. 

HI 569 LATIN AMERICAN REVOLUTIONS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. 

HI 571 REVOLUTIONARY CHINA. 

HI 576 LEADERSHIP IN MODERN AFRICA. 

HI 580 SCEENTIFIC REVOLUTION: 1300-1700. 

HI 581 HISTORY OF LIFE SCIENCES. 

HI 582 DARWINISM IN SCIENCE AND SOCIETY. 

m 585 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY. 

HI 586 HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF ARCHIVES AND 

MANUSCRIPTS. 
HI 587 APPUCATION OF PRINCIPLES OF ADMINISTRATION OF ARCHIVES AND 

MANUSCRIPTS. 
HI 588 RECORDS MANAGEMENT. 
HI 589 AUTOMATION AND PUBLIC HISTORY. 
HI 601 HISTORIOGRAPHY AND HISTORICAL METHOD. 
HI 602 HISTORICAL WRITING. 
HI 684 INTRODUCTION TO MUSEOLOGY. 
HI 685 INDEPENDENT STUDY. 
HI 686 ADVANCED MUSEOLOGY. 

HI 688 CONSERVATION OF ARCHIVAL AND LIBRARY MATERIALS. 
HI 689 DOCUMENTARY EDITING. 
HI 691 PRACTICUM IN PUBLIC HISTORY. 
HI 699 RESEARCH IN HISTORY. 

131 



Horticultural Science 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Agriculture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T.J. Monaco, Head of the Department 
Professor D. J. Werner, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7609, (919) 515-1226, denms_weraer@iicsu.edu 

Professors: J. R. Ballington, Jr., T. E. Bilderback, S. M. Blankenship, F. A. 
Blazich, W. W. Collins, A. A. De Hertogh, P. R. Fantz, W. C. Fonteno, E, R. G. 
Gardner, L. E. Hinesley, W. E. Hooker, R. A. Larson, P. V. Nelson, M. M. Peet, 
K. B. Perry, D. M. Pharr, E, B. Poling, M. A. Powell, Jr., J. C. Raulston, D. C. 
Sanders, C. R. Unrath, S. L. Warren, T. C. Wehner, L. G. Wilson; Adjunct 
Professor: D. T. Patterson; Professors Emeriti: W. E. Ballinger, F. D. Cochran, F. 
L. Haynes Jr., W. R. Hendrson, J. M. Jenkins, T. R. Konsler, J. W. Love, C. H. 
Miller, D. T. Pope; Associate Professors: D. A. Bailey, J. D. Burton, S. D. Clouse, 
J. M. Davis, D. W. Monks, M. L. Parker, T. G. Ranney, J. R. Schultheis; Adjunct 
Associate Professor: P. S. Zomer; Associate Professors Emeriti: T. F. Cannon, D. C. 
Zeiger; Assistant Professor: N. G. Creamer, A. R. Okigbo; Adjunct Assistant 
Professor: F. C. Wise; Lecturer: M. E. Traer 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Professor: D. E. Carroll Jr. 

Course offerings or research facilities are available in the following areas: plant 
j^ysiology, breeding and genetics, herbicide physiology, nutrition, propagation, tissue 
culture, biotechnology, growth regulators, postharvest physiology, control of environ- 
ment, agricultural meteorology, Christmas tree research, landscape horticulture and 
biochemistry of varietal differences. 

Admission Requirements: At the discretion of a graduate program, a student may be 
admitted provisionally for graduate study in a program without the GRE scores. To be 
admitted, a student should have completed course work in physics, mathematics, 
chemistry, soils, plant pathology, genetics, entomology and several courses in 
horticulture. An appUcant deficient in course work may be admitted on a provisional 
basis until the deficiency is made up. 

Master's Degree Requirements: For the Master of Science degree, the program must 
include 4 credit hours of the horticultural science core courses, seminar preparation, and 
presentation of one seminar, and teaching and outreach experiences. 



132 



Doctoral Degree Requirements: The program must include three credit hours of the 
horticultural science core courses, seminar preparation, presentation of two seminars, 
and teaching and outreach experiences. The preliminary comprehensive examination 
consists of written and oral examinations. The Ph.D. requires research and a thesis 
which is defended orally during the final examination. 

Student Financial Support: The department has a number of graduate teaching and 
research assistantships available for promising students; these include Agricultural 
Fouixlation and Experim^it Station assistantships. Those interested should apply at least 
9 months prior to their anticipated enrollment date. 

nn API J ATE COURSES 

HS(PP,CS) 502 PLANT DISEASE: METHODS AND DIAGNOSIS. 

HS(CS) 515 WEED SCIENCE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES. 

HS(CS) 516 WEED BIOLOGY. 

HS(CS) 517 WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 

HS(CS) 518 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS. 

HS 531 PHYSIOLOGY OF LANDSCAPE PLANTS. 

HS 532 VEGETABLE CROP PHYSIOLOGY. 

HS 534 VEGETABLE CROPS PRACTICUM. 

HS(CS,GN) 541 PLANT BREEDING METHODS. 

HS(CS,GN) 542 PLANT BREEDING LABORATORY. 

HS(CS,GN) 543 PLANT BREEDING LABORATORY. 

HS 595 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE. 

HS599 RESEARCH PRINCIPLES. 

HS 601 CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM AND TRANSPORT. 

HS 602 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS PHYSIOLOGY. 

HS 603 BREEDING ASEXUALLY PROPAGATED CROPS. 

HS604 PLANT NOMENCLATURE. 

HS 605 PHYSIOLOGY OF FLOWERING. 

HS 606 FRUIT DEVELOPMENT ANT) POSTHARVEST PHYSIOLOGY. 

HS(CS,GN) 615 QUANTITATIVE GENT:TICS IN PLANT BREEDING. 

HS(CS,GN) 616 BREEDING METHODS. 

HS(CS,GN,PP) 618 BREEDING FOR PEST RESISTANCE. 

HG(CS,GN) 620 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY IN PLANT BREEDING. 

HS622 MINTIRAL NUTRITION IN PLANTS. 

HS(CS,SSC) 625 HERBICIDE CHEMISTRY. 

HS(CS,SSC) 627 HERBICIDE BEHAVIOR IN SOIL AND WATER. 

HS(CS) 629 HERBICIDE BEILWIOR IN PLANTS. 

HS691 SENHNAR. 

HS 695 GRADUATE TOPICS IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE. 

HS699 RESEARCH. 



133 



Immunology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. A. Tompkins, Director 

Box 8401, (919) 515-7394, wayne_tompkins@ncsu.edu 

Professors.V.V. h^ns, E. B. Breitschwerdt, T. T. Brown Jr., P. B. Carter, E. V. 
De Buysscher, F. W. Edais, B. Hammerberg, M. G. Levy, E. J. Noga, L. Ferryman, 
M. A. Qureshi; Professors Emeriti: L. Coggins, J. G. Lecce; Associate Professors: 
G. W. Almond, S. M. Laster, M. B. Tompkins, S. L. Tonkonogy; Research Associate 
Professor. B. A. Weeks-Perkins; Visiting Research Associate Professor: S. Kennedy- 
Stoskopf; Assistant Professors: T. B. Kepler, T. Olivry; Visiting Assistant Professor: 
R. V. English 

Course offerings or research facihties are available in the following areas: immuno- 
gCTietics, immunojjathology, immunotoxicology, immunoparasitology, mucosal immu- 
nology, molecular and infectious disease immunology, molecular genetics, aquatic 
immunology and environmental immunology. 

Admission Requirements: Students will be accepted into the immunology program based 
on their academic records (GPA) as undergraduates and/or as veterinary or medical 
students, results of the GRE, letters of recommendation and expression of interest in 
immunology. For the Ph.D. program, Sf>ecial consideration will be given to students 
who have had research experience (either an M.S. degree or other laboratory experi- 
ence), especially in immunology, microbiology, biochemistry, or genetics or students 
are completing strong clinical residency programs. Completed applications should be 
received by December 15 for fall admission. 

To be admitted, a studoit should be a graduate of a major accredited biological science 
or medical science program. Students lacking appropriate courses may be considered 
for admission but will be required to make up certain imdergraduate deficiencies without 
graduate credit. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Courses must include at least two 500-600-level 
immuno logy courses and one 500-600-level core biochemistry course. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Generally, Ph.D. students should take 22 credit hours 
to satisfy the course requirements of the program. These include at least two 500-600- 
level immunology courses, one 500-600-level biochemistry course and the core course 



134 



in biotechnology (BIT 660). Additional courses in the biotechnology series are 
recommended. The remaining credit hours (8-10) should include journal club (IMM 
691), seminar (IMM 695A) and research credits. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate assistantships are available to students in the im- 
munology program through the affihated departments and graduate training grants. In 
addition, there are graduate research assistantships provided by individual faculty of the 
program. 

Other Relevant Iriformation: The immunology program is an interdepartmental graduate 
program with faculty drawn from the College of Veterinary Medicine and the College 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences' Departments of Biochemistry, Microbiology and 
Poultry Science. For administrative purposes, all students accepted into the program will 
also have to be student members of one of the participating departments. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

IMM(MB)551 IMMUNOLOGY. 

IMM(VMS)555 IMMUNOPARASITOLOGY. 

IMM(MB,PHY,PO,VMS) 556 IMMUNOGE>fETICS. 

IMM(PO)S57 AVIAN IMMUNOLOGY. 

IMM(TOX)60S IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY. 

IMM(MB,VMS) 653 ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY. 

IMMfVMS) 691 ADVANCED TOPICS IN IMMUNOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY. 

IMM(VMS) 695A SEMINAR IN VETERINARY MICROBIOLOGY/ IMMUNOLOGY. 

Industrial Design 

Degree O^ered: Master of Industrial Design 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. E. Lewis, Head of the Department 

Professor H. Khachatoorian, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7701, (919)515-8322 

Professors: V. M. Foote, C. E. Joyner, M. Pause, S. D. Wilchins; Associate Pro- 
fessors: A. V. Cooke, C. D. Cox, L. M. Diaz, D. G. Raymond, S. M. Toplikar; 
Assistant Professors: P. R. Hooper, B. W. Laffitte 

Industrial Design is the professional service of creating and developing concepts and 
specifications that optimize the value, function and appearance of products and product 
systems to the mutual benefit of both user and manufacturer. This service is often 
provided in the context of a cooperative working relationship with other members of a 
development group. 



135 



Typical groups include management, marketing, engineering and manufacturing 
specialists. Industrial designers place special emphasis on human characteristics, needs 
and interests. These require particular understanding of visual, tactile, safety and 
convenience criteria. Industrial designers combine these considerations with practical 
concern for technical processes and requirements for manufacture; marketing 
opportunities and economic constraints; and distribution, sales and servicing arrange- 
ments. Industrial designers are guided by the awareness of their obhgations to protect 
and promote pubUc safety and well being; to respect the environment; and to observe 
ethical business practices. 

Graduates with a Master of Industrial Design have career opportunities in four general 
areas; corporate design offices in manufacturing companies, independent design 
consulting firms, governmental agencies and educational institutions. 

Admissions Requirements: Applicants will be considered for admission on an individual 
basis and plans of study will be developed to take into account previous academic and 
professional experiences. In addition to other forms, appUcations must include a depart- 
mental personal data forms and a portfoUo (required of students with design back- 
grounds). 

Student Financial Support: Priority is given to students in the major science, social 
science and technology areas. 

nRADTIATE rnuRSFS 

ID 511 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MATERIALS AND PROCESSES I. 

ID 512 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MATERIALS AND PROCESSES II. 

ID 541, 542 ADVANCED GRAPfflC DESIGN I, II. 

ID 582 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN. 

ID 591 SPECIAL PROJECT IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN. 

ID 595 INT)EPENDENT STUDY IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN. 

ID 600 ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL DESIGN (SERIES). 

ID 632 ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN PRODUCT ENGINEERING. 

ID 670 ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL DESIGN-TEXTILES (SERIES). 

ID 681 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN PROJECT PREPARATION. 

ID 688 FINAL PROJECT STUDIO IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN. 

ID 691 SPECIAL SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN.. 



136 



Industrial Engineering 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D, M.S., Master of Industrial Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. D. Roberts, Head of the Department 
Professor J. R. Wilson, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7906, (919) 515-6415, jwason@eos.ncsu.edu 

University Professor: S. E. Elmaghraby 

Professors: M. A. Ayoub, R. H. Bernhard, S.-C. Fang, T. J. Hodgson, W. L. Meier 
Jr., H. L. Nuttle, R. G. Pearson, W. A. Smith Jr.; Professors Emeriti: R. Alvarez, C. 
A. Anderson, J. R. Canada, R. W. Llewellyn, A. L. Prak; Associate Professors: C. 
T. Culbreth Jr., Y. Fathi, R. E. King, E. T. Sanii, R. E. Young; Assistant Professors: 
D. R. Cormier, H. Damerdji, M. G. Kay, Y. Lee, G. A. Mirka, C. M. Sommerich, 
J. B. Taylor 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: T. Johnson, R. Luo, W. J. Rasdorf; Associate Professors: S. A. Converse, 
T. L. Honeycutt, R. D. Rodman 

The graduate faculty in industrial engineering supports academic and research interests 
in four areas: manufacturing systems (manufacturing processes, CAM, CIM, robotics, 
automation, and concurrent engineering); production systems (planning, scheduling, 
routing, inventory control, materials handling, facility design, and quahty control); 
syst^ns analysis and optimization (stochastic processes, simulation, and modeling); and 
ergonomics (human performance, occupational safety, and biomechanics). The depart- 
ment faculty actively supports independent graduate degree programs in operations 
research, integrated manufacturing systems engineering and management. 

Admission Requirements: AppUcations are accepted from undergraduate majors in 
engineering and in the behavioral, physical, and mathematical sciences who meet 
prerequisites in calculus and matrix/linear algebra, computer science, and statistics. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The M.S. degree involves depth of study in a specified 
area of concentration, nine hours in a minor and six hours of research credit. The 
Master of Industrial Engineering (M.IE.) degree may be obtained by course work only; 
project work is optional. A minimum of 33 hours is required for the M.IE. 



137 



Doctoral Degree Requirements: This degree requires 60 hours of course work beyond 
the bachelor's degree. Undergraduate students with superior credentials may apply 
directly to the doctoral program and bypass the master's degree. For students who have 
completed the master's degree, typically 30 to 36 hours of additional course work are 
required. A departmental written qualifying examination in two areas is required. 

Student Financial Support'. Research and teaching assistantships are available on a com- 
petitive basis to early applicants. Fellowships of $3,000 and $6,000 which supplement 
assistantship stip^ids, are available to U.S. apphcants with superior credentials. Award 
priority is given to Ph.D., then M.S. apphcants. The department does not make assis- 
tantship or tuition waiver awards to foreign apphcants. 

nRAnjJATK rniiRSES 

IE<MA,OR)505 LINEAR PROGRAMMING. 

IE 506 DESIGN OF FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS. 

IE 507 REAL-TIME CONTROL OF AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING. 

IE(OR)509 DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING. 

IE 510 APPLIED ENGINEERING ECONOMY. 

IE 511 CAPITAL INVESTMENT ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. 

IE 512 BAYESIAN DECISION ANALYSIS FOR ENGINEERS AND MANAGERS. 

IE 516 COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING. 

IE 519 CIM SYSTEM DESIGN. 

IE(MAE) 520 INDUSTRIAL ROBOTICS. 

IE 523 PRODUCTION PLANNING, SCHEDULING AND INVENTORY CONTROL. 

IE 525 ORGANIZATIONAL PLANNING AND CONTROL. 

IE(PSY) 540 HUMAN FACTORS IN SYSTEMS DESIGN. 

IE 541 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY ENGINEERING. 

IE 543 MUSCULOSKELETAL MECHANICS. 

IE 544 OCCUPATIONAL BIOMECHANICS. 

IE<PSY)545 HUMAN PERFORMANCE. 

IE(CSC) 546 MANAGEMENT DECISION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS. 

IE 548 QUALITY ENGINEERING. 

IE 550 CONCURRENT ENGINEERING. 

IE 553 MATERIAL HANT)LING SYSTEMS. 

IE 554 FACILITY LAYOUT AND LOCATION. 

IE 555 THE JUST-IN-TIME PRODUCTION SYSTEM. 

IE 560 APPLIED STOCHASTIC MODELS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 

IE(OR) 561 QUEUES AND STOCHASTIC SERVICE SYSTEMS. 

IE(CSC,OR) 562 COMPUTER SIMULATION TECHNIQUES. 

IE(CSC) 575 VOICE INPUT/OUTPUT COMMUNICATION SYS-TEMS. 

IE(MA,OR)586 NETWORK FLOWS. 

IE 588 DIRECTED STUDY IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 

IE 589 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 

BE 591 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS. 

IE(PSY) 593 AREA SEMINAR IN ERGONOMICS. 

IE 594 SE\nNAR IN PRODUCT SAFETY AND LIABILITY. 

IE 611 THE DESIGN OF PRODUCTION SYSTEMS. 

IE(OR) 612 ADVANCED SCHEDULING AND ROUTING. 

IE 616 COMPUTER INTEGRATION OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS. 

IE 617 COMPUTERIZED PROCESS PLANNING. 

IE 619 CONSTRAINT MODELING OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS. 

IE 621 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 

138 



m 631 MULTI-ATTRIBUTE DECISION ANALYSIS. 

IE 641 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS, PHYSIOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE. 

BE 644 UPPER EXTREMITY BIOMECHANICS. 

IE 645 SPINE BIOMECHANICS. 

IE 646 HUMAN FACTORS IN VISUAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS. 

IE<OR) 662 STOCHASTIC SIMULATION DESIGN AND ANALYSIS. 

IE(CSC,ECE) 675 ADVANCES IN VOICE INPUT/OUTPUT COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS. 

IE 688 ADVANCED DIRECTED STUDY IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 

IE 689 ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 

IE<OR,MA) 692 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING. 

IE 693 SEMINAR IN APPLIED ERGONOMICS. 

IE 694 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN ERGONOMICS. 

IE 695 SEMINAR. 

IE 696 RESEARCH PRACTICUM IN OCCUPATIONAL BIOMECHANICS. 

m 699 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH. 

Instructional Technology - Computers 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see curriculum and 
instruction. 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering 

Degree Offered: Master of Integrated Manufacturing System Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor E. T. Sanii, Associate Director for Academic Programs 
Box 7915, (919) 515-3808, Fax: (919) 515-1675, sanii@eos.ncsu.edu 

IMSE Worid-Wide Web Home Page: http://www.eos.ncsu.edu/coe/departments/imse 

Professors: R. L. Barker, R. M. Felder, P. L. Grady, T, J. Hodgson, T. Johnson, 
R. Luo, C. J. Maday, W. L. Meier Jr., H. L. Nuttle, S. D. Roberts, W. A. Smith Jr., 
K. Tai, J. R. Wilson, S. C. Winchester, C. F. Zorowski; Professor Emeritus: R. E. 
Carawan; Associate Professors: D. R. Bahler, P. Banks-Lee, Y. A. Chen, T, G. 
Clapp, C. T. Culbreth Jr., D. Gyurcsik, Y. Fathi, T. K. Ghosh, R. E. King, J. W. 
Leach, J.-C. Lu, R. D. Rodman, J. P. Roise, A. M. Seyam, R. E. Yoimg; Assistant 
Professors: D. R. Cormier, H. Damerdji, G. L. Hodge, W. J. Jasper, M. G. Kay, Y.- 
S. Lee, M. K. Ramasubramanian, J. B. Taylor; Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. C. 
Sutton m 

The Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute (IMSEI), established in 
1 984, provides multidisciplinary graduate level education and practical training opportu- 
nities in the theory and practice of integrated manufacturing systems engineering at the 
master's degree level. IMSEI focuses on providing a manufacturing presence and a 



139 



program environment in the College of Engineering where faculty, graduate students and 
industry can engage cooperatively in multidisciplinary graduate education, basic and 
applied research, and technology transfer in areas of common interest related to modem 
manufacturing systems technology. The objective of the IMSE program is to take a 
student with traditional discipline background in engineering or the physical sciences and 
broaden the student's understanding of the multidisciplinary area of manufacturing 
systems. Particular emphasis is placed on computer integration and application in 
manufacturing. 

Admission Requirements: Admission to the IMSE master's program requires a B.S. 
degree from an accredited institution preferably in engineering or in physics, mathematics 
or computer science. 

Master's Degree Requirements: This degree requires a minimum of 27 hours of graduate 
course woric and 6 hours of research project. Five core courses, required of all students, 
present a multidisciplinary overview of subject materials basic to manufacturing systems. 
Specialization is provided in the student's plan of graduate work through the selection of 
a minimum of four electives in a specified area of concentration. The six hours of required 
individual or team research project are intended to complement and reinforce the area of 
concentration. 

Student Financial Support. Assistantships, fellowships and internships are available to 
qualified students. Out-of-state U. S. citizens with graduate assistantships qualify for in- 
state tuition rates. 

Fellowship/Internship: The IMSEI internship program has been established to provide 
a cooperative industrial and academic experience for some IMSEI students and industrial 
sponsors. Several Fellowship/Intemships awards are made available every year for special 
training in IMSEI member companies. Students who are selected to participate in the 
internship program will receive fmancial support for four semesters and one summer. 
Typically, the student will attend classes for two semesters (fall and spring), work at the 
sponsor company for the following summer and fall semester, and complete the IMSEI 
program the following spring semester. The student will use some aspect of the experience 
at the sponsor company as the basis of the required IMSEI project. 

Odter Relevant Information: The Institute is supported by an industrial afifiliates group 
of member companies. They include ABB, CP&L, GE, IBM, Northern Telecom and 
Westinghouse. The Institute interacts with member companies through an Industry 
Advisory Board and a Technical Monitors Group. 



140 



Core Cnu rKP.x (75 credit hours)^ 

CSC 510 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 

Or 
CSC 542 DATABASE MANAGEMENT 

Or 
IE(CSC) 562 COMPUTER SIMULATION TECHNIQUES 

One of the following: 

m 511 CAPITAL INVESTMENT ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 

Or 
BUS 520, 521 MANAGERIAL FINANCE: THEORY AND APUCATION 

And: 

IE 516 COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING 

IE 523 PRODUCTION PLANNING, SCHEDULING AND INVENTORY CONTROL 

MAE 542, MECHANICAL DESIGN FOR AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY 

GRADUATE rnURSE 

IMS 698 MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROJECT. 

International Development 

Degree Offered: Master of Technology for International Development 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. W. Erickson, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7112, (919) 515-3201, Fax (919) 515-6835, ed_erickson@ncsu.edu 

Professors: M. K. Beute, R. I. Bruck, S. W. Buol, C. H. Carlton, D. K. Cassel, J. G. 
Laarman, M. H. M. Mohamad, R. L. Moxley, J. K. Ocko, C. H. Proctor, M. D. 
Schuhnan, J. C. H. Shih, R. W. Slatta, M. S. Soroos, D. W. Stewart; Professors 
Emeriti: J. L. Apple, AJ. Coutu, C. B. Davey, H. D. Gross, R. A. King; Associate 
Professors: J. C. Beghin, R. H. Dorff, T. N. Hammond, H. G. Kebschull, A. C. 
Malinowski, S. E. Simonsen, T. J., Smyth, G. D. Surh, J. M. Wallace EI 

Admission Requirements: See the general requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School. 

Degree Requirements: The program of work requires: 

1. 36 semester credits, half in the relevant professional area and the remainder 
in internationalizing areas. The MTID colloquium (TID 501) is required. 

2. a work experience of a minimum of 12 weeks in a foreign country and a 
substantial report on that field experience. 



141 



3. conversational facility in one foreign language as determined by an oral 

examination. 
4. a con^)rehensive written examination, which may be required at the discretion 

of the advisory committee. 

The MTID program has curricular flexibihty. The professional specialization may be 
done in any of the 72 departments in the 10 substantive NCSU colleges and schools. The 
internationalizing courses may be drawn from a wide variety of appUcable courses 
offered throughout NCSU. The internationalizing courses may focus on a particular area 
such as Latin America or Europe; the international appUcations of principles of law, 
economics, management or administration; or a combination of the foregoing. The 
professional courses may be drawn from more than one department. The plan of 
graduate work for an MTID student must be a coherent intellectual whole with the 
requisite disciplinary integrity to satisfy the student's committee and the MTID 
coordinator, but it may be drawn from the whole breadth of NCSU. 

The program of study is tailored to the student's individual needs rather than following 
a prescribed course; therefore, the student is expected to be able to demonstrate maturity 
and assume initiative in planning his/her own course of study. The relevant department 
assists in choosing a set of courses which provide grounding in the professional area, 
and the Office of International Programs assists in identifying appropriate 
"internationalizing" courses which satisfy the student's particular needs and interests. 

GRAnUATF rnuR^Ffi 

TID 501 COLLOQUIUM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. 

TID 598 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. 

TID 599 INTERNSfflP IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. 

Landscape Architecture 

Degree Offered: Master of Landscape Architecture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. R. Rice, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor F. H. Magallanes, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7701, (919)515-8340 

Professors: A. R. Abbate, R. C. Moore, R. R. Wilkinson, D. Wood; Professors 
Emeriti: R. E. Stipe, E. G. Thurlow; Research Associate Professor: J. E. Pels; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: C. E. Roe; Assistant Professor: S. R. Raval; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: D. A. Bartelt 



142 



ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Professor: W. E, Hooker, J. C. Raulston; Lecturer: M. E. Traer 

Course offerings or research facilities are available in the following areas: site planning, 
landscape architecture, community design, regional planning and design, and resource 
management. 

Admission Requirements: The best-qualified apphcants will be accepted up to the num- 
ber of spaces that are available for new students. Exceptions to the minimvun 3.00 GPA 
may be made for students with special backgrounds, abihties and interests. 

Master 's Degree Requirements: A minimum of 36 course credits is required with a 
minimum of nine 500- or 600-series landscape architecture courses taken at the univer- 
sity. Students without previous professional degrees in landscape architecture are 
required to take additional hours of instruction up to 72 course credit hours. Programs 
of study are developed by the department's Director of Graduate Programs for all 
incoming graduate studaits. These programs outline a general course of study and state 
the number of course credits required for graduation. A final project is required. 

Other Relevant It\formation: Students have the option of including a graduate minor in 
their course of studies. Minors can be in any other graduate program offered at NCSU. 
Some examples of graduate minors are: architecture, education, horticultural science, 
civil Migineering, and parks, recreation and tourism management. Sp)ecial programs and 
labs in the Department of Landscape Architecture and the School of Design include the 
Coahtion for Co mmuni ty Conservation, the Design Research Laboratory and their pro- 
gram in environment visualization and simulation and in international summer programs. 

GRAniJATE rniJR^ESi 

LAR 510 GRAPHICS FOR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. 

LAR 511 COMMUNITY DESIGN POLICY. 

LAR 512 LANDSCAPE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. 

LAR 521 VALUES, THEORY AND METHODS OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE. 

LAR 530 ADVANCED SITE PLANNING. 

LAR 533 PLANTS AND DESIGN. 

LAR 551 ETHICS OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE. 

LAR 564 MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING TECHNIQUES IN COMMUNITY DESIGN. 

LAR 573 HISTORIC PRESERVATION. 

LAR 574 LANDSCAPE ANT) TOWNSCAPE CONSERVATION. 

LAR 575 DEVELOPMENT PLANNING. 

LAR 576 MASTER PLANNING AND DESIGN MANAGEMENT. 

LAR 582 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LANDSCAPE ARCIHTECTURE. 

LAR 595 INDEPENDENT STUDY. 

LAR 600 LANDSCAPE DESIGN STUDIO. 

LAR 611 ADVANCED COMMUNITY DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT CONTROL. 

LAR 612 SOCIAL FACTORS ANALYSIS IN SITE PLANNING. 



143 



LAR 681 FINAL PROJECT RESEARCH IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE. 
LAR 688 nNAL PROJECT STUDIO IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE. 

Liberal Studies 

Degree Offered: M.A. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor CD. Korte, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7107, (919) 515-2479 

The Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (MALS) program is an interdisciplinary graduate 
program which is administered by the Division of Multidisciplinary Studies and offered 
by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. This is a broad, interdisciplinary 
program of part-time graduate study that integrates and expands awareness and that is 
geared to the student's personal interests. Each student, in consultation with an academic 
advisor, designs an individual program of study around an interdisciplinary theme or 
topic that is of intrinsic interest to the student or that relates to the student's professional 
or vocational interests. Students take graduate courses across a range of NC State 
departments as well as MALS seminars designed specifically for the program. 

Admissions Requirements: Students entering the master's program in Uberal studies 
must have an undergraduate degree. In addition to the material required by the Graduate 
School, studoats applying are asked to submit a statement describing their objectives in 
doing a degree in liberal studies and a writing sample. GRE scores are not required. All 
appUcants are interviewed. 

Master's Degree Requirements'. Thirty hours of course work made up of (1) a minimum 
of three MALS seminars, (2) eighteen hours representing the student's interdisciplinary 
theme or concentration, and (3) a three-hour culminating project. Examples of concen- 
trations that are well supported by graduate courses in the NC State curriculum are: 
science, technology and society; the American experience; and leadership 

GRAniJATE rniJRRER 

MLS 601 SEMINAR IN LIBERAL STUDIES. 

MLS 696 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN LIBERAL STUDIES. 

MLS 697 INDEPENDENT PROJECT IN LIBERAL STUDIES. 

Life Sciences 

Several departments in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences offer programs 
leading to the Master of Agriculture and/or the Master of Life Sciences. These are non- 
144 



thesis degrees that are designed for students who wish to emphasize course work in a 
graduate program. As such they require a total of 36 semester hours. A minimum of 
four semester hours in special problems is required and not more than six semester 
hours will be allowed. A minimum of 20 credit hours of 500- or 600-level course work 
is required. 

Management 

Degree Offered: M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. G. Allen, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7229, (919) 515-5584, msm@ncsu.edu 

Professors: R. P. Bums, R. L. Clark, G. Dickson, C. P. Jones, S. E. Margohs, S. G. 
Pantula, D. Pearce, S. D. Roberts, J. W. Wilson, S. C. Winchester; Associate 
Professors: R. C. Abt, A, Agrawal, S. Barr, D. L. Baumer, S. Chapman, Y. A. Chen, 
J. C. Dutton Jr., E. A. McDermed, M. B. McEkoy, K. Mitchell, A. Padilla, J. C. 
Poindexter Jr., G. J. Zuckerman; Assistant Professors: C. C. Bozarth, K. S. Davis, S. 
K. Maikham, A. Massey, M. Montoya-Weiss, P. Mulvey, K. Schenk, G. Voss, G. S. 
Young 

Since its inception in 1976, the Master of Science in Management (MSM) program has 
taken a distinctive, innovative approach to management education. The MSM focuses 
on aspects of management that have traditionally been neglected in business schools, 
especially the management of information, production and technology. A new integrative 
curriculum introduced in fall 1995 emphasizes business processes, such as new product 
development, rather than traditional organizational functions, such as marketing or 
finance. 

Studaats begin the program with a course that provides an overview of critical business 
processes, an introduction to business strategy, and intitial training in individual and 
group effectiveness. The integrated nature of the program is maintained through lab 
sessions that approach managemait problems using tools from a wide range of courses, 
along with capstone courses in strategy and implementation. In their last semester, all 
students must complete a practicum where they work on a management issue in a real 
organization. 

Another distinctive aspect of the MSM program is the integration of advanced courses 
in technology and managment-related topics in other colleges at NC State into its cur- 
riculum. MSM students take courses in industrial engineering, statistics, computer 
science and natural resources to give them skills and knowledge not generally available 



145 



in most business schools. In addition, many students in other colleges at NC State take 
minors in management. 

MSM Curriculum: The MSM curriculum requires that every student complete the core 
curriculum hsted below, along with courses in a technical concentration, for a total of 
45 credit hours. Students also must complete a series of integrated management labs. 

Manag ement Fji virnnni<»nt 

BUS 501 LEGAL AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT OF MANAGEMENT 

BUS 502 GLOBAL AND CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT OF MANAGEMENT 
ECG 507 MICROECONOMICS AND THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT 
ECG 508 MACROECONOMICS AND THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT 

ManagMUftnt SItil U in an Integrative C.nnteYt 

BUS 531 MANAGERIAL PROCESSES AND EFFECTIVENESS 

BUS 533 LEADERSHIP IN MANAGEMENT 

BUS 581 LONG-RANGE ANALYSIS AND STRATEGY 

Mnnagi»nn»nt Fiinrrinna 

BUS 521 MANAGERIAL FINANCE 

BUS 532 STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 
BUS 541 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
BUS 561 MARKETING MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGY 
BUS 571 PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 



ACC 581 SURVEY OF FINANCIAL ACCOUTNING 
ACC 582 SURVEY OF MANAGMENT ACCOUNTING 
ST 513 STATISTICS FOR MANAGEMENT 



BUS 574 MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY 
BUS 583 MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM 

Minimum of 9 hours of additional courses in the technical concentration. Technical 
concentrations include management of technology, management information systems and 
operations management. 

Admission Requirements: Students must have previous courses in calculus, principles 
of economics (micro and macro) and statistics, as well as knowledge of personal com- 
puters including word processing and spreadsheet software. In addition to basic 
Graduate School admission requirements, apphcants must submit recent GMAT scores. 
Admission decisions are based on academic performance and potential, GMAT scores, 
the applicant's essay indicating how the MSM degree will further his/her career and 
work experience, where appropriate. For further information, there is an MSM Home 
Page that can be accessed off the home page of the College of Management. 

Other Relevant litformation: Day and evening courses are available; students can attend 
on either a part-time or full-time basis. 

146 



Minor in Management: Students enrolled in master's and doctoral programs can 
complete the minor by taking courses that meet requirements for the MSM degree. 
Master's students must take nine hours, including both ACC 581 and BUS 531. 
Doctoral students must take 15 hours, including both ACC 581 and BUS 531. This is 
distinct from the departmental minor in business management which simply requires 
nine hours of course work at the 500 level or above for master's students. 

nRADUATF rnriR^F^ 

BUS 501 LEGAL AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT IN MANAGEMENT. 

BUS 502 GLOBAL AND CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT IN MANAGEMENT. 

BUS 505 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS. 

BUS(ECG) 512 LAW AND ECONOMICS. 

BUS 520 MANAGERIAL FINANCE: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS. 

BUS 521 MANAGERIAL FINANCE. 

BUS 522 PORTFOLIO AND CAPITAL MARKET THEORY. 

BUS 524 FINANCIAL MARKETS. 

BUS 530 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. 

BUS 531 MANAGERIAL PROCESSES AND EFFECTIVENESS. 

BUS 532 STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. 

BUS 533 LEADERSHIP IN MANAGEMENT. 

BUS 541 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 

BUS 546 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS. 

BUS 555 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS. 

BUS 560 MARKETING MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGY. 

BUS 561 MARKETING MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGY. 

BUS 562 RESEARCH METHODS IN MARKETING. 

BUS 571 PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. 

BUS 574 MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY. 

BUS 575 MANAGING FOR QUALITY. 

BUS 581 LONG RANGE ANALYSIS AND STRATEGY. 

BUS 583 MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM. 

BUS(TAM) 585 MARKET RESEARCH IN TEXTILES. 

BUS 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. 

BUS 598 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. 

BUS 625 LONG RANGE PLANNING IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY. 

BUS(ECG) 650 ECONOMIC DECISION THEORY. 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. J. Pietrafesa, Head of the Department 
Professor G. S. Janowitz, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8208, (919) 515-7776, janowitz@ncsu.edu 

Distinguished University Scholar: T. F. Malone 
Scholar in Residence: R. R. Braham 

147 



Professors: S. P. S. Aiya, V. V. Cavaroc Jr., J. M. Davis, D. J. DeMaster, R. V. 
Fodor, D. Kamykowski, S. Raman, V. K. Saxena, T. G. Wolcott; Research Professor: 
V. P. Aneja; Visiting Professors: T. F. Clark, T. S. Hopkins, H. G. Reichle Jr., D. A. 
Russell; Adjunct Professors: A. H. Hines, R. V. Madala, P. J. Minnett, J. M. 
Pelissier, S. R. Riggs, W. H. Snyder; Professors Emeriti: H. S. Brown, L. J, 
Langfelder, C, J. Leith, W, J. Saucier, C. W. Welby; Associate Professors: N. E. 
Blair, J. P. Hibbaid, M. M. Kimberley, C. E. Knowles, S. E. Koch, E. L. Leithold, 
Y. Lin, J. M. Morrison, A. J. Riordan, F. H. M. Semazzi, P. Shaw, W. J. 
Showers, E. F. Stoddard, G. F. Watson; Visiting Associate Professors: M. L. 
Kaplan, D. L. Wolcott; Adjunct Associate Professors: M. G. Bevis, S. Businger, S. 
W. Chang, A. W. Hulbert, C. J. Nappo, R. W. Wiener; Assistant Professors: T. G. 
Drake, D. B. Eggleston, D. G. Evans,S. W. Snyder.; Visiting Assistant Professors: 
D. G. Schowalter, L. Xie; Adjunct Assistant Professors: T. B. Curtin, M. DeMaria, 
A. F. Hanna, G. J. Kirkpatrick, J. R. Pawhk, S. W. Ross, R. J. Wayland 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: B. J. Copeland, J. M. Miller, F. Y. Sorrell Jr., C. C. Tung; Associate 
Professor: J. M, Burkholder; Visiting Assistant Professor: L. L. Spence 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL ADJUNCT GRADUATE FACULTY 

L. B. Cahoon, D. G. Lindquist, J. F. Pamell, M. H. Posey, R. D. Roer 

Graduate majors in atmospheric science, geology, geophysics, and marine sciences are 
offered. Within marine sciences the subdisciphnes of biological, chemical, geological 
and physical oceanography are recognized by the profession. 

Admission Requirements: An M.S. degree is required for entry into the Ph.D. program. 
The GRE Test scores are required for apphcants in geology and biological oceano- 
graphy. A B.S. degree in a basic or apphed science, mathematics or engineering is 
required for eaixy into the M.S. program in atmospheric science, geology or geophysics, 
biological oceanography, chemical oceanography, geological oceanography, or physical 
oceanography. Field camp is required of all applicants for the M.S. program in geology. 
An M.S. degree with a non-thesis option for students on leave for a fixed period from 
government positions is available and admission to this option must be requested at the 
time of apphcation. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Specific course requirements are determined by the 
advisory committee of each student. However, MEA 695 Seminar is required of all 
M.S. students no later than the third semester in residence. Marine science students are 
required to take core courses in two of the three subdisciphnes other than their own. 



148 



Doctoral Degree Requirements: Specific courses are detennined by the students 
advisory committee. Registration in seminar, MEA 695, is required of all Ph.D. stu- 
dents no later than the fourth semester in residence. Marine science students are 
required to take core courses in all three subdisciplines other than their own; this 
requirement may be fulfilled at the M.S. level. 

Student Financial Support: Research and teaching assistantships are available. 

Other Relevant Information: Students are assigned advisors upon admission, and thesis 
research should commence as soon as possible. 

nRAnuATF rnvR^FM m common to all me a ^TimENTR 

MEA 695 SEMINAR. 
MEA 699 RESEARCH. 

GRADUATE COURSES 
Atmospheric Science 

MEA 501 ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS. 

MEA 512 SATELLITE METEOROLOGY. 

MEA 514 ADVANCED PHYSICAL METEOROLOGY. 

MEA 524 DYNAMIC METEOROLOGY. 

MEA 525 NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION. 

MEA 526 AIR-SEA INTERACTION. 

MEA 527 PLANETARY BOUNDARY LAYER. 

MEA 528 COASTAL METEOROLOGY. 

MEA 530 MESOSCALE MODELING. 

MEA 555 METEOROLOGY OF THE BIOSPHERE. 

MEA 556 AIR POLLUTION METEOROLOGY. 

MEA 557 ADVANCED CLOUD AND PRECIPITATION PHYSICS. 

MEA 558 ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS. 

MEA(MAE) 563 GEOPHYSICAL FLUID MECHANICS. 

MEA 593 SPECIAL TOPICS. 

MEA 627 ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE. 

MEA 635 ADVANCED WEATHER ANALYSIS. 

MEA 640 MESOSCALE DYNAMICS. 

MEA 656 ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION. 

MEA(MAE) 663 ADVANCED GEOPHYSICAL FLUID MECHANICS. 

Earth Science 

MEA 500 REGIONAL GEOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA. 

MEA 510 GEOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

MEA 515 TOPICS IN APPALACHIAN GEOLOGY. 

MEA 522 PETROLEUM GEOLOGY. 

MEA 523 INTRODUCTION TO SUBSURFACE WELL EVALUATION. 

MEA 545 ADVANCED IGNEOUS PETROLOGY. 

MEA 546 ADVANCED METAMORPIUC PETROLOGY. 



149 



MEA 551 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY. 

MEA 562 APPLIED SEDIMENTARY ANALYSIS. 

MEA 564 DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS AND LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY. 

MEA 565 HYDROGEOLOGY. 

MEA 566 HYDROGEOLOGY OF GROUNDWATER POLLUTION AND PROTECTION. 

MEA 567 GEOCHEMISTRY. 

MEA 570 EXPLORATION AND ENGINEERING GEOPHYSICS. 

MEA 572 LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS FOR INVESTIGATION OF THE SEABED. 

MEA 573 ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY. 

MEA 574 BIOGEOCHEMISTRY. 

MEA 575 GEOPHYSICAL FIELD METHODS. 

MEA 576 SEISMIC EXPLORTION FOR OIL. 

MEA 577 SEDIMENTARY GEOCHEMISTRY. 

MEA 583 PHOTOGEOLOGY AND REMOTE SENSING. 

MEA 588 REGIONAL TECTONICS. 

MEA 592 SPECIAL TOPICS. 

MEA 610 MARINE SEDIMENTOLOGY. 

MEA 630 GEOTECTONICS. 

MEA 670 ADVANCED GEOPHYSICS L 

MEA 671 ADVANCED GEOPHYSICS IL 

Marine Science 

MEA 501 ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS. 

MEA 510 GEOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

MEA 511 MARINE SEDIMENT TRANSPORT. 

MEA 516 DYNAMICS OF SHELF CIRCULATION. 

MEA(ZO) 520 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

MEA 526 AIR-SEA INTERACTION. 

MEA (ZO) 534 MARINE BENTHIC ECOLOGY. 

MEA 540 FOURIER ANALYSIS OF GEOPHYSICAL DATA. 

MEA (CE) 541 GRAVITY WAVE THEORY I. 

MEA 559 SYNOPTIC PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

MEA 560 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

MEA 561 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

MEA(MAE) 563 GEOPHYSICAL FLUID MECHANICS. 

MEA 568 OCEAN CIRCULATION. 

MEA 569 THE PHYSICAL DYNAMICS OF ESTUARIES. 

MEA 571 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

MEA 572 LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS FOR INVESTIGATION OF THE SEABED. 

MEA 573 ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY. 

MEA 574 BIOGEOCHEMISTRY. 

MEA 591 SPECIAL TOPICS. 

MEA 613 CONTINENTAL MARGIN SEDIMENTATION. 

MEA 622 MARINE PLANKTON ECOLOGY. 

MEA(ZO) 623 ADVANCES IN MARINE COMMUNITY ECOLOGY. 

MEA(ZO) 624 ECOLDGY OF FISHES. 

MEA(MAE) 663 ADVANCED GEOPHYSICAL FLUID MECHANICS. 

MEA(MAE) 664, 665 PERTURBATION METHOD IN FLUID MECHANICS I, II. 

MEA 674 MARINE GEOCHEMISTRY. 

Master of Engineering 

For program information, see engineering. 

150 



Materials Science and Engineering 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Materials Science and Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. J. Hren, Head of the Department 
Professor C. C. Kock, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7907, (919) 515-3858, fahmy@mte.ncsu.edu 

Distinguished University Professor: J. Narayan 

Distinguished University Research Professor: J. J. Cuomo 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor and Kobe Steel Distinguished University 

Professor: R. F. Davis 

Professors: K. J. Bachmann, R. B, Benson Jr., A. A. Fahmy, A. I. Kingon, K. L. 
Murty, G. A. Rozgonyi, P. E. Russell, R. O. Scattergood; Research Professor: D. 
M. Maher; Adjunct Professors: O. Auciello, G. E. McGuire, J. L. Routbort, J. C. 
Russ, F. Shimura; Professors Emeriti: W. W. Austin Jr., H. Conrad, J. K. Magor, 
K. L. Moazed, H. I. Palmour, H. H. Stadelmaier, R. F. Stoops; Associate Professors: 
C. M. Balik, D. W. Brenner, N. A. El-Masry; Research Associate Professor: J. 
Kasichainula; Visiting Associate Professors: D. P. Griffis, J. C. Russ; Adjunct 
Associate Professors: K. Das, J. T. Glass, J. T. Prater, I. Turlik; Associate Professor 
Emerius: J. V. Hamme; Assistant Professors: R. L. Porter, Z. Sitar, R. J. Spontak; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: H. A. West U 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: J. A. Bailey, S. M. Bedair, K. S. Havner, Y. Horie, G. Lucovsky, R. J. 
Nananich, A. Reisman; Associate Professor. H. H. Lamb; Assistant Professor: G. N. 
Parsons 

Materials and materials limitations pervade all of the engineering and high technology 
fields that are an integral part of our society. Graduate programs in this department 
focus on understanding the structure, structure modification and properties of materials 
and the development of new or improved materials and advanced processing methods 
which are critical links between the design and the realization of new systems. 

Admission Requirements: In addition to the general admission requirements as set by 
the Graduate School, the department requires submission of GRE scores or convincing 
evidence of the competence of the appUcant and his/her abihty to satisfy the require- 



151 



ments for the graduate degree for which he/she is seeking admission. Li addition, for 
^^Ucants whose native tongue is other than Enghsh, the minimum acceptable TOEFL 
score is 575. 

Master's Degrees Requirements: The minimum requirements for the Master of Mater- 
ials Sciaice and Engineering degree are 33 credit hours not including seminar credit but 
including 3 credit hours for a project course and 9 to 12 hours in one or more support- 
ing fields as approved by the director of graduate programs of which no more than 3 
credit hours may be at the 400 level. The M.S. degree has the minimum requirement 
of 30 credit hours not including seminar credit but including six credit hours for 
research, a minimum of 3 credit hours at the 600 level, excluding research credit, and 
9 credit hours in one or more supporting fields of which no more than 3 credit hours 
may be at the 400 level. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The minimum requirements for the doctoral degree are 
51 credit hours including 9 credit hours for research, a minimum of 9 credit hours at the 
600 level, excluding research credit, and 12 credit hours in one or more supporting 
fields of which no more than 3 credit hours may be at the 400 level. 

Student Financial Support: In recent years more than three quarters of students in the 
graduate program have received financial support in one form or another. The depart- 
m^it offers a number of teaching and research assistantships on a competitive basis to 
qualified students. Also available are a number of federal-, state- and industry-funded 
fellowships and supplan^its which generally pay for the tuition in addition to a stipend. 

Other Relevant Ir\formation: The department reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the 
field of materials science and engineering. A substantial number of current graduate 
students majored in fields other than but related to materials, and the department has a 
significant number of associated graduate faculty from other departments supervising 
thesis and dissertation research. 

FOR GRAnUATFS AND ADVAf^rFD UNnERnRAniJATES 

MAT 500 MODERN CONCEPTS IN MATERIALS SCIENCE. 

MAT 501 DIFFUSION AND MASS TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN SOUDS. 

MAT 502 DEFECTS IN SOLIDS. 

MAT 504 ELECTRICAL, OPTICAL AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS. 

MAT 505 MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS. 

MAT 506 PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS AND KINETICS. 

MAT(CH) 507 CHEMICAL CONCEPTS IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. 

MAT 508 THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS. 

MAT(NE)509 NULEAR MATERIALS. 

MAT 510 ELEMENTS OF CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND DIFFRACTION. 

MAT 511 STEREOLOGY AND IMAGE ANALYSIS. 

MAT 512 SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY. 

MAT 515 FUNDAMENTALS OF TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY. 

MAT(NE)525 NUCLEAR MATERIALS. 



152 



MAT(MAE) 531 MATERIALS PROCESSING BY DEFORMATION. 

MAT(MAE) 532 FUNDAMENTALS OF METAL MACHINING THEORY. 

MAT 533 ADVANCED CERAMIC ENGINEERING DESIGN. 

MAT 541 PRINCIPLES OF CORROSION. 

MAT 556 COMPOSITE MATERIALS. 

MAT 560 MATERIALS SCIENCE IN PROCESSING OF SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES. 

MAT(TC) 561 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY OF POLYMERS. 

MAT(TC) 562 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF IHGH POLYMERS-BULK PROPERTIES. 

MAT(NE) 573 COMPUTER EXPERIMENTS IN MATERIALS AND NUCLEAR ENGINEERING. 

MAT 575 STRUCTURE OF SEMICRYSTALLINE POLYMERS. 

MAT 595 ADVANCED MATERIALS EXPERIMENTS. 

MAT 610 ADVANCED CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND DIFFRACTION. 

MAT 612 ADVANCED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND SURFACE ANALYSIS. 

MAT 621 THEORY AND STRUCTURE OF AMORPHOUS MATERIALS. 

MAT 623 THEORY AND STRUCTURE OF METALLIC MATERIALS. 

MAT 631 THIN FILM AND COATING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY I. 

MAT 632 THIN FILM AND COATING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY II. 

MAT 633 ADVANCED MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS. 

MAT 660 DEFECTS, DIFFUSION AND ION IMPLANTATION IN SEMI-CONDUCTORS. 

MAT(CH,TC) 662 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS-SOLUTION PROPER- "US 

MAT 691, 692 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. 

MAT 695 MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING SEMINAR. 

MAT 699 MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH. 

Mathematics 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. H. Martin Jr., Head of the Department 

Professor S. Schecter, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professor E. L. Stitzinger, Associate Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8205, (919) 525-3964,schecter@math.ncsu.edu, stitz@inath.ncsu.edu 

Drexel Professor and University Professor: H. T. Banks 

Professors: J. W. Bishir, E. E. Bumiston, S. L. Campbell, R. E. Chandler, M. T. 
Chu, E. N. Chukwu, L. O. Chung, J. D. Cohen, J. M. Danby, J. C. Dunn, A. C. 
Fauntleroy, R. O. Fulp, R. E. Hartwig, K. Ito, E. L. Kaltofen, C. T. Kelley, K. 
Koh, J. Luh, J. A. MarUn, C. D. Meyer Jr., K. C. Misra, C. Pao, E. L. Peterson, 
M. S. Putcha, J. F. Selgrade, M. Shearer, C. E. Siewert, J. W. Silverstein, M. F. 
Singer, R. E. White; Professors Emeriti: R. C. Bullock, J. M. Clarkson, W. J. 
Harrington, J. Levine, L. B. Martin Jr., P. A. Nickel, H. V. Park, N. J. Rose, H. 
Sagan, R. A. Struble; Associate Professors: G. D. Faulkner, B. G. Fitzpatrick, J. E. 
Franke, D. E. Garoutte, A. G. Helminck, I. Ipsen, A. Kheyfets, T. J. Lada, D. 
M. Latch, X. Lin, L. K. Norris, L. B. Page, R. T. Ramsay, J. Rodriguez, R. 
Silber, H. T. Iran; Associate Professor Emeritus: D. F. Ullrich; Assistant Professors: 



153 



H. J. Charlton, F. J. Garaizar, P. A. Gr^naud, D. J. Hansen, P. Hitczenko, N. Jing, 
W. M. McEneaney, W. R. McKinney, S. O. Paur, F. L.Reitich, J. S. Scroggs 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Associate Professor: L, V. Stiff 

The Department of Mathematics offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of 
Sci^ice aikd Doctor of Riilosophy in mathematics and in appUed mathematics. Students 
may opt for the concentration in computational mathematics, which is attached to the 
program in apphed mathanatics. Through the Center for Research in Scientific Compu- 
tation, which is housed in the Department of Mathematics, students may participate in 
the industrial appUed mathematics program, a program of joint research endeavors with 
industrial and governmental partners. 

Admissions Requirements: AppUcants for admission should have an undergraduate or 
masters degree in mathematics or the equivalent. This should include courses in ad- 
vanced calculus, modem algebra and linear algebra. AppUcants with degrees in other 
subjects may be admitted but may be required to take certain undergraduate courses in 
mathematics without receiving graduate credit. It is recommended that appUcants take 
the GRE Advanced Test in Mathematics. 

Master of Science Requirements: hi addition to course requirements, the M.S. degree 
requires a written master's project for 3 hours credit. 

Ph.D. Requirements: A student will typically take 50-60 semester hours of course 
credits for the Ph.D. These courses include one semester of modem algebra and one 
semester of mathematical analysis. The written preliminary examination consists of 
examinations in three selected areas of mathematics. Prior to taking the preliminary oral 
examination, the stud^it must demonstrate a working knowledge of a foreign language. 
The research dissertation should represent a substantial contribution to an area of 
mathematics or its apphcations. 

Student Firumcial Support: Teaching assistantships and some research assistantships are 
available. Teaching assistants benefit from a stmctured program of training in 
imiversity-level teaching. 

Other Iitformation: The Department of Mathematics has more than twenty workstations 
devoted exclusively to its graduate students. Students also have access to the high- 
performance computing and visualization equipment at the North Carolina Super- 
computer Center. 



154 



nRADUATF rnURSiFS 

MA 501 ADVANCED MATHEMATICS FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS I. 

MA 502 ADVANCED MATHEMATICS FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS II. 

MA(OR) 504 INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING. 

MA(IE,OR) 505 LINEAR PROGRAMMING. 

MA 507 ANALYSIS FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. 

MA 508 GEOMETRY FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. 

MA 509 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. 

MA 510 SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. 

MA 511 ADVANCED CALCULUS L 

MA 512 ADVANCED CALCULUS IL 

MA 513 INTRODUCTION TO COMPLEX VARIABLES. 

MA 515 ANALYSIS L 

MA 517 INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY. 

MA 518 INTRODUCTION TO MANIFOLD THEORY. 

MA 519 NONLINEAR DYNAMICS AND CHAOS. 

MA 520 UNEAR ALGEBRA. 

MA 521 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA L 

MA 522 COMPUTER ALGEBRA. 

MA 524 MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES I. 

MA 525 MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES II. 

MA(CSC) 529 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I. 

MA(CSC) 530 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II. 

MA(E,OR) 531 DYNA\aC SYSTEMS AND MULTIVARIABLE CONTROL I. 

MA 532 ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I. 

MA 534 INTRODUCTION TO PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

MA 535 STABILITY AND TIME OPTIMAL CONTROL OF HEREDITARY SYSTEMS L 

MA(ST) 541 THEORY OF PROBABILITY I. 

MA(ST) 542 INTRODUCTION TO STOCHASTIC PROCESSES. 

MA 544 COMPUTER EXPERIMENTS IN MATHEMATICAL PROBABIUTY. 

MA 545 SET THEORY AND FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS. 

MA(PY) 555 MATHEMATICAL INTRODUCTION TO CELESTIAL MECHANICS. 

MA(PY)556 ORBITAL MECHANICS. 

MA(BMA,ST) 571 BIOMATHEMATICS L 

MA(BMA,ST) 572 BIOMATHEMATICS II. 

MA 581 SPECIAL TOPICS. 

MA 583 NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

MA 584 NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS-FINITE DIF- 
FERENCE METHODS. 

MA(CSC,OR) 585 GRAPH THEORY. 

MA(IE,OR)586 NETWORK FLOWS. 

MA 587 NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS-FINITE ELE- 
MENT METHOD. 

MA 600 ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II. 

MA 602 PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

MA 604 TOPOLOGY. 

MA(ST,OR) 606 NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING. 

MA(NE) 607 EXACT AND APPROXIMATE SOLUTIONS IN PARTICLE TRANSPORT THEO- 
RY. 

MA 608 NUMERICAL NONLINEAR PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

MA(BMA,OR,ST) 610 STOCHASTIC MODELING. 

MA 611 ANALYTIC FUNCTION THEORY I. 

MA 612 ANALYTIC FUNCTION THEORY II. 

MA 613 TECHNIQUES OF COMPLEX ANALYSIS. 

MA(OR) 614 INTEGER PROGRAMMING. 



155 



MA(ST) 617, 618 MEASURE THEORY AND ADVANCED PROBABIUTY. 

MA 620 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 11. 

MA 622 UNEAR TRANSFORMATIONS AND MATRIX THEORY. 

MA 623 THEORY OF MATRICES AND APPUCATIONS. 

MA 625 LIE ALGEBRAS. 

MA 626 ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY. 

MA(OR) 629 VECTOR SPACE METHODS IN SYSTEM OPTIMIZATION. 

MA(E,OR) 631 DYNAMIC SYSTEMS AND MULTIVARIABLE CONTROL II. 

MA 635 STABIUTY AND TIME OPTIMAL CONTROL OF HEREDITARY SYSTEMS II. 

MA 647 ANALYSIS IL 

MA 648 ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS. 

MA 661 INTRODUCTION TO RIEMANNIAN GEOMETRY. 

MA 662 GEOMETRICAL STRUCTURES ON FIBER BUNDLES. 

MA 672 ADVANCED NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA. 

MA(CSC) 673 PARALLEL ALGORITHMS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTATION. 

MA 674 NONLINEAR EQUATIONS AND UNCONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION. 

(The subject matter in the following special topics courses varies from year to year. The 

topics and instructors are announced well in advance by the department.) 

MA 681 SPECIAL TOPICS IN REAL ANALYSIS. 

MA 682 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPLEX ANALYSIS. 

MA 683 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ALGEBRA. 

MA 684 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMBINATORIAL ANALYSIS. 

MA 685 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. 

MA 686 SPECIAL TOPICS IN TOPOLOGY. 

MA 687 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOMETRY. 

MA 688 SPECIAL TOPICS IN DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

MA 689 SPECIAL TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

MA(IE,OR) 692 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING. 

MA 697 MASTER'S PROJECT. 

MA 699 RESEARCH. 

Mathematics Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see mathematics and science 
education. 

Mathematics and Science Education 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., Ed.D., M.S., M.Ed. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. R. Kolb, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor W. M. Waters Jr., Director of Graduate Programs, Mathematics 
Education, waters@poe.coe,ncsu.edu 

Professor D. A. Adams, Director of Graduate Programs, Occupational Education, 
daadanis@poe.coe.ncsu.edu 

Assistant Professor S. L. Wesfcrook, Director of Graduate Programs, Science Educat- 
ion, westbrk@poe.coe.ncsu.edu 



156 



Associate Professor R. E. Wenig, Director of Graduate Programs, Technology Edu- 
cation, wenig@poe.coe.ncsu.edu 
Box 7801, (919) 515-2239 

Professor: L. M. Clark; Professors Emeriti: N. D. Anderson, J. K. Coster, D. M. 
Hanson, J. T. Nerden, D. W. Olson, H. E. Speece; Associate Professors: S. B. 
Berenson, V. W. DeLuca, W. J. Haynie m, K. S. Norwood, J. C. Park, R. E. 
Peterson, L. V. Stiif, L. W. Watson, J. H. Wheatley; Research Associate Professor: 
H. S. Stubbs; Associate Professors Emeriti: C. D. Bryant, J. R. Clary, W. L. Cox, T. 
R. Miller, H. A. Shannon, T. B.Young; Assistant Professosr: G. S. Carter, W. J. 
Vander Wall; Assistant Professor Emeriti: J. L. Crow, T. C. Shore Jr. 

The Department of Mathematics and Science Education offers graduate programs in 
occupational education and technology education that lead to the degrees of Master of 
Science, Master of Education and Doctor of Education. Students take courses in their 
educational specialty, in general professional education and in a social science cognate 
area. Graduate programs in mathematics education and science education lead to the 
degrees of Master of Sci^ice, Master of Education and Doctor of Philosophy. Students 
take courses in their educational specialty in one of the teaching specializations: bio- 
logical sciences, chemistry, computer science, earth science, interdisciplinary science, 
mathematics, physics, statistics. 

Master's programs are offered leading to graduate-level (G) certification as a teacher 
of mathematics, science, technology or occupational exploration at grades 6-9 or 9-12 
for those who have initial (A) certification. Programs are also available for those seeking 
advanced graduate-level (AG) certification as a teacher or certification as a local 
vocational director. Students may choose a program to prepare for teaching careers in 
post-secondary education. 

Admission Requirements: Applicants for all of the M.S. and M.Ed, degrees and Ed.D. 
in occupational education or technology education may submit recent scores from the 
GRE General Test or on the Miller's Analogy Test. AppUcants for the Ph.D. in 
mathematics education or science education must submit recent scores from the GRE 
General Test. Academic and professional background necessary for admission differs 
by specific program. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The master's degree programs require a minimum of 
36 semester hours of graduate work. Students who elect the M.S. substitute up to 6 
semester hours of thesis research for part of the course load. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: (Ed.D.) A minimum of 90 semester hours of graduate 
work beyond the baccalaureate degree is required including a minimum of 12 semester 
hours of dissertation research. (Ph.D.) A minimum of 45 semester hours of course 
work, a minimum of 12 semester hours of dissertation research and one foreign 

157 



language is required beyond the master's degree requirements. For both degrees, 
studaits may be required to supplement their course work with internships and/or other 
experiential activities to meet competencies. 

Student Financial Support 

A small number of teaching and research assistantships are available and out-of-state 
tuition remission may be available for one year to students on assistantships. 

nRADUATE rnuR^FK 

EMS 511 IMPUCATIONS OF MATHEMATICAL CONTENT, STRUCTURE, AND PROCESSES 
FOR THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

EMS 512 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN ELEMENTARY AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 

EMS 526 TEACHING IN COLLEGE. 

EMS 570 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS EDUCATION. 

EMS 575 FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE EDUCATION. 

EMS 577 IMPROVING CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION IN SCIENCE. 

EMS 592 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MATHEMATICS TEACHING. 

EMS 594 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN SCIENCE TEACHING. 

EMS 599 RESEARCH PROJECTS IN MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION. 

EMS 603 TEACHING MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE IN HIGHER EDUCATION. 

EMS 604 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION IN SCIENCE AND MATHE- 
MATICS. 

EMS 60S EDUCATION AND SUPERVISION OF TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS AND SCI- 
ENCE. 

EMS 621 INTERNSHIP IN MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION. 

EMS 641 PRACTICUM IN SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION. 

EMS 690 SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION. 

EMS 695 SEMINAR IN SCIENCE EDUCATION. 

EMS 699 THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 

EOE 501 PHILOSOPHY OF OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 503 CAREERA'OCATIONAL EDUCATION FOR THE HANDICAPPED. 

EOE 505 CURRICULUM MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT. 

EOE 506 COOPERATIVE OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 510 CAREER EXPLORATION. 

EOE 512 ANALYSIS OF OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION, TRENDS AND LABOR MARKET. 

EOE 517 PRACTICUM IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 545 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN MARKETING EDUCATION. 

EOE 551 TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: A DISCIPLINE. 

EOE 552 CURRICULA FOR EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES. 

EOE 555 DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION. 

EOE 558 TEACHING CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING. 

EOE 565 ADVANCED TRADE ANALYSIS AND COURSE CONSTRUCTION. 

EOE 597 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 598 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 599 RESEARCH PROJECTS IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 602 LAWS, REGULATIONS AND POLICIES AFFECTING OCCUPATIONAL 
EDUCATION. 

EOE 609 SEMINAR IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 612 FINANCE, ACCOUNTING AND MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 
PROGRAMS. 

EOE 621 INTERNSHIP IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 645 MARKETING EDUCATION PROGRAM MANAGEMENT. 

EOE 655 TECHNICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM. 

158 



EOE 662 PLANNING AND ORGANIZING INDUSTRIAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

PROGRAMS. 

EOE 679 RESEARCH APPLICATION IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 698 ADVANCED SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION. 

EOE 699 THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 



Mechanical Engineering 



For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see mechanical and aero- 
space engineering. 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Degrees OfTered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Mechanical Engmeering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor F. R. DeJamette, Head of the Department 
Professor G. K. F. Lee, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7910, (919) 515-3026, glee@eos.ncsu.edu 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professors: H. A. Hassan, M. N. Ozisik 
R. J. Reynolds Industries Professor: C. F. Zorowski 

Professors: E. M. Afify, J. A. Bailey, A. E. Bayoumi, T. A. Dow, H. M. Eckerlin, 
J. A. Edwards, T. H. Hodgson, R. F. Keltie, C. Kleinstreuer, C. J. Maday, D. S. 
McRae, J. C. Mulligan, R.T, Nagel, J, N. Perkins, L. H. Royster, L. M. Silverberg, 
F. Y. Sorrell Jr., J. S. Strenkowski, G. D. Walberg; Visiting Professor: M. M. Fikry; 
Ac^'unct Professors: J. P. Archie, Jr., D. P. DeWitt, W. D. Erickson, J. Juang, D. E. 
Klett, E. R. McClure, R. A. Whisnant; Professors Emeriti: R. A. Burton, M. H. 
Clayton, B. H. Garcia Jr., W. C. Griffith, F. J. Hale, F. D. Hart, M. N. Ozisik, F. 
O. Smetana, J. K. Whitfield, J. Woodbum; Associate Professors: M. A. Boles, N. 
Chokani, J. W. David, J. W. Eischen, R. D. Gould, R. R. Johnson, E. C. Klang, 
J. W. Leach, P. I. H. Ro, F. Yuan; Research Associate Professor: J. S. Stewart; 
Adjunct Associate Professors: G. V. Candler, J. G. Cleland, A. C. Eberhardt, J. H. 
Hebrank, K. R. Iyer, D. W. Lee, R. M. Potter, Jr., H. Singh; Assistant Professors'. 
J. R. Edwards Jr., L. P. Franzoni, C. E. Hall Jr., K. M. Lyons, M. K. 
Ramasubramanian, W. L. Roberts IV, M. A. Zikry; Adjunct Assistant Professors: 
D. P. Colvin, J. A. Cooke, S. D. Holland, M. R. Jolly, M. A. Norris, M. T. Odman, 
D. J. Rossetti, Q. Shen, S. C. Southward, M. R. Spano, Sr., M. E. Tauber 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL ADJUNCT GRADUATE FACULTY 

V. S. Awa, S. Chandra, P. H. DeHoff 



159 



Course offerings and research programs are available in the following areas: thermo- 
dynamics and Clergy conversion, heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, combustion, 
acoustics and noise control, machine design, vibration, gas dynamics and aerodynamics, 
aeroelasticity, CFD, finite elements, structures, controls, precision engineering, 
materials processing and tribology. 

Admission Requirements: An appUcant to the master's program must be a graduate of 
an accredited undergraduate program with a B.S. degree in either mechanical or aero- 
space engineering. Graduates of other accredited programs in engineering, physical 
sciences and mathematics may be considered but will be required to make up 
uiKiergraduate deficiencies without graduate credit. Provisional admissions, as well as 
exceptions, are sometimes granted under special circumstances. The most qualified 
applicants are accqjted first. Apphcants to the Ph.D. program must have met the M.S. 
admission requirements, completed the M.S. degree in mechanical engineering or 
aerospace engineering and additionally must satisfy the Ph.D. qualifying requirements. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The non-thesis Master of Mechanical Engineering 
degree requires 27 hours of course credit and a six-hour project. 

Ph.D. Degree Requirements: A minimum of 24 hours of course credit beyond the 
master's program is required. 

Student Financial Support: Various types of assistantships and fellowships are avail- 
able. Awards are made to the most qualified apphcants first and generally are not 
available for all students. 

Other Relevant Information: Each new student choses an area of specialty, selects an 
advisor and committee, customizes a program of study and begins research in the first 
semester of residaice. The Director of Graduate Programs acts as a temporary advisor 
initially and should be contacted with questions. 

GRAnVATE rnURRER 

MAE 501 ADVANCED ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS. 

MAE 503 ADVANCED POWER PLANTS. 

MAE 504 FLUID DYNAMICS OF COMBUSTION I. 

MAE 505 HEAT TRANSFER THEORY AND APPLICATIONS. 

MAE 510 EFFECTS OF NOISE AND VIBRATION ON MAN. 

MAE 513 PRINCIPLES OF STRUCTURAL VIBRATION. 

MAE 514 NOISE AND VIBRATION CONTROL. 

MAE 517 INSTRUMENTATION IN SOUND AND VIBRATION ENGINEERING. 

MAE 518 ACOUSTIC RADIATION L 

MAE 519 THEORY OF NOISE IN TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS. 

MAE(IE) 520 INDUSTRIAL ROBOTICS. 

MAE 521 LINEAR CONTROL AND DESIGN FOR MINO SYSTEMS. 

MAE 522 REAL TIME DIGITAL FILTERING AND CONTROL 

160 



MAE 524 PRINCIPLES OF STRUCTURAL CONTROL. 

MAE 525 ADVANCED FLIGHT VEIUCLE STABILITY AND CONTROL. 

MAE 526 INERTIAL NAVIGATION ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 

MAE(MAT) 531 MATERIALS PROCESSING BY DEFORMATION. 

MAE<MAT) 532 FUNDAMENTALS OF METAL MACIUNING THEORY. 

MAE 533 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS L 

MAE 536 PHOTOELASTICITY. 

MAE 537 MECHANICS OF COMPOSITE STRUCTURES. 

MAE 538 ENGINEERING OPTICS. 

MAE 540 ADVANCED AIR CONDITIONING DESIGN. 

MAE 541 ADVANCED MACHINE DESIGN L 

MAE 542 MECHANICAL DESIGN FOR AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY. 

MAE 543 FRACTURE MECHANICS. 

MAE 544 REAL TIME ROBOTICS. 

MAE 545 METROLOGY FOR PRECISION MANUFACTURING. 

MAE 550 FOUNDATIONS OF FLUID DYNAMICS. 

MAE 551 AIRFOIL THEORY. 

MAE 552 TRANSONIC AERODYNAMICS. 

MAE 553 COMPRESSIBLE FLUID FLOW. 

MAE 554 HYPERSONIC AERODYNAMICS. 

MAE 555 AERODYNAMIC HEATING. 

MAE 556 MECHANICS OF IDEAL FLUIDS. 

MAE 557 DYNAMICS OF INTERNAL FLUID FLOW. 

MAE 558 PLASMAGASDYNAMICS L 

MAE 559 MOLECULAR GAS DYNAMICS L 

MAE 560 COMPUTATIONAL FLUID MECHANICS AND HEAT TRANSFER. 

MAE 561 WING THEORY. 

MAE 562 PHYSICAL GAS DYNAMICS. 

MAE<MEA) 563 GEOPHYSICAL FLUID MECHANICS. 

MAE(ECE) 565 GAS LASERS. 

MAE 570 THEORY OF PARTICULATE COLLECTION IN AIR POLLUTION CONTROL. 

MAE 586 PROJECT WORK IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

MAE 589 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

MAE 601 STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS. 

MAE 604 FLUID DYNAMICS OF COMBUSTION II. 

MAE 608 ADVANCED CONDUCTIVE HEAT TRANSFER. 

MAE 609 ADVANCED CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER. 

MAE 610 ADVANCED RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER. 

MAE 613 ANALYTICAL METHODS IN STRUCTURAL VIBRATION. 

MAE 614 COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN STRUCTURAL VIBRATION. 

MAE 615 NONLINEAR VIBRATIONS. 

MAE 618 ACOUSTIC RADIATION II. 

MAE 619 RANDOM VIBRATION. 

MAE 623 MECHANICS OF MACIHNERY. 

MAE 634 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS H. 

MAE 640 ADVANCED MACHINE DESIGN IL 

MAE 642 MECHANICAL DESIGN ANALYSIS. 

MAE 650 COMPUTATION OF REACTING FLOWS. 

MAE 653 HYDRODYNAMIC STABILITY AND TRANSITION. 

MAE 654 DYNAAflCS OF REAL FLUIDS L 

MAE 655 DYNAMICS OF REAL FLUIDS IL 

MAE 656 TURBULENCE. 

MAE 658 PLASMAGASDYNAMICS H. 

MAE 659 MOLECULAR GAS DYNAMICS II. 

MAE 660 COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS. 

MAE 661 INTRODUCTION TO ROCKET PROPULSION. 

MAE(MEA) 663 ADVANCED GEOPHYSICAL FLUID MECHANICS. 

161 



MAE(M£A) 664, 665 PERTURBATION METHOD IN FLUID MECHANICS I, II. 
MAE 686 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
MAE 695 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. 
MAE 699 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH. 

Microbiology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Life Sciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor H. M. Hassan, Head of the Department 

Professor T. Melton, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7615, (919) 515-2391, Fax: (919) 515-7867, micro@mbio.ncsu.edu 

Professors: W, J. Dobrogosz, G. H. Luginbuhl, J. M. Mackenzie Jr., L. W. Parks, 
J. J. Perry; Professor (USDA): P. E. Bishop; Adjunct Professors: R. E. Kanich, K. 
G. TatcheJl, S. R. Tove; Professor Emeritus: G. H. Elkan; Associate Professors: S. 
M. Laster, E. S. Miller; Adjunct Associate Professor: K. T. Kleeman; Assistant 
Professors: J. W. Brown, I. T. D. Petty; A^unct Assistant Professors: W. S. Dallas, 
S. H. Shore 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: P. M. Foegeding, F. J. Fuller, T. R. Klaenhammer, W. E. Kloos, P. E. 
Omdorff, J. C. H. Shih; Associate Professor: B, Sherry; Associate Professor (USDA): 
R. G. Upchurch 

The Departm^it of Microbiology is in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and 
has a unique bleiKl of apphed and basic research programs. The department offers 
courses of study and research leading to the Ph.D., M.S. and Master of Life Sciences 
degrees. The graduate program is designed to prepare individuals for careers in 
academic, industrial or research institute settings. Research in the department empha- 
sizes study of fuodam^ital biological processes, with several programs having important 
biotechnological, environmental and medical appUcations. 

Admission Requirements'. AppUcations are invited from individuals holding bacca- 
laureate or M.S. degrees in the physical and life sciences. AppUcations should ideaUy 
be received in the department before January 15 to be considered for faU admission. A 
written statement should describe the appUcant's academic and career goals as weU as 
their area of interest. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The M.S. is a research-oriented degree that requires 
30 credit hours and a written thesis. For students wishing a more general educational 



162 



background in microbiology without the thesis requirement, the Master of Life Sciences 
degree is offered. A first-year core curriculum is required for all master's degree 
students. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The Ph.D. program is designed for individuals desiring 
to pursue careers in research and teaching. Students enroll in a core curriculum 
consisting of courses in metaboUc regulation/physiology, virology, immunology and 
molecular genetics. In addition, the student, in consultation with and approval by his/her 
advisory committee, may select elective courses offered by the Department of Micro- 
biology and by other departments on campus. In conjunction with the advisor, the stu- 
dent estabUshes a four-member faculty advisory committee to guide the research and 
academic program. At least one semester of laboratory instructorship is required. The 
final examination also includes a seminar presented by the candidate that is open to the 
university community. 

Student Financial Support: Financial support for study in the department is available 
in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships and competitive fellow- 
ships. All appUcations to the departm^it are automatically considered for available assis- 
tantships. For highly qualified students, supplemental fiinds are frequently available. 

Other Relevant Ir\formation: During the first semester, participation in the laboratory 
rotation program is encouraged so that students become acquainted with departmental 
research programs, faculty and other graduate students. A faculty thesis advisor and 
laboratory research program are usually selected in the first semester and no later than 
the second term. 

GRAnVATE rniJRRES 

MB(BO,PP) 501 FUNGI AND THEIR INTERACTION WITH PLANTS. 

MB 503 MICROBIAL DIVERSITY. 

MB 514 MICROBIAL METABOLIC REGULATION. 

MB 518 INTRODUCTORY VIROLOGY. 

MB(PP) 519 BACTERIA AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH PLANTS. 

MB(FS) 525 FERMENTATION MICROBIOLOGY. 

MB(SSC) 532 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY. 

MB(IMM) 551 IMMUNOLOGY. 

MB(ZO)555 PROTOZOOLOGY. 

MB(IMM,PHY,PO,VMS) 556 IMMUNOGENETICS. 

MB(GN) 558 PROKARYOTIC MOLECULAR GENETICS. 

MB(BO)574 PHYCOLOGY. 

MB(BO,PP)575 THEFUNGL 

MB(BO,PP)576 THE FUNGI-LAB. 

MB 590 TOPICAL PROBLEMS. 

MB 592 LABORATORY RESEARCH METHODS. 

MB 593 TEACHING EXPERIENCE. 

MB 605 BIOLOGICAL SCANT>fING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY. 

MB 610 BIOLOGICAL TRANSMISSION ELECTRON NHCROSCOPY. 

MB 611 ULTRA\aCROTOMY FOR LIFE SCIENCES. 

MB(BO,GN,PP) 627 FUNGAL GENETICS AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

163 



MB(SSC) 632 ECOLOGY AND FUNCTIONS OF SOIL NflCROORGANISMS. 

MB(VMS) 653 ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY. 

MB(GN) 660 EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIAL GENETICS. 

MB 671 MOLECULAR VIROLOGY OF ANIMAL VIRUSES. 

MB 690 MICROBIOLOGY SEMINAR. 

MB 691 MICROBILOGY RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS. 

MB 692 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MICROBIOLOGY. 

MB 699 MICROBIOLOGY RESEARCH. 

Middle Grades Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see curriculum and instruc- 
tion. 

Natural Resources Administration 

Degrees O^ered: M.S., Master of Natural Resources Administration 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. L. Holley Jr., Director of Graduate Programs, Forestry 

Box 8002, (919) 515-2892 

Associate Professor!.. D. Gustke, Director of Graduate Programs, Parks, Recreation 

and Tourism Management 

Box 8004, (919)515-3276 

Professor CD. Raper, Director of Graduate Programs, Soil Science 

Box 7619, (919)515-2643 

Professors: F. W. Cubbage, H. A. Devine, H. J. Kleiss, J. D. Wellman; Associate 
Professors: R. C. Abt, J. D. Gregory, B. E. Wilson; Associate Professor (USDA): J. 
E. deSteiguer; Assistant Professor: R. L. Moore 

The natural resources administration program is an interdepartmental program designed 
to prepare students for administrative positions in both private and public natural 
resource organizations, A core curriculum of 15 credit hours provides all NRA students 
with courses in administration, economics, policy, statistics and current natural resource 
issues. For the remaining 17 credits, students elect a technical option administered by 
one of the three participating departments. A total of five technical options are currently 
approved. Two are in the Department of Forestry (forest jxiUcy and management, 
hydrology); two are in the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management 
(outdoor recreation, spatial information systems) and one is in the Department of Soil 
Science (soil science). With one exception, each option is available as either the M.S. 
in NRA or as the non-thesis Master of NRA. The Soil Science Option is available only 
as the non-thesis degree. 



164 



Admissons Requirements: Students should have an undergraduate degree in natural 
resources or a related field. Experience in natural resources management and adminis- 
tration will be considered in Ueu of an appropriate undergraduate degree. Admission is 
contingent upon acceptance by an advisor. 

Master's Requirements: The M.S. degree requires a research thesis based on 
con^jl^on of a research project. The Master of NRA degree requires a practical project 
which develops and demonstrates problem-solving skills. 

Core Co urses (15 credit hourx^ 

ECG 515 ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE POUCY. 

or 
EC(ARE) 436 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONO\nCS. 
FOR 672 CURRENT ISSUES IN NATURAL RESOURCE POUCY. 
PA 511 PUBUC ADNflNISTRATION. 
PA 520 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY. 
FOR 691 or PRT 696 at SSC 690 SEMINAR. 
One graduate statistics course 

Nuclear Engineering 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Nuclear Engineeriiig 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. J. Dudziak, Head of the Department 
Professor K. Verghese, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7909, (919) 515-2301, verghese@ncsu.edu 

Professors: R. P. Gardner, J. G. GiUigan, K. L. Murty, P. J. Turinsky; A^unct 
Professors: R. A. Gerwin, M. S. Wechsler; Professors Emeriti: R. L. Murray, R. F. 
Saxe, E. Stam, L. R. Zumwalt; Associate Professors: M. A. Bourham, J. M. Doster, 
C. W. Mayo; Adjunct Associate Professors: Y. R. Azmy; Assistant Professors: O. E. 
Hankins, R. M. Mayo, M. Yim; Adjunct Assistant Professors: D. J. Kropaczek 

The discipline of nuclear engineering is concerned with the development of nuclear 
processes for energy production and with the appUcations of radiation for the benefit of 
society. Representative topics of investigation include analytic, computational and exf>er- 
imental research in the neutronics, materials, thennal-hydrauUcs and control aspects of 
fission reactors; radiation detection and measurement of basic physics parameters; waste 
management and radiological assessment; applications of radioisotopes and radiation in 
industry, medicine and science; and plasma, plasma-material surface interactions and 
design aspects of fusion reactors. 



165 



Admission Requirements: Bachelor's degree graduates in any of the fields of engineer- 
ing or physical sciences may be qualified for successful advanced study in nuclear 
engineering. Prior experience or course work in nuclear physics, partial differential 
equations and basic reactor analysis is helpful but may be gained during the first semes- 
ter of graduate study. GRE scores (general test) are usually needed for financial aid. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A project is required for the MNE degree. A minor (9 
semester hours) must be selected for both the M.S. and MNE degrees. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Typically about 60 semester hours are required beyond 
the B.S. degree for the Ph.D. (includes research hours). Students must pass a depart- 
mental qualifying exam that covers basic nuclear engineering material. Students must 
select a minor (typically 15-18 hours). 

Student Financial Support: Teaching assistantships, research assistantships and fellow- 
ships are available for qualified appUcants. Opf>ortunities are also available for graduate 
traineeships with utihty companies, reactor manufacturers and national laboratories 
providing a valuable combination of financial support and learning in the classroom, the 
research laboratory and on the job. 

Other Relevant Ir\fonnation: The department has many excellent facihties including the 
one-megawatt PULSTAR fission reactor, the Scaled PWR Facihty (SPWRF), neutron 
activation analysis laboratory, nuclear materials laboratory, plasma and fusion 
laboratories, instrumentation and controls equipment, radiation analyzers and 
tomography systms, and computers ranging from workstations to a supercomputer. 

GRAniJATK rniJIRSES 

NE 504 RADIATION, SAFETY AND SHIELDING. 

NE505 REACTOR SYSTEMS. 

NES08 RADIATION SAFETY. 

NE(MAT) 509 NUCLEAR MATERIALS. 

NE(PY) 511 NUCLEAR PHYSICS FOR ENGINEERS. 

NE512 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES. 

NE 520 RADIATION AND REACTOR FUNDAMENTALS. 

NE521 NUCLEAR LABORATORY FUNDAMENTALS. 

NE522 REACTOR DYNAMICS AND CONTROL. 

NE523 REACTOR ANALYSIS. 

NE524 REACTOR HEAT TRANSFER. 

NE(MAT)525 NUCLEAR MATERIALS. 

NE 526 RADIOISOTOPE MEASUREMENT APPLICATIONS. 

NE 527 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING ANALYSIS. 

NE(PY) 528 IP^RODUCTION TO PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION ENERGY. 

NE 550 LABORATORY PROJECTS IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING. 

NE(MAT) 573 COMPUTER EXPERIMENTS IN MATERIALS AND NUCLEAR ENGINEERING. 

NE 580 PLASMA GENERATION AND DIAGNOSTICS LABORATORY. 

NE581 FUSION ENERGY ENGINEERING. 

NE 591, 592 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING I, II. 

NE601 REACTOR THEORY AND ANALYSIS. 

166 



NE(MA) 607 EXACT AND APPROXIMATE SOLUTIONS IN PARTICLE TRANSPORT THEO- 
RY. 
NE 610 NUCLEAR REACTOR DESIGN CALCULATIONS. 
NE611 RADIATION DETECTION. 

NE 612 THERMAL HYDRAULIC DESIGN CALCULATIONS. 
NE 620 NUCLEAR RADIATION ATTENUATION. 
NE 621 RADIATION EFFECTS ON MATERIALS. 
NE 631 REACTOR KINETICS AND CONTROL. 
NE 641 RADIOISOTOPE APPLICATIONS. 
NE680 PLASMA ENGINEERING L 
NE681 PLASMA ENGINEERING H. 

NE 691, 692 ADVANCED TOPICS IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING I, IL 
NE695 SEMINAR IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING. 
NE699 RESEARCH IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING. 

Nutrition 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor J. C. Allen, Coordinator 

Box 7624, (919) 515-2968 

Professors: L. S. Bull, G. L. Catignani, W. E. Donaldson, J. D. Garlich, W. M. 
Hagler Jr., R. W. Harvey, W, L. Johnson, E. E. Jones, C. J. Lackey, J. F. Ort, J. 
C. H. Shih, J. W. Spears, H. E. Swaisgood, L. W. Whitlow; Professors Emeriti: L. 
W. Aurand, E. R. Barrick, E. S. Cofer, C. H. Hill, J. R. Jones, R. D. Mochrie, A. 
H. Rakes, H. A. Ramsey, F. H. Smith, G. H. Wise; Associate Professors: B. P. 
Alston-Mills, K. E. Anderson, L. C. Boyd, J. H. Eisemann, J. L. Grimes, P. R. 
Ferket, J. W. McClelland, J. Odle, R. C. Smart; Visiting Associate Professor: G. G. 
Gomez; Assistant Professors: A. Eraser, B. A. Hopkins, M. H. Poore, M. R. 
Wilhams; Visiting Assistant Professor: S. L. Ash 

The interdepartmental nutrition program consist of faculty from five departments (animal 
science, family and consumer sciences, food science, poultry science and toxicology). 
Studaits reside and conduct research in one of these departments imder the direction of 
an appropriate advisor. Research in the nutrition program may be conducted with a 
variety of species and at levels ranging from the molecular to the whole animal. 
Research programs are primarily in the area of nutritional biochemistry or experimental 
animal nutrition. 

Admission Requirement: To be considered for admission, a student should have a B.S. 
or M.S degree in a science-related area. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A minimum of 24 course credit hours is required. 

167 



Doctoral Degree Requirements: A minimum of 18 course credit hours is required. 

Student Financial Support: Assistantships and fellowships are available on a competi- 
tive basis from the departments in which the advisor resides. 

nRADUATF rnURSFS 

NTR(ANS) 516A,B,C,D ANIMAL NUTRITION RESEARCH METHODS. 

NTR(FS) 530 HUMAN NUTRITION. 

NTR 590 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN NUTRITION. 

NTR 601 PROTEIN AND AMINO ACID METABOUSM. 

NTR(ANS,PO) 605 MINERAL METABOUSM. 

NTR(FS) 606 VITAMIN METABOUSM. 

NTR 608 ENERGY METABOLISM. 

NTR(ANS,PHY,VMS) 632 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM. 

NTR 690 ADVANCED SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN NUTRITION. 

NTR 699 RESEARCH IN NUTRITION. 



Occupational Education 



For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see mathematics and science 
education. 

Operations Research 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Operations Research 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. E. Ehnaghraby, Chair and Program Director 

Box 7913, (919) 515-2350, Fax: (919) 515-5281, ehnaghra@eos.ncsu.edu 

Professors: B. B. Bhattachaiyya, J, W. Bishir, J. C. Diinn, S. Fang, R. E. Hartwig, 
T. J. Hodgson, D. M. Holdiausen Jr., C. T. Kelley, C. D. Meyer Jr., A. A. J. 
Nilsson, H. L. Nuttle, H. G. Perros, E. L. Peterson, S. D. Roberts, CD. Savage, 
W. J. Stewart, M. W. Suh, J. R. Wilson; Professor Emeritus: H. J. Gold; Associate 
Professors: Y. Fathi, T. L. Honeycutt, R. E. King, T. W. Reiland, J. Rodriguez, J. 
P. Roise, C. E. Smith, M. F. M. StaUmann, H. T. Iran, I. Viniotis; Adjunct 
Associate Professor: H. J. Uyttenhove; Assistant Professor: H. Damerdji 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Professor: G. W. Dickson 



168 



Operations research is a graduate program of an interdisciplinary nature, governed by 
an administrative board and the program committee, and administered through the office 
of the program director. 

Admission Requirements: Apphcations for a master's degree program are acceprted 
normally firom undergraduate majors in mathematical sciences and engineering. Apphca- 
tions for the doctoral degree program are accepted normally from holders of a master's 
degree from a recognized program (preferably an OR program or one of its aUied fields) 
who show promise of success at the Ph.D. level, as indicated by previous academic 
j)erformance and independent research. 

A score on the GRE that is less than two years old is required if financial assistance is 
sought or if the student is transferring from another doctoral program. 

Master's Degree Requirements'. The Master of Operations Research degree is a termin- 
al graduate degree for students who seek careers as OR practitioners in either the private 
or pubUc sector. The M.S. degree is designed to prepare students for careers in research 
and development. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The Ph.D. degree is intended for students to be re- 
search sciaitists in industry or teachers and researchers in academia. Please consult the 
OR brochure for more details of degree requirements. 

Student Financial Support: Both teaching and research assistantships are available to 
qualified appUcants. Outstanding students who are U.S. citizens and who shall be 
airolled in the NC State Graduate School for the first time are ehgible for the Engineer- 
ing Dean's Graduate Fellowship Program. 

CENTRAL nRADUATF mURSFS 

OR 501 INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS RESEARCH. 

OR 502 INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS THEORY, 

OR(MA) 504 INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING. 

OR(IE,MA) 505 LIN'EAR PROGRAMMING. 

OR 506 ALGORITIEVHC METHODS IN NONUNEAR PROGRAMAflNG. 

OR(IE) 509 DYNA\nC PROGRAM\flNG. 

OR 520 THEORY OF ACTIVITY N'ETWORKS. 

OR(CHE) 527 OPTIMIZATION OF ENGINEERING PROCESSES. 

OR(E,MA) 531 DYNAAHC SYSTEMS ANT) MULTIVARIABLE CONTROL L 

OR(IE) 561 QUEUES AND STOCHASTIC SERVICE SYSTEMS. 

OR(CSCJECE,IE) 562 COMPUTER SIMULATION TECHNIQUES. 

OR(BMA,ST) 575 DECISION ANALYTIC MODEUNG. 

OR(CSC,MA) 585 GRAPH THEORY. 

OR(IE,MA)586 N'ETWORK FLOWS. 

OR 591 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH. 

OR 592 PRACTICLTVl IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH. 

OR 605 LARGE SCALE LINTAR PROGRAMNflNG SYSTEMS. 

OR(MA,ST) 606 NONXIN'EAR PROGRAMMING. 

169 



OR 609 ADVANCED DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING. 

OR (BMA,MA,ST) 610 STOCHASTIC MODELING. 

OR(BMA) 611 SYSTEM MODELING THEORY. 

OR(IE) 612 ADVANCED SCHEDULING AND ROUTING. 

OR(MA)614 INTEGER PROGRAMMING. 

OR(MA) 629 VECTOR SPACE METHODS IN SYSTEM OPTIMIZATION. 

OR(E,MA) 631 DYNAMIC SYSTEMS AND MULTIVARIABLE CONTROL II. 

OR(IE) 662 STOCHASTIC SIMULATION DESIGN AND ANALYSIS. 

OR 691 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH. 

OR(IE,MA) 692 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING. 

OR 695 SEMINAR IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH. 

OR 699 PROJECT IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH. 

^TinnF^TFn roGNATK rnuRSFS 

Cognate courses are courses that are oftai included in OR programs of study, but which 
carry other dqjartm^ital designations. They cover subject matter closely related to OR, 
and provide additional insight into the theory or appUcation of OR methodology. 
Students may include cognate courses in their programs of study with the consent of 
their faculty advisor. 

BMA(MA,ST) 571, 572 BIOMATHEMATICS I & II. 

CHE 525 CHEMICAL PROCESS CONTROL. 

CE 575 CIVIL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS. 

CSC 505 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS. 

CSC(MA) 529, 530 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I & II. 

CSC(ECE) 671 ADVANCED COMPUTER PERFORMANCE MODELUNG. 

ECG(BUS) 650 ECONOMIC DECISION THEORY. 

ECG(ST)651 ECONOMETRICS. 

ECG(ST) 652 TOPICS IN ECONOMETRICS. 

ECE 516 FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS. 

ECE 521 DIGITAL COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN. 

ECE 691 SPECIAL STUDIES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

IE 523 PRODUCTION PLANNING, SCHEDUUNG AND INVENTORY CONTROL. 

IE 547 RELIABIUTY ENGINEERING. 

IE 548 QUALITY ENGINEERING. 

IE 611 THE DESIGN OF PRODUCTION SYSTEMS. 

MA(ST) 541 THEORY OF PROBABILITY. 

MA(ST) 542 INTRODUCTION TO STOCHASTIC PROCESSES. 

MA(ST) 617, 618 MEASURE THEORY AND ADVANCED PROBABIUTY. 

MA 622 LINEAR TRANSFORMATIONS AND MATRIX THEORY. 

MA 623 THEORY OF MATRICES AND APPLICATIONS. 

MA 647 FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS L 

MA 685 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. 

ST 518 APPLIED TIME SERIES ANALYSIS. 

ST 583 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL DECISION THEORY. 

ST 613, 614 TIME SERIES ANALYSIS I & II. 



170 



Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management 

Degrees OlTered: M.S., Master of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, 
Master of Natural Resources Administration 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. S. Rea, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor L. D. Gustke, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8004, (919) 515-3276, gustke<8>cfr.cfr.ncsu.edu 

Professors: H. A. Devine, A. Lumpkin, C. D. Siderelis, M. R. Warren Jr., J. D. 
Wellman; Professors Emeriti: T. I. Hines, W. E. Smith, R. E. Stemioff; Associate 
Professors: S. L. Kirsch, C. S. Love, B. E. Wilson; Acijunct Associate Professor: H. 
K. Cordell; Associate Professors Emeriti: G. A. Hammon, L. L. Miller; Assistant 
Professors: G. L. Brothers, R. L. Moore 

The master's degree provides students the opportunity to develop and enhance their 
critical understanding of both the conceptual foundations of parks, recreation and 
tourism management and the procedures of systematic inquiry and critical problem 
solving as appUed to plaiming and management issues. The department offers edu- 
cational opportunities and resources for the preparation of professionals concerned with 
planning, organizing, managing and directing parks, recreation and tourism programs, 
areas and facilities. The general emphasis areas at the master's level include: parks and 
recreation management, tourism development and management, geographic information 
systems, recreational sport management and natural resource recreation management. 

Admissions Requirements: Scores from the ORE or from a comparable substitute 
examination are required for admission. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The M.S. degree requires 30 hours of course work, of 
which 4 hours is a master's thesis. The M.PRT. requires a minimum of 36 hours of 
course work, of which 2 hours is a master's research project. For both degrees, the 
required core courses are limited to 1 1 hours for a student with a background in recrea- 
tion and 17 for a student without such a background. A minor is optional with both 
degrees. The departmait offers a co-major with pubhc administration which includes 39 
hours of course work. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate assistantships and internships are available to 
students in this program on a competitive basis. 



171 



rrRAnriATF rnuRSEfi 

PRT 500 THEORIES OF LEISURE AND RECREATION. 

PRT 501 RESEARCH METHODS IN RECREATION. 

PRT (EBG) 503 ECONOMICS OF RECREATION. 

PRT 504 RECREATION AND PARK DATA SYSTEMS. 

PRT 505 QUANTITATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR RECREATION AND NATURAL RESOURCE 
MANAGEMENT. 

PRT 510 THEORIES OF SPORT AND FITNESS PROGRAM MANAGEMENT. 

PRT 511 FOUNDATIONS FOR SPORT, EXERCISE AND FITNESS PROGRAM MANAGE- 
MENT. 

PRT 512 RECREATIONAL SPORT MANAGEMENT. 

PRT 520 CONCEPTS OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM. 

PRT 562 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 

PRT 563 TECHNICAL ISSUES IN GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 

PRT 580 CURRENT ISSUES IN RECREATION RESOURCES. 

PRT 591 RECREATION RESOURCES PROBLEMS. 

PRT 595 SPECIAL TOPICS IN RECREATION RESOURCES. 

PRT 663 APPLICATION ISSUES IN GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 

PRT 664 ADVANCED STUDY IN GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 

PRT 675 FIELD STUDIES IN RECREATION. 

PRT 690 RECREATION MANAGEMENT SEMINAR I. 

PRT 691 RECREATION MANAGEMENT SEMINAR II. 

PRT 692 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN RECREATION. 

PRT 696 SEMINAR IN RECREATION RESEARCH. 

PRT 699 RESEARCH IN RECREATION. 

Physics 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. R. Gould, Head of the Department 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor G. E. Mitchell, Director of Graduate 

Programs 

Box 8202, (919) 515-8706, gary_mitcheU@ncsu.edu 

University Professor: G. Lucovsky 

Professors: D. E. Aspnes, J. Bemholc, K. T. Chung, J. W. Cook Jr., S. R. Cotanch, 
R. E. Fornes, D. G. Haase, C, E. Johnson, K. L. Johnston, G. H. Katzin, F. Lado 
Jr., J. D. Memory, J. R. Mowat, R. J. Nemanich, M. A. Paesler, J. Y. Park, R. 
R. Patty, S. P. Reynolds, J. S. Risley, D. E. Sayers, J. F. Schetzina, P. J. Stiles, 
D. R. Tilley; Adjunct Professors R. V. Janssens; Professors Emeriti: W. R. Davis, 
W. O. Doggett, G. L. Hall, A. W. Jenkins Jr., E. R. Manring, A. C. Menius Jr., L. 
W. Seagondollar; Associate Professors: G. C. Cobb, Jr., D. C, EUison, C. Ji, M. 
A. Klenin, G. W, Parker HI; Adjunct Associate Professors: J. F. ShrinerJr.; 



172 



Assistant Prof essors: H. Ade, R. Beichner, J. M. Blondin, J. D. Brown, H. Hallen, 
E. F. Moore, C. M. Roland, E. S. Swanson; Adjunct Assistant Professor: L. S. 
Piano 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: J. M. Danby, R. M. Kolbas, J. Narayan, D. L. Ridgeway, E. C. Theil; 
Associate Professor: L. K. Norris 

Research opportunities are available in the following areas: astrophysics, atomic and 
molecular physics, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics and physics education. 

Admission Requirements: Bachelor's degree in Physics (or the equivalent) and the GRE 
Advanced test in physics. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Six semesters beyond the baccalaurate; core physics 
courses PY 521, 581, 582, 583, 585, 586. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate teaching assistantships are available for new and 
continuing students; research assistantships are normally available only to continuing 
students. 

GRAnUATF rnuRSFS 

PY 506 NUCLEAR AND SUBATOMIC PHYSICS. 

PY 507 ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS. 

PY508 ION AND ELECTRON PHYSICS. 

PY509 PLASMA PHYSICS. 

PY(NE) 511 NUCLEAR PHYSICS FOR ENGINEERS. 

PY516 PHYSICAL OPTICS. 

PY 517 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS. 

PY 521 STATISTICAL PHYSICS I. 

PY 525 COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS. 

PY 531 ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS. 

PY543 ASTROPHYSICS. 

PY(ECE) 552 INTRODUCTION TO THE STRUCTURE OF SOLIDS, 

PY 553 INTRODUCTION TO THE STRUCTURE OF SOLIDS II. 

PY 554 PROPERTIES OF SURFACES AND INTERFACES. 

PY(MA) 555 MATHEMATICAL INTRODUCTION TO CELESTIAL MECHANICS. 

PY(MA)556 ORBITAL MECHANICS. 

PY 561 ELECTRONICS FOR PHYSICISTS. 

PY 581, 582 QUANTUM MECHANICS I, II. 

PY 583 ADVANCED CLASSICAL MECHANICS I. 

PY 585, 586 ADVANCED ELECTRICITY AND NL\GNETISM I, II. 

PY 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS. 

PY 611 ADVANCED QUANTUM MECHANICS I. 

PY 612 ADVANCED QUANTUM MECHANICS II. 

PY 622 STATISTICAL PHYSICS II. 

PY (ECE) 627 SEMICONDUCTOR TIDN FILMS TECHNOLOGY. 

PY 630 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE PHYSICS I. 

173 



PY 690 ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS. 
PY695 SE\nNAR. 
PY 699 RESEARCH. 

Physiology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Life Sciences 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor M. A. Qureshi, Coordinator 

Box 7621, (919) 515-4011 

Professors: R. A. Argaizio, G. T. Barthalmus, J. T. Brake, J. H. Britt, E. V. Caruolo, 
V. L. Christensai, W, J. Croom, F. W. Edens, K. L. Esbenshade, H. F. Heatwole, T. 
E. LeVere, N. C. Okon, W. D. Oxender, R. M. Fetters, J. F. Roberts, M. C. Roberts, 
T. D. Slopes, C. E. Stevens, C. Teng, H. A. Underwood Jr., T. G. Wolcott; 
Professors Emeriti: L. Goode, C. H. Hill, D. E. Smith, L. C. Ulberg; Associate 
Professors: G. W. Almond, B. Alston-Mills, J. D. Armstrong, H. M. Berschneider, B. 
L. Black, B. A. Breuhaus, W. L. Flowers, J. E. Gadsby, R. M. Grossfeld, S. L. 
Pardue, J. N. Petitte, R. M. Roe, C. V. Sullivan, S. P. Washburn, M. D. Whitacre; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: M. S. Hand; Assistant Professors: C. E. Farin, S. L. 
Vivrette 

The physiology faculty is an interdepartmental group drawn from the departments 
participating in the program. These departments include animal science, biochemistry, 
CTitomology, food animal and equine medicine, poultry science, psychology, veterinary 
anatomy, piiysiological sciences and radiology, and zoology. The program emphasizes 
the comparative approach impUcit in this type of organization and is designed to prepare 
individuals for careers in research and teaching. Experimental animals available cover 
a wide range, from insects and other invertebrates to large mammals. 

Admission Requirements: Students entering the graduate program in physiology should 
have a bachelor's degree in a related biological or physical science. Undergraduate 
courses should include physiology, biochemistry, organic chemistry, calculus and 
physics. The Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination is required, and the 
Advanced Tests in biology and chemistry are desirable. 

Master's Degree Requirements: On average, the M.S. degree requires two to three 
years. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: On average, completion of the Ph.D. degree requires 
five years. 



174 



Student Financial Support. Financial assistance for qualified students in the fonn of re- 
search assistantships, fellowships and traineeships is available through participating 
departments. 

Other Relevant Iriformation: The Physiology Program is jointly administered by the 
Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Veterinary Medicine. Graduate students 
enrolled as physiology majors are located in the department of their major professor and 
may participate in departmental activities. 

GRAniJATE rniJRSKS 

PHY(ANS) 502 REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF MAMMALS. 

PHY(ZO)503 GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY L 

PHY(ZO)504 GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY H. 

PHY(ZO) 513 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. 

PHY(PO,ZO) 524 COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY. 

PHY(IMM,MB,PO,VMS) 556 IMMUNOGENETICS. 

PHY(ANS) 580 MAMMALIAN ENDOCRINOLOGY. 

PHY 590 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSIOLOGY. 

PHY(ZO) 595 SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION. 

PHY(ANS,NTR) 632 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM. 

PHY 690 PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR. 

PHY 695 SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSIOLOGY. 

PHY 699 PHYSIOLOGICAL RESEARCH. 

OTHER SUPPORTING COURSES AVAILABLE 

Other supporting course are available in biochemistry, biomathematics, biotechnology, 
cell biology, entomology, genetics, immun ology, microbiology, nutrition, pharma- 
cology, poultiy science, psychology, statistics, toxicology, veterinary medical sciences 
and zoology. Certain courses on the interface between physiology and engineering may 
be taken after consultation with advisor and the instructors concerned. 

Plant Pathology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Agriculture, Master of Life Sciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor O. W. Bamett Jr., Head of the Department 

(919) 515-2730 

Professor D. M. Benson, Director of Graduate Programs 

(919) 515-3966, Box 7616, Fax: (919) 515-5657, mike_benson@ncsu.edu 

Philip Morris Professor: T. A. Melton HI 



175 



Professors: J. E. Bailey, K. R. Barker, D. F. Bateman, M. K. Beute, R. I. Bruck, 
C. L. Campbell, M. E. Daub, L. F. Grand, J. Huang, R. K. Jones, S. A. Lommel, 
L. T. Lucas, C. E. Main, R. D. Milholland, G. A. Payne, D. F. Ritchie, R. C. 
Rufty, H. D. Shew, P. B. Shoemaker, T. B. Sutton, C. G. Van Dyke; Professors 
(USDA): A. S. Heagle, R. A. Reinert; Visiting Professor: C. S. Hodges Jr.; Professors 
Emeriti: J. L. Apple, C. W. Averre IE, J. R. Aycock, C. N. Clayton, C. B. Davey, H. 
E. Duncan, G. V. Gooding Jr., T. T. Hebert, G. B. Lucas, N. T. Powell, J. P. Ross, 
J. N. Sasser, H. W. Spurr Jr., D. L. Strider, H. H. Triantaphyllou, J. C. Wells, N. 
N. Winstead; Associate Professors: B. C. Haning, P. B. Lindgren, C. H. Opperman, 
J. B. Ristaino; Associate Professors (USDA): S. Leath, S. R. Shafer, R. G. Upchurch; 
Assistant Professors: M. Cubeta, E. L. Davis 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: E. B. Cowling, W. M. Hagler Jr;. Associate Professor: M. A. Conkling; 
Assistant Professor: C. L. Hemenway 

Plant pathology has a major commitment to solving plant disease problems with re- 
search that focuses on plant -pathogen interactions at the genomic, cellular, organismal 
and ecological levels. Approaches include disease management, epidemiology, molec- 
ular biology and host-parasite interactions. Focus areas are bacteriology, mycology, 
nematology, virology, soil-borne pathogens and mechanisms of pathogenesis. 

Admission Requirements: The general appUcation procedures of the Graduate School 
noted at the beginning of this section are followed. Normally domestic, but not 
international, apphcants are required to submit GRE results. A detailed statement of 
applicant interests and goals in plant pathology is most useful to the admissions 
committee. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Required courses include: PP 501 Fungi and Their 
Interaction with Plants, PP 502 Plant Disease: Methods and Diagnosis, PP 515 Epi- 
demiology and Plant Disease Control, PP 519 Bacteria and Their Interactions with 
Plants, PP 520 Plant Nematology and PP 521 Introductory Plant Viology. In addition, 
students take PP 690 Seminar and one advanced course. Students serve as a teaching 
assistant for one course. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: A diagnostic examination prior to enrollment is used 
as a guide to course selection and to measure competency in the M.S. courses Usted 
above. In addition, studaits take PP 650 Colloquium, PP 690 Seminar and two advanced 
courses. Students serve as a teaching assistant for two courses. 

Student Financial Support: A limited number of one-half time assistantships are avail- 
able on a competitive basis. Stipend levels for each degree are equivalent to those at 
conqxarable institutions. Out-of-state tuition waiver is normally granted for the first year. 

176 



Applicants are considered for assistantship support at time of application. Special sup- 
plem^its to assistantships are available on a competitive basis for outstanding students. 

Other Relevant Iriformation: Fully equipped and staffed laboratories for research are 
available in addition to greenhouse facilities and environmental growth chambers in the 
jAiytotron. Special facilities for experimental work on diseases under field conditions are 
available at 16 locations throughout the state. Microcomputers, hbrary, mycological 
herbarium, photography laboratory and interdepartmental electron microscopy center 
are additional features available in the department. 

FOR GRAnUATFS AlWD AnVANCED IJNBERnRAnJJATE^ 

PP 501 FUNGI AND THEIR INTERACTION WITH PLANTS. 

PP(CS,HS) 502 PLANT DISEASE: METHODS AND DIAGNOSIS. 

PP 504 PLANT DISEASE: PRINCIPLES, DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT. 

PP 515 EPIDEMIOLOGY AIVD PLANT DISEASE CONTROL. 

PP(MB) 519 BACTERIA AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH PLANTS. 

PP520 PLANT NEMATOLOGY. 

PP 521 INTRODUCTORY PLANT VIROLOGY. 

PP 522 PHYTOPATHOLOGY H-EPIDEMIOLOGY. 

PP(MB,BO)575 THEFUNGL 

PP(MB,BO)S76 THE FUNGI-LAB. 

PP 595 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

PP 604 MORPHOLOGY AIVD TAXONOMY OF NEMATODES. 

PP 605 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF PLANT VIRUSES. 

PP 608 HISTORY OF PHYTOPATHOLOGY. 

PP 611 ADVANCED PLANT NEMATOLOGY, 

PP612 PLANT PATHOGENESIS. 

PP 615 BOTANICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY. 

PP(CS,GN,HS) 618 BREEDING FOR PEST RESISTANCE. 

PP(BO)625 ADVANCED MYCOLOGY. 

PP (BO, GN, MB) 627 FUNGAL GENETICS AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

PP 628 SOILBORNE PLANT PATHOGENS. 

PP 649 GENETICS OF HOST-PARASITE INTERACTIONS. 

PP 650 COLLOQUIUM IN PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

PP 690 SEMINAR IN PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

PP699 RESEARCH IN PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

Political Science 

Degree Offered: M. A. 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor H. G. Kebschull, Director of Graduate Program 

Box 8102, (919) 515-5072, kebschuU@social.chass.ncsu.edu 

Professors: C. K. Coe, G. D. Garson, M. S. Soroos, D. W. Stewart, J. H. Svara, 
J. O. William; Professors Emeriti: W, J. Block, A. Holtzman, E. R. Rubin; Associate 



111 



Professors: D. M. Daley, R. H. Dorff, J. H. Gilbert, S. H. Kessler, J. M. McClain, 
R. S. Moog, E. O'Sullivan, T. V. Reid, J. E. Swiss, M. L. Vasu; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: K. S. Petersen; Assistant Professors: C. E. Griffin, R. L. 
Korosec, A. J. Taylor; Visiting Assistant Professors: J. K. Davis, S. K. Straus 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Associate Professor: P. W. Hamlett 

The program is designed for students interested in careers in government service, inter- 
national organizations, education or the private business sector. A typical course of 
study draws from the fields of pohtical science, history, sociology and anthropology, 
and economics. 

Admission Requirements: AppUcants should submit GRE scores and a writing sample; 
those iK)t meeting the minimum requirements for full admission should consult with the 
Director of Graduate Programs. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Two options are offered. The thesis option requires a 
minimum 30 hours of course work, including a thesis. The non-thesis option requires 
a minimum of 36 hours of course work. In either option, students choose two major 
fields from American poUtics, comparative pohtics, international relations and pubhc 
administration. Also required: a core course on pohtical science, a research methodol- 
ogy course, reading proficiency in a modem foreign language or competence in a re- 
search skill, and nine to twelve hours of work outside the department. 

Student Financial Support: A limited number of fellowships are awarded on a competi- 
tive basis. 

Other Relevant Iitformation: The methodology requirement should be fulfilled as soon 
as possible. Students may take courses at Duke or UNC-Chapel Hill on topics not 
offered by NCSU. 

nRADIIATF rniiRSFS 

PS 502 THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS. 

PS 506 UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 

PS 507 CIVIL LIBERTIES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

PS 531 INTERNATIONAL LAW. 

PS 533 GLOBAL PROBLEMS AND POLICY. 

PS 536 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND POLICY. 

PS 539 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PS 541 MILITARY COUPS AND REGIMES IN THE TIHRD WORLD. 

PS 542 WESTERN EUROPEAN POLITICS. 

PS 543 LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN POLITICS. 

PS 544 ISSUES IN SOVIET POLITICS. 

PS 545 COMPARATIVE SYSTEMS OF LAW AND JUSTICE. 

178 



PS 571 RESEARCH METHODS AND ANALYSIS. 
PS 590 READINGS AND RESEARCH. 
PS 598 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 
PS 631 SEAONAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. 
PS 641 SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS. 
PS 691 INTERNSmP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 
PS 696 SEMINAR IN POLITICS. 
PS 699 RESEARCH IN POUTICS. 

Poultry Science 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Master of Life Sciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. B. Havenstein, Head of the Department 
(919) 515-5555 

Professor T. D. Slopes, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7608, (919) 515-5535, tom@poultry.poulsci.ncsu.edu 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: W. E. Donaldson 

Professors: J. T. Brake, T. A. Carter, V. L. Christensen, F. W. Edens, J, D. 
Garlich, W. M. Hagler Jr., F. T. Jones, J. F. Ort, C. R. Parkhurst, M. A. 
Qureshi, J. C. H. Shih, M. J. Wineland; Adjunct Professors: M. R. Bakst, W. L. 
Bryden, R. R. Dietert, K. K. Krueger; Professors Emeriti: R. E. Cook, E. W. 
Glazener, P. B. Hamilton, J. R. Harris, C. H. Hill; Associate Professors: K. E. 
Anderson, G. S. Davis, P. R. Ferket, S. L. Pardue, J. N. Petitte; Adjunct Associate 
Professor. W. E. Brown; Assistant Professors: J. L. Grimes, C. M. Williams; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: R. P. Gildersleeve 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: R. W. Bottcher, W. J. Croom Jr.; Professor (USDA): B. W. Sheldon; 
Associate Professor Emeritus: H. R. Ball Jr.; Associate Professors: P. A. Curtis, D. 
P. Wages 

Course offerings and research programs are comprehensive in the areas of physiology, 
nutrition, microbiology, molecular biology, immunology, genetics, pathology and 
toxicology. The demand for men and women with advanced training in pxjultry science 
is far greater than the supply. Opportunities exist for graduates in research and teaching 
in universities, government and private industry. 

Admission Requirements: Exceptions to the minimum 3.00 undergraduate grade point 
average may be made for students with special backgrounds, abihties and interests. 



179 



Master's Degree Requirements: While there are no specific course requirements for the 
master's degree in poultry sciaice, most programs exceed the minimum 30 credit hours. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Doctoral degrees are offered only through interdepart- 
mental programs in the disciplines of physiology, nutrition, genetics, toxicology, micro- 
biology and immunology. Associated research is done with domestic birds in the Depart- 
m^it of Poultry Sciaice. Requiran^its are as given in the Graduate Catalogue. Apphca- 
tion should be made directly to the specific program. 

Student Financial Support. Both research and teaching assistantships are available on 
a competitive basis within the department. General requirements for these assistantships 
are as described in the Graduate Catalogue. Other financial support may be available in 
the form of graduate stipend supplementation, out-of-state tuition waivers or research 
grant support. 

Other Relevant Irtformation: The Department of Poultry Science occupies new facihties 
in a three-story building adjacent to the main campus hbrary. The department consists 
of about 25 faculty, a support staff of approximately 50, 20 to 30 graduate students and 
postdoctoral associates, and 50-100 undergraduate students. 

nRAniJATK rOTlR^ES 

PO 505 PHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF POULTRY MANAGEMENT. 

PO(PHY,ZO) 524 COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY.. 

PO(IMM,MB,PHY,VMS) 556 IMMUNOGENETICS. 

PO(IMM)557 AVIAN IMMUNOLOGY. 

PO 590 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN POULTRY SCIENCE. 

PO(ANS,NTR) 605 MINERAL METABOLISM. 

PO 698 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN POULTRY SCIENCE. 

P0 699 POULTRY RESEARCH. 

Psychology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. W. Martin, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor S. S. Snyder Jr., Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7801, (919) 515-2251, sam_snyder@ncsu.edu 

Professors: J. W. Cunningham, D. W. Drewes, T. M. Hess, J. W. Kalat, T. E. 
LeVere, D. H. Mershon, J. J. Michael, S. E. Newman, F. J. Smith, B. W. Westbrook; 
Adjunct Professors: J. L. Howard, L. G. Tomatzky, W. W. Tomow; Professors 
Emeriti: K. L. Barkley, J. C. Johnson, H. G. Miller, P. W. Thayer; Associate 

180 



Professors: L. E. Baker-Ward, S. Converse, W. P. Erchul, D. O. Gray, A. G. 
Halberstadt, P. F. Horan, K. W. Klein, J. E. R. Luginbuhl, R. W. Nacoste, S. B. 
Pond in, A. C. Schulte, M. A. Wilson, M. S. Wogalter; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: B. B. Burrus, B. F. Corder, A. D. Hall Associate Professors Emeriti: J. 
L. Cole, M. H. Pitts, R. F. Rawls; Assistant Professors: C. C. Brookins, M. E. 
Haskett; Clinical Assistant Professors: M. Y. Bingham, P. W. CoUins; Ac^unct 
Assistant Professors: B. H. Beith, J. W. Fleenor, C. L. Kronberg, C. E. Lorenz, B. 
H. Rogers 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: C. D. Korte, R. G. Pearson, J. L. Wasik 

The Department of Psychology offers seven courses of study leading to the Ph.D.: 
developmental psychology, ergonomics (human factors), experimental psychology, 
human resource development, industrial/organizational and vocational psychology, 
school psychology and social psychology. 

Admission Requirements: AppUcants should have satisfactory grades in all under- 
graduate work and at least a "B" average in undergraduate psychology courses, satis- 
factory scores on the GRE including the Advanced Test in psychology and three satis- 
factory letters of recommendation. Match of applicants' research interests with current 
faculty research is also considered. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Specific course requirements can be found in the De- 
partment of Psychology Graduate Handbook. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The graduate program for each doctoral student is 
determined in conjunction with the student's graduate advisory committee and tailored 
to the needs, interests, and accompUshments of the individual. Typically, students can 
expect to take 30 or more hours of credit beyond the master's degree. 

Student Financial Support: Many graduate students receive financial support in the 
form of teaching or research assistantships or fellowships. Apphcants should request 
such support whai they apply to the program. Often students supported by assistantships 
are allowed to pay tuition at the in-state rate, irrespective of residence. 

Other Relevant Information: The M.S. degree is available as part of work toward the 
doctorate, but students wishing to obtain a terminal M.S. are advised to consider other 
programs. 



181 



PSY500 VISUAL PERCEPTION. 

PSY 501 INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 502 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 504 ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 505 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 508 PSYCHOLOGY AND THE AFRICAN EXPERIENCE. 

PSY 509 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF ECOLOGICAL/COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 510 LEARNING AND MOTIVATION. 

PSY 511 ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 512 ACTION RESEARCH IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 513 PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW. 

PSY 520 COGNITIVE PROCESSES. 

PSY(PHI) 525 INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE SCIENCE. 

PSY 533 BIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR. 

PSY 535 TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. 

PSY(IE) 540 HUMAN FACTORS IN SYSTEMS DESIGN. 

PSY 543 ERGONOMIC PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT. 

PSY(IE)S45 HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

PSY 546 HUMAN INFORMATION PROCESSING. 

PSY 560 PERSONNEL SELECTION RESEARCH. 

PSY 561 TRAINING RESEARCH. 

PSY 562 HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING. 

PSY 563 CONSUMER RESEARCH. 

PSY 565 ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 566 ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE. 

PSY 567 INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY: A SOCIO-TECHNICAL PERSPECTIVE. 

PSY 571 INDFVIDUAL INTELLIGENCE MEASUREMENT. 

PSY 572 PSYCHOLOGICAL SURVEY OPERATIONS. 

PSY 573 THEORIES OF INTELLIGENCE. 

PSY 576 ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 577 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT. 

PSY 580 PSYCHOLOGICAL CONSULTATION. 

PSY 585 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 591 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY(IE) 593 AREA SEMINAR IN ERGONOMICS. 

PSY 594 AREA SEMINAR IN HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT. 

PSY 595 AREA SEMINAR IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 599 RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 600 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN PERCEPTION. 

PSY 611 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY: SMALL GROUPS RESEARCH. 

PSY 612 ATTITUDES. 

PSY 613 ATTRIBUTION. 

PSY 614 STRESS AND COPING. 

PSY 615 CROSS-CULTURAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. 

PSY 620 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN COGNITION. 

PSY 635 PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT. 

PSY 650 VOCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

PSY 665 WORK MOTIVATION. 

PSY 671 PSYCHOLOGY OF FAMILIES AND PARENTING. 

PSY 672 PERSONALITY MEASUREMENT. 

PSY 674 PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTION I. 

PSY 675 PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTION II. 

PSY 676 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT. 



182 



PSY 677 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT. 

PSY 680 SYSTEMS THEORY AND APPUCATIONS IN HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOP- 
MENT. 
PSY 681 QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION DESIGN. 

PSY 686 ADULTHOOD AND AGING: COGNITIVE AND INTELLECTUAL CHANGE. 
PSY 691 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 
PSY 693 PSYCHOLOGICAL CLINIC PRACTICUM. 
PSY 697 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN RESEARCH DESIGN. 
PSY 698 INTERNSIHP IN PSYCHOLOGY. 
PSY 699 THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 

Public Administration 

Degree Offered: Master of Public Administration 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. H. Svara, Program Director 

Box 8102, (919) 515-5159, svara@social.chass.ncsu.edu 

Professors: C. K. Coe, G. D. Garson, M. S. Soroos, D. W. Stewart; Associate 
Professors: D. M. Daley, E. O'Sullivan, J. E. Swiss, M. L. Vasu; Assistant 
Professor: R. L. Korosec; Visiting Assistant Professor: S. K. Straus 

Administrative specialties are available in the following areas: administration of justice, 
association/non-profit management, data management, environmental poUcy and 
management, financial management, human resource management and urban/local 
government management. 

Admission Requirements: Since a limited number of pre-service students (i.e., those 
without professional or managerial work positions) are admitted, these apphcants are 
encouraged to submit all materials by May 15 in order to receive full consideration. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The MP A degree is a 40-semester-hour program con- 
sisting of several overlapping tiers: (1) prerequisites to program admission including a 
course in economics and an intermediate-level course in statistics; (2) a core curriculum 
of 1 7 hours ; (3) a choice of administrative sjjecialties based on courses in public ad- 
ministration and other departments; and (4) an internship or field experience requirement 
for pre-service stud^its. ft is an option B with a one-person committee and no final oral 
examination. 

Student Financial Support: A limited number of fellowships and graduate assistantships 
are offered by the department. Contact the department for more information. Other 
forms of student aid are described in the financial aid section of the Graduate Bulletin. 
Students interested in financial assistance should apply by April 1 . 



183 



Other Relevant Information: The MP A program regularly conducts an Assessment 
Center to enhance students' skills in oral communication, technical writing and group 
dynamics. It is required for pre-service students. Activities include technical writing 
evaluations, evaluations of oral presentation skills and in-basket exercises to measure 
interpersonal, problem-solving and managerial skills. These exercises enable students 
to gain valuable training beyond their academic experience. 

GRAnjjATFM rnriR^FS 

PA 505 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW. 

PA 510 ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE. 

PA 511 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 

PA 513 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR. 

PA 515 ADMINISTRATION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE. 

PA 516 PUBUC POLICY ANALYSIS. 

PA 518 ORGANIZATION DESIGN. 

PA 520 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY. 

PA 536 ASSOCIATION MANAGEMENT. 

PA 570 PUBLIC MANAGEMENT COMPUTING LAB. 

PA 571 RESEARCH METHODS AND ANALYSIS. 

PA 573 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS. 

PA 574 DATA MANAGEMENT IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 

PA 580 INDEPENDENT STUDY. 

PA 590 READINGS AND RESEARCH. 

PA 598 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 

PA 601 POLITICS AND ETHICS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 

PA 608 SEMINAR IN URBAN MANAGEMENT. 

PA 611 SEMINAR IN PUBLIC PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT. 

PA 612 THE BUDGETARY PROCESS. 

PA 613 GOVERNMENT AND PLANNING. 

PA 614 MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 

PA 616 SEMINAR IN PROGRAM EVALUATION. 

PA 617 SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATION THEORY. 

PA 618 TEAM BUILDING FOR PUBLIC MANAGERS. 

PA 619 INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

PA 620 ENVIRONMENTAL ADMINISTRATION. 

PA 621 COLLECTIVE NEGOTIATIONS IN THE PUBLIC SERVICE. 

PA 691 INTERNSmP IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS. . 

Public History 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see history. 

Reading 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see curriculum and 
instruction. 



184 



Rural Sociology 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see sociology. 

Science Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see mathematics and science 
education. 

Social Studies Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see curriculum and 
instruction. 

Sociology and Anthropology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Sociology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. B. Clifford U, Head of the Department 

Professor M. D. Schulman, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8017, (919) 515-2702, Fax (919) 515-2610, michael_schulman@ncsu.edu 

Professors.L. R. Delia Fave, V. A. Hiday, J. C. Leiter, R. L. Moxley, L. B. Otto, 
M. M. Sawhney, D. Tomaskovic-Devey, R. C. Wimberley, E. M. Woodrum, M. 
A. Zahn, M. T. Zingraff; Professors Emeriti: E. M. Crawford, T. N. Hobgood Jr., 
C. P. Marsh, O. Uzzell, M. E. Voland, J. N. Young.; Associate Professors: M. P. 
Atkinson, R. F. Czaja, A. C. Davis, S. K. Garber, G. D. Hill, T. J. Hoban, S. C. 
Lilley, P. L. McCall, B. J. Risman, M. L. Schwalbe, M. Thomas, M. S. 
Thompson, R. J. Thomson, K. M. Troost, M. L. Walek, J. M. Wallace, HI, C. R. 
Zimmer; Associate Professors Emeriti: R. C. Brisson, J. G. Peck; Assistant 
Professors: R. S. Ellovich, T. N. Greenstein, A. L. Schiller, W. R. Smith; Assistant 
Professors Emeriti: C. G. Dawson, T. M. Hyman 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE PROGRAM 

Professor: R. D. Mustian 

The department offers master's and doctoral programs in sociology designed to prepare 
students for academic, research, and appUed careers. The programs are structured to 



185 



provide an intellectually stimulating and academically rigorous, yet supportive, environ- 
ment that emphasizes developing research skills through course work and close 
collaboration with faculty. 

Admissions Requirements: In addition to general Graduate School requirements, appli- 
cants are required to provide a writing sample. For fall admission, the completed appli- 
cation should be received no later than February 1 to ensure full consideration for assist- 
antship support; final deadline for fall admission is April 15. AppUcations for spring 
admission are considered under special circumstances, but assistantship support is less 
likely; final deadline for spring admission is November 1. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Apphcants should have received/be receiving a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with a major in sociology. Other majors 
are considered, but studaits may have to make up deficiencies without credit. The M.S. 
requires a thesis, whereas a Master of Sociology (M.SOC.) requires 6 semester credit 
hours of practicum (sujjervised field placement in an organization or agency) and a 
research paper. A minor for both degrees is optional. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The Ph.D. normally requires a master's in sociology, 
at least 14 courses (including or after the master's). Doctoral students take core courses 
in theoiy and methods/ analysis and select courses in two areas of specialization. Some 
course work from the master's may be applied. A minor is optional. 

Student Financial Support: Teaching and research assistantships and a limited number 
of out-of-state tuition waivers are available on a competitive basis. 

nRAnriATFS rnuRSFS 

SOC501 LEADERSfflP. 

SOC 502 SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

SOC505 MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY. 

SOC 508 SOCIAL ORGANIZATION. 

SOC 509 POPULATION PROBLEMS. 

SOC 510 WORK AND INDUSTRY. 

SOC 511 CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. 

SOC 512 SURVEY OF FAMILY SOCIOLOGY. 

SOC 513 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 

SOC 514 DEVELOPING SOCIETIES. 

SOC 515 DEVIANT BEHAVIOR. 

SOC 516 SOCIAL CONTROL. 

SOC 520 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION. 

SOC 523 SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT. 

SOC 534 SOCIOLOGY OF U.S. AGRICULTURE. 

SOC 541 SOCIAL SYSTEMS AND PLANNED CHANGE. 

SOC 555 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION. 

SOC(EB) 574 THE ECONOMICS OF POPULATION. 

SOC 590 APPLIED RESEARCH. 

SOC 591 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY. 

186 



SOC 595 PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY. 

SOC601 URBAN ECOLOGY. 

SOC 610 FORMAL ORGANIZATIONS. 

SOC 611 RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY I. 

SOC 612 RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY IL 

SOC 615 RESEARCH ON CRIME AND DEVIANCE. 

SOC 616 CRIME AND COLLECTIVE ACTION. 

SOC 621 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

SOC 622 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF INEQUALITY. 

SOC 625 SOCIAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN HEALTH AND ILLNESS. 

SOC 628 SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER. 

SOC 632 CONTEMPORARY FAMILY THEORY AND RESEARCH. 

SOC 633 THE COMMUNITY. 

SOC 641 QUANTITATIVE SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS. 

SOC 646 ADVANCED SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS. 

SOC 650 CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. 

SOC 652 COMPARATIVE SOCIETIES. 

SOC 655 THEORY CONSTRUCTION. 

SOC 690 SEMINAR. 

SOC 699 RESEARCH IN SOCIOLOGY. 

Soil Science 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Agriculture, Master of Natural 
Resources Administration 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

William Need Reynolds Professor E. J. Kamprath, Head of the Department 
Professor CD. Raper Jr., Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7619, (919) 515-2643, david_raper@ncsu.edu 

William Ned Reynolds Professor and Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor: S. 
W. Buol 

Professors: A. Amoozegar, S. W. Broome, D. K. Cassel, F. R. Cox, J. W. Gilliam, 
T. L. Grove, M. T. Hoover, L. D. King, H. J. Kleiss, G. S. Miner, M. J. Vepraskas, 
R. J. Volk, J. B. Weber, A. G. Wollum H, J. P. ZahX^r^si;. Professors (USDA): D. W. 
Israel; Adjunct Professor: R. J. McCracken; Professors Emeriti: J. V. Baird, W, V. 
Bartholomew, M. G. Cook, G. A. Cummings, R. W. Cummings, R. B. Daniels, C. 
B. Davey, W. A. Jackson, C. B. McCants, R. E. McCollum. J. A. Phillips, P. A. 
Sanchez, E. D. Seneca, S. B. Weed; Associate Professors: S. C. Hodges, G. D. 
Hoyt, R. A. McLaughlin, G. C. Naderman, J. E. Shelton, T. J. Smyth, M. G. 
Wagger; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. P. Lilly; Assistant Professors: C. R. 
Crozier, D. L. R. Hesterberg, D. L. Lindbo, R. L. Mikkelsen; Assistant Professor 
Emeritus: C. K. Martin; Senior Researcher: W. P. Robarge 



187 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: H. L. AUot Jr., R. Lea, G. F. Peedin, R. W. Skaggs; Associate Professor 
(USDA): S. R. Shafer 

Graduate students in soil science may specialize in the following subdisciplines: soil 
physics, soil chemistry; soil microbiology and biochemistry; soil fertility and plant 
nutrition; soil genesis, morphology and classification; soil and water management and 
conservation; forest soils, soil mineralogy; tropical soil management. 

Admissions Requirements: Graduate students accepted in soil science must have a 
bachelor's or master's degree with a major in soil science or a closely related field and 
with a strong backgrovmd in the biological and physical sciences. 

Master's Degree Requirements: A minor is optional, although one-third of the credits 
should usually be in courses outside of the department. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Normally students take 30 hours credit beyond the 
Master's degree. A minor is optional, although one-third of the credits should usually 
be in courses outside of the department. 

Student Financial Support: The department has a number of assistantships available to 
students who have demonstrated a high level of academic aptitute or potential. Most of 
the graduate assistantships are half-time. 

GRAniJATKS. CnilRfiFS. 

SSC 501 TROPICAL SOILS: CHARACTERISTICS AND MANAGEMENT. 

SSC511 SOIL PHYSICS. 

SSC 520 SOIL AND PLANT ANALYSIS. 

SSC 522 SOIL CHEMISTRY. 

SSC(MB) 532 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY. 

SSC 541 SOIL FERTILITY. 

SSC 551 SOIL MORPHOLOGY, GENESIS AND CLASSIFICATION. 

SSC 553 SOIL MINERALOGY. 

SSC 560 ADVANCED SOIL MANAGEMENT. 

SSC 562 ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF SOIL SCIENCE. 

SSC(FOR) 577 CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT I: CONCEPTS AND 

METHODS. 
SSC(FOR) 578 CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT II: INTEGRATED 

PROBLEM SOLVING. 
SSC(FOR) 581 AGROFORESTRY. 
SSC 590 SPECIAL PROBLEMS. 
SSC 621 ADVANCED SOIL CHEMISTRY. 
SSCi(CS,HS) 625 HERBICIDE CHEMISTRY. 

SSC(CS,HS) 627 HERBICIDE BEHAVIOR IN SOIL AND WATER. 
SSC(BAE) 671 THEORY OF DRAINAGE-SATURATED FLOW. 
SSC 672 SOIL PROPERTIES AND PLANT DEVELOPMENT. 



188 



SSC(FOR) 673 FOREST PRODUCTIVITY: EDAPfflC RELATIONSIOPS. 

SSC(BAE) 674 THEORY OF DRAINAGE-UNSATURATED FLOW. 

SSC(BAE) 680 TRANSPORT AND FATE OF CHEMICALS IN SOILS AND NATURAL WATERS. 

SSC690 SEMINAR. 

SSC693 COLLOQUIUM IN SOIL SCIENCE. 

SSC699 RESEARCH. 



Special Education 



For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see curriculum and 
instruction. 

Statistics 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Statistics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. M. Gerig, Head of the Department 
Professor S. G. Pantula, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8203, (919) 515-2528, dsgp@stat.ncsu.edu 

Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor: B. B. Bhattacharyya 
William Neal Reynolds Professor: B. S. Weir 

Professors: R. L. Berger, P. Bloomfield, D. D. Boos, C. Brownie, D. A. Dickey, 
E. J. Dietz, S. P. Ellner, F. G. Giesbrecht, T. Johnson, J. F. Monahan, D. W. 
Nychka, K. H. Pollock, C. H. Proctor, C. P. Quesenberry, D. L. Ridgeway, D. 
L. Solomon, L. A. Stefanski, W. H. Swallow, J. L. Wasik; Ac(funct Professors: M. 
W. Anderson, J. R. Chromy, J. H. Goodnight, P. D. Haaland, N. L. Kaplan, P. H. 
Morgan, R. L. Obenchain; Professors Emeriti: C. C. Cockerham, H. J. Gold, A. H. 
Grandage, R. J. Hader, D. W. Hayne, D. D. Mason, R. J. Monroe, L. A. Nelson, J. 
O. Rawhngs, J. A. Rigney, R. G. Steel, H. R. Van Der Vaart, O. Wesler; Associate 
Professors: M. L. Gumpertz, J. Lu, T. W. Reiland, C. E. Smith; Research Associate 
Professor. S. Zeng; Atjjunct Associate Professor. T. K. Pierson; Associate Professors 
Emeriti: A. C. Linnerud; Assistant Professors: J. M. Hughes-OUver, T. B. Kepler, 
J. L. Thome, W. A. Wang; A^unct Assistant Professors: P. M. Dixon, J. S. Kimbell, 
M. W. Lutz 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: W. R. Atchley, J. F. Gilliam, M. M. Goodman, A. R. Hall, J. F. Selgrade, 
M. W. Suh, G. G. Wilkerson; Associate Professors: T. H. Emigh, B. G. Fitzpatrick 



189 



Admission Requirements: The written statement should describe the appUcant's 
academic and career goals as well as special interests in the area of statistics. GRE 
Subject Test scores in mathematics are not required but may be submitted. 

The well-prepared applicant to the department's master's programs has good grades in 
a three-semester calculus sequence, a two-semester advanced calculus sequence, a 
semester of Unear algebra and a two-semester sequence in probabihty and statistics. 
Some of these courses may be taken as part of the program, but this may result in 
l^igth^iing the stay. Admission to the Ph.D. program is granted to those who have been 
admitted to the master's program and have passed the basic comprehensive (qualifying) 
examination at the Ph.D. level. Individuals applying for fall enrollment and who wish 
to be considered for financial aid should have their completed apphcations in by no later 
than March 1 for fall enrollment or October 15 for spring. Apphcations arriving after 
that will be considered but may be assigned lower priority. 

Master's Degree Requirements: All master's programs in statistics require a minimum 
of 34 credit hours, of which 12 are first-year core (ST 512, ST 521,522 and ST 681), 
one is supervised consulting (ST 595), and at least nine are statistics and/or supporting 
electives. The remaining 12 hours are program dependent. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: The Ph.D. program in statistics requires 22 credit 
hours beyond the master's, of which 12 are Ph.D. core (ST(MA) 617,618, ST 636 and 
ST 637), one is supervised consulting (ST 595), six are Ph.D. -level statistics electives, 
aiKl three are supporting electives. Requirements for co-majors are individually tailored. 

Student Financial Support: Departmental assistantships and fellowships are awarded 
each year on a con^jetitive basis. Fellowships and supplements are provided through the 
department's Gertrude M. Cox Fellowship Fimd. Approximately 30 teaching assistant- 
ships and 30 research assistantships and traineeships are available along with 10 
graduate industrial traineeships supported by local industries. 

Other Relevant lT\formation: With a large graduate faculty representing virtually all 
major statistical specializations, the department is recognized as a world leader in 
graduate education and research in statistics. Its appUed orientation sets it apart from 
most other departments in the country, offering education to those wishing to pursue 
careers as consulting statisticians in industry and government, as well as to those 
seeking careers in research and teaching. 

Areas of research specialization of the faculty and advanced graduate students include 
time series, econometrics, statistical genres and ecology, experiment design and analy- 
sis, sampling, environmental apphcations, statistical process and quahty control, bio- 
mathematics, statistical computing, nonparametric regression, robust and nonparametric 



190 



infer^ice, mathematical programming, Bayesian inference, multivariate analysis, decis- 
ion theory and stochastic processes. 

nRAniJATFS rnijRws 

ST 505 APPLIED NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS. 
ST(ZO) 506 SAMPLING ANIMAL POPULATIONS. 
ST 507 STATISTICS FOR TIIE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES I. 
ST 508 STATISTICS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES II. 
ST 511 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES I. 
ST 512 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES II. 
ST 513 STATISTICS FOR MANAGEMENT I 

ST 514 STATISTICS FOR MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES II. 
ST 515, 516 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR ENGINTIERS. 
ST 517 APPLIED LEAST SQUARES. 
ST 518 APPLIED TIME SERIES ANALYSIS. 
ST 519 APPLIED MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS. 
ST 521 STATISTICAL THEORY I. 
ST 522 STATISTICAL THEORY II. 
ST 531 DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS. 
ST 535 STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL. 
ST 536 OFF-LINE QUALITY CONTROL. 
ST 537 UFE-TESTING AND RELIABILITY. 
ST(MA) 541 THEORY OF PROBABILITY I. 
ST(MA) 542 INTRODUCTION TO STOCHASTIC PROCESSES. 
ST 550 CATEGORICAL AND CENSORED DATA ANALYSIS. 
ST(ECG) 561 INTERMEDIATE ECONOMETRICS. 
ST(TOX) 563 STATISTICAL PROBLEMS IN TOXICOLOGY. 
ST 564 APPLIED SPATIAL STATISTICS. 
ST (GN) 565 GENETIC DATA ANALYSIS. 
ST(BMA,MA) 571 BIOMATHEMATICS I. 
ST(BMA,MA) 572 BIOMATHEMATICS II. 
ST(BMA,OR) 575 DECISION ANALYTIC MODELING. 
ST 581 ROBUST AND NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS. 
ST 583 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL DECISION THEORY. 
ST 591 SPECIAL PROBLEMS. 
ST 595 STATISTICAL CONSULTING. 
ST(MA,OR) 606 NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING. 
ST(BMA,MA,OR) 610 STOCHASTIC MODELING. 
ST 613 TIME SERIES ANALYSIS: TIME DOMAIN. 
ST 614 TIME SERIES ANALYSIS: FREQUENCY DOMAIN. 
ST(MA) 617, 618 MEASURE THEORY AND ADVANCED PROBABILITY. 
ST 623 STATISTICS IN PLANT SCIENCE. 
ST(GN) 626 STATISTICAL CONCEPTS IN GENETICS. 
ST 631 THEORY OF SAMPLING APPLIED TO SURVEY DESIGN. 
ST 636 ADVANCED STATISTICAL INFERENCE I. 
ST 637 ADVANCED STATISTICAL INFERENCE II. 
ST 645 STATISTICAL COMPUTING. 
ST(ECG) 651 ECONOMETRICS. 
ST(ECG) 652 TOPICS IN ECONOMETRICS. 

ST 671 ADVANCED ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE AND VARIANCE COMPONENTS. 
ST 674 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL DE- 
SIGNS. 
ST 681 UNEAR MODELS AND VARIANCE COMPONENTS. 



191 



ST 682 MULTIVARIATE UNEAR MODELS AND NONUNEAR MODELS. 

ST 683 MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS. 

ST 691 ADVANCED SPECIAL PROBLEMS. 

ST 694 SEMINAR. 

ST 699 RESEARCH. 

Technical Communications 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see English. 

Technology Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see mathematics and science 
education. 

Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Master of Textiles 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. J. Little, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor W. Oxenham, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 8301, (919) 515-6573, william_oxenham@ncsu.edu 

Klopman Distinguished Professor: S. C. Winchester Jr. 

Professors: R. A. Bamhardt, S. K. Batra, G. A. Berkstresser HI, R. A. Donaldson, A. 
H. H-Shiddi, M. W. Suh; Visiting Professors: E. M. McPherson; Adjunct Professor: 
D. S. Brookstein; Professors Emeriti: A. B. Moss, W. C. Stuckey Jr.; Associate 
Professors: P. Banks-Lee, T. K. Ghosh, T. F. Gilmore, M.L. Robinson Jr., A. M. 
Seyam, G. W. Smith; Associate Professor Emeritus: P. B. Hudson; Visiting Research 
Associate Professor: H. A. Davis; Adjunct Associate Professors: R. W. Dent, N. A. 
Hunter, D. M. Powell, P. E. Sasser; Assistant Professors: H. H. A. Hergeth, G, L. 
Hodge 

The Department of Textile axKl Aj>parel, Technology and Management offers the degree 
of Master of Scioice in Textiles with specialization in textile management and technol- 
ogy and the professional degree of Master of Textiles. The department specializes in the 
disciplines of textile management, apparel management, textile technology, textile 
design, integrated manufacturing systems, textile marketing, quahty control and 
modeling of the textile and apparel pipeline. Fundamental research in yam and fabric 



192 



mechanics, machine monitoring and material properties is also conducted in the 
department. 

Admission Requirements: Students applying to this department should have or be able 
to develop strong quantitative skills. Students interested in management areas should 
have background in maricet analysis, quantitative management and quahty management. 
Students should have a minimum of 24 course hours in advanced mathematics and 
sciences in their undergraduate degree. 

Master's Degree Requirements: Completion of the professional degree. Master of 
Textiles, requires a minimum of 33 course hours. 

Student Financial Support: Financial aid in the form of assistantships is normally avail- 
able for all full-time Master of Science students. 

Other Relevant Information: The Department of Textile and Apparel Technology and 
Manag^nent currently houses the National Science Foundation's Center for Nonwoven 
Technology. This Centers allows students to conduct research in new technologies for 
nonwoven fabric manufacture. Participation in the National Textile Center allows stu- 
dents to conduct research in a variety of management, manufacturing, technology and 
engineering applications. 

GRADTJATES COURSFS 

TAM(TES) 520 YARN PROCESSING DYNAMICS. 

TAM 530 TEXTILE QUALITY COP^ROL. 

TAM 541 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF KNITTED FABRIC PRODUCTION AND CONTROL. 

TAM 549 WARP KNIT ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DESIGN. 

TAM(TES) 555 PRODUCTION MECHANICS AND PROPERTIES OF WOVEN FABRICS. 

TAM(BUS)585 MARKET RESEARCH IN TEXTILES. 

TAM 589 SPECIAL STUDIES IN TEXTILE MANAGEMENT AND TECH-NOLOGY. 

TAM 590 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN TEXTILE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY. 

TAM(TES) 620 YARN PRODUCTION/PROPERTIES: ADVANCED TOPICS. 

TAM 621 ADVANCED TEXTILE TESTING. 

TAM(TES) 640 PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF KNITTED FABRIC. 

TAM(TES) 651, 652 FABRIC DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION. 

TAM(TES) 663 MECHANICS OF TWISTED STRUCTURES. 

TAM(TES) 664 MECHANICS OF FABRIC STRUCTURES. 

TAM 680 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN TEXTILE MANAGEMENT. 

TAM 686 ADVANCED TEXTILE LABOR MANAGEMENT SEMINAR. 

TAM 687 COMPETITIVE STRATEGY AND PLANNING FOR THE TEXTILE FIRM. 

TAM 697 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN TEXTILES. 

TAM 698 SEMINAR. 

TAM 699 TEXTILE THESIS OR DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 



193 



Textile Chemistry 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see textile engineering, 
chemistry and science. 

Textile Engineering 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see textile engineering, 
chemistry and science. 

Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science 

Degrees Offered: M.S. in Textile Chemistry, M. S. in Textile Engineering, M.S. 
in Textile Materials Science, Master of Textiles 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Burlington Professor M. H. M. Mohamed, Head of the Department 

Ciba-Geigy Professor: H. S. Freeman, Associate Head and Director of Graduate 

Programs 

Box 8301, (919) 515-6636, harold_freeman@ncsu.edu 

Cone Mills Professor: R. McGregor 

Professors: R. L. Barker, K. R. Beck, D. R. Buchanan, P. L. Grady, B. S. Gupta, C. 
D. Livengood, G. N. Mock, C. B. Smith, M. H. Theil, C. Tomasino, A. E. ToneUi, 
P. A. Tucker Jr.; Adjunct Professors: R. F. Goldman, T. lijima, J. Preston, T. Y. 
Tam; Professors Emeriti' K. S. Campbell, D. M. Gates, J. A. Cuculo, P. D. Emerson, 
R. D. Gilbert, D. S. Hamby, S. P. Hersh, P. R. Lord, H. A. Rutherford, W. K. Walsh, 
W. M. Whaley, R. W. Work; Associate Professors: T. G. Clapp, H. Hamouda, S. M. 
Hudson, J. W. Rucker, J. P. Rust; Research Associate Professor: M. B. Guimer; 
Visiting Associate Professor: I. Shalev; Adjunct Associate Professors: W. P. Behnke, 
L. D. Claxton, W. D. Hunter, T. Montgomery; Associate Professors Emeriti: T. H. 
Guion, A. C. Hayes, T. G. Rochow; Assistant Professors: W. J. Jasper, M. G. 
McCord, M. Srinivasarao; Visiting Assistant Professor. K. G. Titus; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: A. C. Bullerwell, Y. Wang 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: S. K. Batra, R. E. Fomes 



194 



Master of Science in Textile Chemistry (MS/TC): The M.S. in textile chemistry 
program offers unique educational and research opportunities in textile and polymer 
chonistry. Fundam^itals of chemistry, physics, and mathematical sciences are appUed 
to solve polymer and textile wet processing problems. M.S. in Textiles with 
Specialization in Textile Materials Science (MS/TEM): The M.S. in textiles with a 
specialization in textile materials sci^ice program offers unique educational and research 
opportunities in fiber science. Fundamentals of physics, engineering, and mathematical 
sciences are apphed to textile-related problems. 

Admission Requirements: (MS/TC): AppUcants must have a physical science or 
aigineering background, including physical chemistry and differential equations. Formal 
education in textile or polymer chemistry is desired but not required. (MS/T): 
Applicants must have a physical science or engineering background and differential 
equations. Some background in textiles is desired but not required. 

Degree Requirements: (MS/TC): This degree requires 15 credit hours in textile 
chemistiy, nine credit hours in a minor, six credit hours of research, and two semester 
audits of the College S^ninar (TC 698). (MS/T): This degree requires nine credit hours 
from a core of fiber science and mechanics courses, nine credit hours in a minor, six 
credit hours of research, six hours of electives, and two semester audits of the College 
Seminar (TES 698). 

Student Financial Support: Financial aid in the form of assistantships and fellowships 
is normally available for all full-time students. 

Other Relevant Ir\formation: The department either houses or has access to all major 
analytical tools necessaiy to effect a qpaahty research program covering a wide range of 
topics. It also houses state-of-the-art facihties for conducting research in fiber science 
and textile engineering. Close cooperation between College faculty and the fiber/textile 
and allied industries provides students with opportunities for learning and employment. 

GRAnUATES COURSES 

TC 504 FIBER FORMATION-THEORY AND PRACTICE. 

TC505 THEORY OF DYEING. 

TC506 COLOR SCIENCE. 

TC507 COLOR LABORATORY. 

TC 520 CHEMISTRY OF DYES AND COLOR. 

TC 521 DYE SYNTHESIS LABORATORY. 

TC525 DYEING CELLULOSE. 

TC 530 THE CHEMISTRY OF TEXTILE AUXILIARIES. 

TC(MAT) 561 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY OF POLYMERS. 

TC(CH,MAT) 562 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS-BULK PROPERTIES. 

TC 565 POLYMER APPLICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY. 

TC(CHE) 569 POLYMERS, SURFACTANTS AND COLLOIDAL MATERIALS. 

TC 591 SPECIAL TOPICS IN TEXTILE SCIENCE. 



195 



TES500 FIBER AND POLYMER MICROSCOPY. 

TES 505 TEXTILE INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS. 

TESfTAM) 520 YARN PROCESSING DYNAMICS. 

TES(TAM) 555 PRODUCTION MECHANICS AND PROPERTIES OF WOVEN FABRICS. 

TES 561 MECHANICAL AND RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FIBROUS MATERIAL. 

TES 562 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF FIBER FORMING POLYMERS, FIBERS AND FIBROUS 
STRUCTURES. 

TES(MAT) 563 CHARACTERIZATION OF STRUCTURE OF FIBER FORMING POLYMERS. 

TES 565 TEXTILE COMPOSITES. 

TES 589 SPECIAL STUDIES IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE. 

TES 590 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE. 

TC(CH,MAT) 662 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS-SOLUTION PROPERT- 
IES. 

TC(CHE) 669 DIFFUSION IN POLYMERS. 2(2-0) 

TC(CHE) 671 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLYMER SCIENCE. 

TC(TES) 691 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FIBER SCIENCE. 

TC 698 SEMINAR FOR TEXTILE CHEMISTRY. 

TC 699 TEXTILE RESEARCH FOR TEXTILE CHEMISTRY. 

TESfTAM) 640 PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF KNITTED FABRIC. 

TES(TAM) 651, 652 FABRIC DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION. 

TES(TAM) 663 MECHANICS OF TWISTED STRUCTURES. 

TES(TAM) 664 MECHANICS OF FABRIC STRUCTURES. 

TES(TC) 691 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FIBER SCIENCE. 

TES 697 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN TEXTILES. 

TES 698 SENHNAR. 

TES 699 TEXTILE THESIS OR DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 

Textile Management and Technology 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see textile and apparel 
management. 

Textile Materials Science 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see textile engineering, 
chemistry and science. 

Textile Technology Management 

Degree Offered: Ph.D. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor CD. Livengood, Program Director 

Box 8301, (919) 515-6643, charles_livengood@ncsu.edu 

Professors: R. A. Earnhardt, S. K. Batra, K. R. Beck, G. A. Berkstresser m, R. A. 
Donaklson, S. E. Elmaghraby, A. H. El-Shiekh, S.-C. Fang, P. L. Grady, B. S. Gupta, 



196 



D. M. Holthausen Jr., T. J. Little, S. E. Margolis, M. H. M. Mohamed, C. B. Smith, 
C. Tomasino, S. C. Winchester; Professors Emeriti: J. R. Canada, A. B. Moss; 
Associate Professors: P. Banks-Lee, J. C. Beghin, T. F. Gihnore, S. M. Hudson, M. 
W. Suh, W. Oxenham, J. P. Rust, A. M. Seyam; Associate Professor Emeritus: P. B. 
Hudson; Assistant Professors: T. K. Ghosh, H. H. A. Hergeth, G. L. Hodge, J. W. 
Rucker 

Textile technology management is a multidisciplinary program designed to educate 
students for research careers in the management of technology in the fiber, textile, 
apparel and related industries complex. The program is designed to give the students a 
breadth of knowledge of the materials and technologies employed in the industries as 
well as the quantitative and analytical tools of management. 

Admission Requirements: Students majoring in textiles; industrial, systems and manu- 
facturing engineering; statistics; of>erations research; computer science; economics; 
consumer economics; marketing; and business administration, and having at least a 
3.0/4.0 average in their imdergraduate studies and a master's degree will normally 
qualify for admission. Exceptionally qualified students may be admitted directly without 
a master's degree. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Students are admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. 
degree after passing two preliminary written and oral examinations (the first covering 
manufacturing technology and the second the management of technology) and orally 
defaxling a research proposal. They must also have passed an EngUsh technical writing 
course during their college career and, dej^ending on the nature of their research inter- 
ests, may also be required to d^nonstrate a reading knowledge of one foreign language. 

Student Financial Support: Financial aid in the form of assistantships and fellowships 
is normally available for all ftill-time students. 

Other Relevant Iriformation: In 1991, the College of Textiles moved to its new 298,000 
square-foot complex, now valued at over $50 miUion, which houses exceptional 
teaching, research, computer and hbrary facihties. With a graduate faculty of 45 and 
research expenditures exceeding $6,000,000 in fiscal year 1992/93, opportunities 
abound. Facihties available to textile technology management students include: the 
Model Manufacturing Facihty which contains over $10,000,000 of textile processing 
equipment from fiber formation to end products; the IBM Computer Integrated 
Manufacturing (CIM) Facihty which contains PS/2's, AS/400 and RS/6000 computers 
running plant floor, suj)ervisory monitoring and control, and manufacturing resource 
planning software packages; and the Textile Design Laboratory which contains several 
design packages which can co mmuni cate with plant floor devices providing CAD /CAM 
integration. 



197 



COTTRSF. Ol<'F'F.RTNCS- (Exteasive use may be made of graduate course offerings in other colleges 
on campus when developing the minor field. See dq)artmental listing for descriptions) 

CRADTTATF rOTTRSF*^ TN AHFAS OF SPFrTATJZATTON 

TAM(TES) 520 YARN PROCESSING DYNAMICS 

TAM 530 TEXTILE QUALITY CONTROL 

TAM(TES) 541 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF KNITTED FABRIC PRODUCTION AND 

CONTROL 
TAM 549 WARP KNIT ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DESIGN 
TAM(TES) 555 PRODUCTION MECHANICS AND PROPERTIES OF WOVEN FABRICS 
TES565 TEXTILE COMPOSITES 
TAM(BUS) 585 MARKET RESEARCH IN TEXTILES 

TAM 589 SPECIAL STUDIES IN TEXTILE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 
TAM 590 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN TEXTILE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 
TAM 610 YARN PRODUCTION PROPERTIES 
TAM 621 ADVANCED TEXTILE TESTING 
TES 631 SYNTHETIC FIBERS 

TAM(TES) 640 PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF KNITTED FABRIC 
TAM(TES) 651, 652 FABRIC DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION 
TAM(TES) 663 MECHANICS OF TWISTED STRUCTURES 
TAM(TES) 664 MECHANICS OF FABRIC STRUCTURES 
TAM 680 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN TEXTILE MANAGEMENT 
TAM 686 ADVANCED TEXTILE LABOR MANAGEMENT SEMINAR 
TAM 687 COMPETITIVE STRATEGY AND PLANNING FOR THE TEXTILE FIRM 
TAM 697 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN TEXTILES 

Toxicology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Toxicology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

William Neal Reynolds and Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor E. Hodgson, 

Head of the Department 

(919) 515-2595 

Professor R. B. Leidy, Director of Graduate Programs 

Box 7633, (919)515-2090 

Adjunct Professors: J. A. Bond, J, A. Goldstein, R. J. Langenbach, R. M. Philpot, R. 
J. Preston; Professor Emeritus: T. J. Sheets; Associate Professors: G. A. LeBlanc, R. 
C. Smart; Research Associate Professor: P. E. Levi; A(^unct Associate Professor: A. 
E. Chalmer, N. Chemoff, K. M. Crofton, H. B. Matthews Jr.; Assistant Professors: 
S. Branch, D. Shea; Research Assistant Professor: S. A. Meyer; Visiting Assistant 
Professor: R. L. Rose 



198 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: K. B. Adler, A. L. Aronson, C. Brownie, C. F. Brownie, J. M. Cullen, W. 
E. Donaldson, H. M. Hassan, R. J. Kuhr, R. J. Linderman, W. H. McKenzie, N. A. 
Monteiro-Riveiere, M. A. Qureshi, J. E. Riviere, R. M. Roe; Professor (USDA): D. 
E. Moreland; Associate Professor: C. L. Robinette 

Admission Requirements: Prospective students should have a strong background in the 
biological and physical sciences with a minimum lindergraduate grade |X)int average of 
3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in the biological and physical sciences. 

Master of Science Degree Requirements: Students pursuing an M.S. degree specializing 
in environmental toxicology must enroll in TOX 515 Environmental Toxiology. 

Master of Toxicology Degree Requirements: A minimum of 14 credit hours in TOX 
courses are required. While a thesis is not required, at the discretion of the student's 
advisory committee, a review paper focusing on the student's interest in some aspect of 
toxicology might be required as a special problem (TOX 590). The requirements, in all 
other respects, are the same as for the M.TOX and M.S. degrees. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: A minimum of 37 credit hours is required for the Ph.D. 
degree. At least 20 hours must come from 500- and 600-level courses. 

Student Financial Support: Financial assistance is available for qualified applicants 
through traineeships, fellowships, teaching assistantships and research assistantships 
with participating faculty members. Approximately 90 percent of the students pursuing 
master's and doctoral degrees on campus currently receive financial assistance. 

Other Relevant Ir\formation: Students pursuing either the M.S. or Ph.D. degree may 
elect to specialize in environmental toxicology. Students who choose this option are 
required to enroll in TOX 515, Environmental Toxicology (3 credits), TOX 590E 
Special Problans in Toxicology: Environmental Fate of Chemicals (3 credits) and TOX 
590W Special Problems in Toxicology: Wildlife Toxicology (1 credit). At least 6 credit 
hours of course woiic is required in related disicplines {i.e. , ecology, forestry, zoology). 

rrRAnriAT FS COURSFS 

TOX 501 GENERAL TOXICOLOGY. 

TOX 510 BIOCHENflCAL TOXICOLOGY, 

TOX 515 ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY. 

TOX(ST) 563 STATISTICAL PROBLEMS IN TOXICOLOGY. 

TOX 590 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN TOXICOLOGY. 

TOX 601 CHEMICAL CARCINOGENESIS. 

TOX 604 CHEMICAL RISK ASSESSMENT. 

TOX(IMM) 605 IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY. 

TOX(BCH) 606 FREE RADICALS IN TOXICOLOGY. 

199 



TOX 690 TOXICOLOGY SEMINAR. 
TOX699 RESEARCH. 

rnfiR^F^ FROM AS^nriATFn dfpartmfnt^ 

BCH 553 METABOLISM AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. 

BCH601 MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURE. 

BCH 603 MACROMOLECULAR SYNTHESIS AND REGULATION. 

BCH 605 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL. 

BCH 661 ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL 

GN 560 MOLECULAR GENETICS. 

ST 511 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES I. 

VMS 554 PRINCIPLES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY. 

VMS 562 SYSTEMIC PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY. 

VMS 570 CELL BIOLOGY. 

VMS 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN VETERINARY MEDICAL SCIENCES. 

VMS 661 PHARMACOKINETICS. 

Z0 513 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. 

ZO560 PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY. 

Training and Development 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see adult and community 
college education. 

Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. H. Britt, Coordinator 

Box 8401, (919) 829-4262, jack_britt@ncsu.edu 

Burroughs Wellcome Distinguished Professor: J. E. Riviere 

Professors: C. F. Abrams Jr., K. B. Adler, K. L. Anderson, R. A. Argenzio, A. L. 
Aronson, C. E. Atkins, H. J. Barnes, E. B. Breitschwerdt, T. T. Brown Jr., C. F. 
Brownie, P. B. Carter, W. J. Croom Jr., J. M. Cullen, T. M. Curtin, E. V. 
DeBuysscher, D. J. De Young, L. N. Fleisher, O. J. Fletcher Jr., R. B. Ford, F. J. 
Fuller, T. E. Hamm Jr., B. Hammerberg, B. D. Harrington, M. G. Levy, D. J. 
Meuten, N. A. Monteiro-Riviere, E. J. Noga, N. C. Olson, P. E. Omdorff, W. D. 
Oxender, R. L. Page, L. E. Penyman, M. C. Roberts, P. L. Sannes, J. E. Smallwood, 
C. E. Stevens, E. A. Stone, M. K. Stoskopf, L. P. Tate Jr., C. Teng, D. E. Thrall, W. 
A. F. Tompkins; A(^unct Professors: J. J. Arends, R. L. Cooper, S. W. Crane, M. W. 
Dewhirst, J. P. Fetrow, J. Fine, R. R. Maronpot, J. A. Popp, F. Welsch; Professors 



200 



Emeriti: W. M. Adams, E. G. Batte, P. J. Bentley, H. A. Berkhoff, L. Coggins, D. 
R.Howard, R. C. Dillman, D. M. Hanson, J. K. Magor, D. J. Moncol; Associate 
Professors: G. W. Almond, S. A. Bai, H. M. Berschneider, K. F. Bowman, B. A. 
Breuhaus, D. G. Bristol, S. E. Bunch, P. Cowen, M. G. Davidson, W. M. Duckett, K. 
Flammer, J. E. Gadsby, B. C. Gilger, C. B. Grindem, J. S. Guy, E. M. Hardie, E. C. 
Hawkins, J. M. Hinshaw, L. C. Hudson, E. Hunt, B. W. Keene, J. F. Levine, D. H. 
Ley, M. B. McCaw, R. E. Meyer, B. P. Peters, M. A. Qureshi, D. V. Rives, C. L. 
Robinette, B. Sherry, B. D. Slenning, K. A. Spaulding, C. R. Swanson, M. B. 
Tompkins, S. L. Tonkonogy, S. D. Van Camp, D. P. Wages, M. D. Whitacre; 
Research Associate Professors: M. C. McGahan, B. A. Weeks-Perkins; Visiting 
Research Associate Professor: S. Kennedy-Stoskopf; A^unct Associate Professors: G. 
A. Boorman, R. C. Cattley, K. L. Dreher, T. L. Goldsworthy, J. J. Heindel, M. R. 
Loomis, E. E. McConnell, R. L. Peiffer Jr., J. A. Raleigh, D. C. Richardson, C. T. 
Teng, P. L. Williams; Assistant Professors: C. R. Berry, D. E. Bevier, M. T. Correa, 
P. R. Davies, J. Deen, N. E. Love, D. J. Marcellin, K. R. Munana, T. OUvry, S. C. 
Roe, G. M. Rogers, D. C. Sellon, L W. Smoak, G. J. Spodnick, S. L. Vaden, S. L. 
Vivrette, B. J. Weigler; Visiting Assistant Professors:. R. V. EngUsh, B. D Hansen; 
Ac^unct Assistant Professor: J. Everitt; Electron Microscopy Director: M. J. Dykstra 

Course offerings and research topics currently include, but are not limited to: immimol- 
ogy, cardiology, jAarmacokinetics, oncology, toxicology, gastroenterology, neurophysi- 
ology, r^jroductive physiololgy, biotechnology, microbiology, aquatic/wildlife biology, 
biomedical aigineering, endocrinology, molecular biology, pulmonary biology, epidemi- 
ology, p>opulation medicine, health systems monitoring, transplantation and radiology. 

Admission Requirements: All appUcations are reviewed by the Graduate Student 
Admissions Committee of the College, comjxjsed of faculty members representing each 
area of the graduate program. Scores from the GRE are required for admission by all 
applicants. Candidates who do not have a DVM degree must have a baccalaureate 
degree or advanced degree from a college or university recognized as standard by a 
regional or general accrediting agency. Students with a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) imder- 
graduate or DVM curriculum with appropriate course background will be considered 
for admission. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Credit hour requirements for the Ph.D. degree are 
determined by the graduate student's committee with approval of the Director of 
Graduate Programs and the Graduate School. 

Student Financial Support: Research assistantships are awarded to qualified candidates 
on the competitive basis by the College. These are for 12-month periods, and stipends 
are competitive with those of other programs. These positions are fimded by the grants 
of individual faculty members and the state appropriations to the College and depart- 
ments. 



201 



Other Relevant Ir\formation: The program is organized across traditional departmental 
lines as areas of concentration which include: cell biology /morphology, epidemiology/ 
population medicine, microbiology, pathology and pharmacology. These provide exten- 
sive interdisciplinary training and maintain a highly effective Uaison with graduate 
programs in other schools of the university, as well as those of nearby Duke University 
and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

nRAnjJATFS rmiR^FS 

VMS(BAE) 522 MECHANICS OF BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS. 
VMS 530 VETERINARY fflSTOLOGY. 

VMS 532 ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IN VETERINARY MEDICINE. 
VMS 540 RESEARCH ANIMAL CARE AND USE. 
VMS 550 VETERINARY MEDICAL VIROLOGY I. 
VMS 551 PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY AND MYCOLOGY. 
VMS 552 DIAGNOSTIC BACTERIOLOGY AND MYCOLOGY. 
VMS 553 VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY. 
VMS 554 PRINCIPLES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY. 
VMS(IMM) 555 IMMUNOPARASITOLOGY. 
VMS(IMM,MB,PHY,PO) 556 IMMUNOGENETICS. 
VMS 560 INTRODUCTORY PHARMACOLOGY. 

VMS 561 INSTRUMENTATION IN PHARMACOLOGICAL RESEARCH. 
VMS 562 SYSTEMIC PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY. 
VMS 570 CELL BIOLOGY. 

VMS 580 VETERINARY PRODUCTION EPIDEMIOLOGY. 
VMS 582 MARINE MAMMAL MEDICINE. 

VMS 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN VETERINARY MEDICAL SCIENCES. 
VMS 631 APPLIED VETERINARY ANATOMY I. 

VMS(ANS,NTR,PHY) 632 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM. 
VMS 642 ADVANCED SYSTEMIC HISTOPATHOLOGY. 
VMS 643 TOXICOLOGIC PATHOLOGY I. 
VMS 650 BACTERIAL PATHOGENIC MECHANISMS. 
VMS 651 VETERINARY MEDICAL VIROLOGY II. 
VMS(MB) 653 ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY. 

VMS 654 EPIDEMIOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES OF INTERNATIONAL IMPOR- 
TANCE. 
VMS 660 ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY. 
VMS 661 PHARMACOKINETICS. 

VMS 690A SPECIAL TOPICS IN VETERINARY MICROBIOLOGY. 
VMS 690B SPECIAL TOPICS IN PATHOLOGY. 

VMS 690C SPECIAL TOPICS IN LABORATORY PHARMACOLOGY. 
VMS 690D SPECIAL TOPICS IN CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

VMS(IMM) 691 ADVANCED TOPICS IN IMMUNOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY. 
VMS 692 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ZOOLOGICAL MEDICINE I. 
VMS 693 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ZOOLOGICAL MEDICINE H. 
VMS 694A SENHNAR IN NECROPSY PATHOLOGY. 
VMS 694B SEMINAR IN SURGICAL PATHOLOGY. 

VMS(IMM) 695A SEMINAR IN VETERINARY MICROBIOLOGY/ IMMUNOLOGY. 
VMS696A SEMINAR IN PHARMACOLOGY. 
VMS 697 SEMINAR IN CELL BIOLOGY. 
VMS 699 RESEARCH IN VETERINARY MEDICAL SCIENCES. 



202 



Wildlife Biology 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Master of Wildlife Biology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. L. Noble, Coordinator 

Professor D. L. Holley Jr., Director of Graduate Programs, Forestry 

Box 8002, (919) 515-2892 

Professor J. F. Gilliam, Director of Graduate Programs, Zoology 

Box 7617, (919) 515-2587 

Professors: G. T. Barthalmus, P. T. Bromley, B. J. Copeland, P. D. Doerr, J. E. 
Easley Jr., E. C. Franklin, R. A. Lancia, J. M. Miller, K. H. Pollock; Professors 
Emeriti: D. A. Adams, D. W. Hayne; Associate Professors: J. M. Hinshaw, R. G. 
Hodson, E. J. Jones, T. M. Losordo, S. C. Mozley, R. A. Powell, J. A. Rice, C. V. 
Sullivan; Assistant Professors: H. V. Daniels, M. J. Groom; Assistant Professors 
(USDI): J. A. Collazo, J. E. Hightower 

The wildlife biology degrees are offered through the fisheries and wildlife science 
program, an inter-college program administered by the Departments of Forestry and 
Zoology. The degrees eaaphasizje assessment, biology, ecology and management of fish 
and wildlife species and their habitats. 

Admissions Requirements: AppUcation for admission is made through the Departments 
of Forestry or Zoology. Miminum requirements include a graduate record examination 
score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative sections. Admission is contingent upon 
acceptance by an advisor. Exceptions to minimum requirements may be made for 
students with special backgrounds. 

Master's Degree Requirements: The Master of Wildlife Biology degree consists of a 
minimum of 36 credits, which may include up to eight hours of special problems and 
seminars. A professional paper is required. Further requirements may be imposed by 
the advisory committee and/or department. The M.S. degree program may include up 
to eight hours of re-search and seminars. A research-based thesis is required. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate research and teaching assistantships are offered 
for qualified students through participating departments. Commitments for assistantship>s 
are normally made at the time of admission to graduate study. 

Other Relevant Information: Research facihties near campus include the Aquatic 
Research Laboratory, Wildlife Research Laboratory, Biology Field Laboratory, Schenck 
Forest, Harris Lands natural area and several university farm imits. Off-campus re- 



203 



search is conducted at the Pamhco Aquaculture Center, research and extension centers 
in the east and west, and at facihties of state and federal agencies and private 
organizations. 

nRAniJATFS rnijRSsFS 

FW(ZO) 515 FISH PHYSIOLOGY. 

FW(ZO) 553 PRINCIPLES OF WILDLIFE SCIENCE. 

FW(ZO) 554 WILDLIFE FIELD STUDIES. 

FW(FOR) 585 ADVANCED WILDLIFE HABITAT MANAGEMENT. 

FW(ZO) 586 AQUACULTURE I. 

FW(ZO) 587 AQUACULTURE I LABORATORY. 

FW(FOR) 594 SEMINAR IN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. 

rOTmSFS FROM ASSOrTATFD DFPA1?TlVfFNTS 

ZOSOl ORNITHOLOGY. 

ZO(ST) 506 SAMPLING ANIMAL POPULATIONS. 

ZO(ENT) 509 ECOLOGY OF STREAM INVERTEBRATES 

Z0 519 LIMNOLOGY. 

ZO(MEA) 520 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

Z0 542 HERPETOLOGY. 

Z0 544 MAMMALOGY. 

ZO 593 AQUATIC ECOLOGY SEMINAR. 

Z0 619 ADVANCED LIMNOLOGY. 

ZO 621 FISHERY SCIENCE. 

ZO(MEA) 624 ECOLOGY OF FISHES. 

ZO 626 QUANTITATIVE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT. 

ZO 644 ADVANCED TOPICS IN THE STUDY OF MAMMALS. 

Wood and Paper Science 

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Wood and Paper Science 

THE GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. J. Thomas, Interim Head of the Department 
Professor Emeritus R. D. Gilbert, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 8005, (919) 515-5321 

EUs and Signe Olsson Professor and Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor: J. S. 

Gratzl 

Reuben B. Robertson Professor: H.-m. Chang 

Professors: J. Denig, J. A. Heitmann Jr., H. Jameel, T. W. Joyce, M. W. Kelly, H. 
G. Olf, E. A. Wheeler; Adjunct Professors: L. L. Edwards, T. K. Kirk; Professors 
EmerUi: A. C. Barefoot Jr., E. L. Deal Jr., E. L. Ellwood, C. A. Hart, I. S. 
Goldstein, R. G. Pearson; Associate Professor: J. P. Roise; Research Associate 

204 



Professors: J. S. Stewart; Adjunct Associate Professor: R. B. Phillips; Assistant 
Professors: B. Kasal, R. A. Venditti; Research Associate: C. L. Chen 

Course offerings and research facihties are available in the following areas: Wood 
chemistry, hgnin and carbohydrate chemistry, pulping chemistry, pollution abatement 
processes, polymer chemistry, fiber and paper properties, secondary fiber studies, wood 
{^ysics (especially wood hquid relations), wood anatomy, wood biology, wood mechan- 
ics and engineering, wood machining, manufacturing processes, wood-based industry 
economics and marketing. 

Admission Requirements: Requirements hsted here are in addition to graduate school 
requirements stated elsewhere. To be admitted, a student should have earned a B.S. 
degree with a major in wood and paper science or the equivalent. Graduates with other 
physical science or engineering baccalaureate degrees can be admitted but may be 
required to make up certain undergraduate deficiencies. Students with a 3.0 GPA and 
with appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission. 

Master of Science Degree Requirements: Jn addition to Graduate School requirements, 
a minor is required. 

Master of Wood and Paper Science Degree Requirements: The Master of Wood and 
Paper Science is a non-thesis, professional degree for students not interested in research, 
A minimum of 36 course credits is required. The regulations regarding credits are the 
same as for the M.S. degree except that up to 6 credits of 400-level courses in the major 
field may be included. A technical report which demonstrates the student's ability to 
gather, analyze and report information is required. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Jn addition to Graduate School requirements, Ph.D. 
candidates must present two seminars before their final oral examination will be 
arranged. 

Student Financial Support: A limited number of research assistantships are available. 

Other Relevant Ii\formation: Graduate students should select a chairman and other ad- 
visory committee members and submit a plan of graduate work by the end of their first 
semester of residence. They are also urged to take the qualifying examinations within 
one year of residence. The department beUeves M.S. and Ph.D. students should select 
a research topic and begin their thesis research as early as possible. 

As the field of wood and paper science is a derived science, considerable emphasis is 
placed upon developing a strong minor in the graduate program in any one or more of 
the supporting disciplines such as organic chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical engi- 
neering, mathematics, statistics, biology, engineering mechanics, mechanical engineer- 
ing, physics, and economics or business administration. 

205 



Students in wood chemistry and pulp and paper programs must pass certain qualifying 
examinations. 

r.RA nriA tf^ rnim^ER 

WPS 513 TROPICAL WOODS. 

WPS 515 SURFACE AND COLLOID CHEMISTRY OF PAPERMAKING. 

WPS 521 CHEMISTRY OF WOOD POLYSACCILUUDES. 

WPS 522 CHEMISTRY OF LIGNIN AND EXTRACTFVES. 

WPS 525 POLLUTION ABATEMENT IN FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES. 

WPS 533 ADVANCED WOOD ANATOMY. 

WPS 540 WOOD COMPOSITES. 

WPS 560 ADVANCED PULP AND PAPER PROCESS ANALYSIS. 

WPS 591 WOOD AND PAPER SCIENCE PROBLEMS. 

WPS 599 METHODS OF RESEARCH IN WOOD AND PAPER SCIENCE. 

WPS 604 TIMBER PHYSICS. 

WPS 625 WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE PAPER INDUSTRY. 

WPS 691 GRADUATE SEMINAR. 

WPS 693 ADVANCED WOOD AND PAPER SCIENCE PROBLEMS. 

WPS 699 PROBLEMS AND RESEARCH. 

Zoology 

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.S., Master of Life Sciences, Master of Wildlife Biology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. L. Grove, Interim Head of the Department, 
Professor J. F. Gilliam, Director of Graduate Programs 
Box 7617, (919) 515-2587, andrea_powell@ncsu.edu 

Professors: G. T. Barthabnus, P. C. Bradbury, P. T. Bromley, B. J. Copeland, P. 
D. Doerr, W. C. Grant, H. F. Heatwole, C. F. Lytle, J. M. Miller, R. L. Noble, J. 
F. Roberts, H. A. Underwood Jr., J. G.Vandenbergh, T. G. Wolcott.; Acfj'unct 
Professors: F. A. Cross, L. B. Crowder, J. D. Hair, D. E. Hoss, G. R. Huntsman, J. 
A. McLachlan, G. W. Thayer, J. R. Walters; Professors Emeriti: D. E. Davis, W. 
W. Hassler, D. W. Hayne, M. T. Huish, G. C. Miller, T. L. Quay, D. E. Smith; 
Associate Professors: B. L. Black, R. M. Grossfeld, J. M. Hinshaw, R. G. Hodson, 
T. M. Losordo, S. C. Mozley, M. N. Niedzlek-Feaver, R. A. Powell, J. A. Rice, C. 
V, SuUivan; Adjunct Associate Professor: C. S. Manooch DI; Assistant Professors: 
R. J. Borski, H. V. Daniels, M. J. Groom; Assistant Professors (USDI): J. A. 
CoUazo, J. E. Hightower, T. R. Simons 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM 

Professors: R. A. Lancia, K. H. Pollock; Associate Professor: E. J. Jones 



206 



Areas of study include: cell biology and physiology, ecology and behavior, and fisheries 
and wildlife biology. Specializations within these areas include developmental biology, 
invertebrate biology, animal reproduction, biorhythms, behavioral ecology, population 
ecology, conservation biology, wildlife field studies, aquaculture and many others. 

Admission Requirements: GRE scores (general and biology) are required for admission. 
Regular admission requires an undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 in an appropri- 
ate biological discipline. Some research exf>erience is highly recommended. 

Master's Degree Requirements: No more than 6 hours of temporary courses (ZO 592, 
ZO 692) or 2 hours of departmental seminar can be included in the 30-hour requirement 
for the M.S. Six hours of research credits (ZO 699) are required. A minor (usually 9-10 
hours) is required. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements: A student's advisory committee recommends appropri- 
ate courses which will provide a strong foundation in the student's area of interest. This 
typically includes 21-27 credit hours plus a minimum requirement of 10 hours of 
research (ZO 699). A minor (usually 9-10 hours) is required. 

Student Financial Support: Graduate teaching and research assistantships are available 
to well -qualified students. 

Other Relevant Ir\formation: Students may also pursue degrees in interdepartmental 
programs in physiology and ecology. Excellent research facihties, equipment and 
computers are available. Field work can be conducted at nearby natural areas and 
laboratory work at various state and federal laboratories associated with the department. 

GRAniJATE rniJRSES 

ZO501 ORNITHOLOGY. 

ZO(PHY)503 GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY I. 

ZO(PHY) 504 GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY II. 

ZO(ST) 506 SAMPLING ANIMAL POPULATIONS. 

ZO(END 509 ECOLOGY OF STREAM INVERTEBRATES. 

Z0 512 ANIMAL SYMBIOSIS. 

ZO(PHY) 513 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. 

ZO(FW)51S FISH PHYSIOLOGY. 

Z0 517 POPULATION ECOLOGY. 

Z0 519 UMNOLOGY. 

ZO(MEA) 520 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY. 

Z0 522 BIOLOGICAL CLOCKS. 

ZO(PHY,PO) 524 COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY 

ZO(MEA) 534 MARINE BENTHIC ECOLOGY. 

ZO(GN) 540 EVOLUTION. 

Z0 542 HERPETOLOGY. 

2W544 MAMMALOGY. 

ZO(FW) 553 PRINCIPLES OF WILDLIFE SCIENCE. 

ZO(FW)554 WILDUFE FIELD STUDIES. 



207 



ZO(MB)555 PROTOZOOLOGY. 

ZO(BO) 560 PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY. 

Z0 581 HELMINTHOLOGY. 

ZO(ENT) 582 MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY. 

ZO(FW) 586 AQUACULTURE I. 

ZO(FW)587 AQUACULTURE I LABORATORY. 

ZO 590 SPECIAL STUDIES. 

Z0 592 TOPICAL PROBLEMS. 

ZO 593 AQUATIC ECOLOGY SEMINAR. 

ZO(PHY) 595 SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION. 

Z0 614 ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY. 

ZO 618 COMMUNITY ECOLOGY. 

Z0 619 ADVANCED LIMNOLOGY. 

Z0 621 FISHERY SCIENCE. 

ZO(MEA) 623 ADVANCES IN MARINE COMMUNITY ECOLOGY. 

ZO(MEA) 624 ECOLOGY OF FISHES. 

ZO 626 QUANTITATIVE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT. 

ZO 644 ADVANCED TOPICS IN THE STUDY OF MAMMALS. 

ZO(BO) 660 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ECOLOGY I. 

ZO690 SEMINAR. 

Z0 691 TOPICS IN ANIMAL BEHAVIOR. 

ZO 692 SEMINAR IN EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY. 

Z0 699 RESEARCH IN ZOOLOGY. 



208 



MINOR AND OTHER ORGANIZED 
PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Anthropology 

nRAnriATK rnuRSFS 

ANT 508 CULTURE AND PERSONALITY. 
ANT 511 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY. 
ANT 512 APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY. 
ANT 591 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY. 

Artificial Intelligence (Minor Program) 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: R. C. Laio, W. J. Rasdorf, H. E. Schaffer, A. L. Tharp; Associate 
Professors: D. R. Bahler, H. D, Levin,, R. D. Rodman, E. T. Sanii; A(ijunct Assistant 
Professor: J. C. Sutton m 

Artificial intelligence is the branch of computer science concerned with designing 
con^xiter systems which exhibit the characteristics normally associated with intelligence 
in human behavior, such as understanding language, learning, reasoning, solving 
problems, and so on. At NC State, artificial intelligence is an interdisciplinary field, 
with faculty finom several departments ^igaged in fundamental research and apphcations. 

The university offers courses of study leading to a minor in artificial inteUigence as part 
of the M. S. and Hi.D. degrees. This option is available to all graduate students except 
those in computer science, who can choose artificial inteUigence as an interest area. 

To fiilfill the acadanic requirements for a minor in artificial inteUigence, each master's 
stud^it must successfully complete at least three, and each doctoral student at least six, 
of the courses in the artificial inteUigence curriculum. Two of the courses must be CSC 
511, Artificial hiteUigence I and CSC 611, Artificial LiteUigence 11. Other courses 
offered as part of the artificial iateUigence curriculum include: CSC 502 Computational 
Linguistics; CSC 602 Computational Semantics; ECE 659 Computer Vision; CSC 
(ECE,IE) 575 Voice Co mmuni cation Systems; CSC(ECE,IE) 675 Advances in Voice 
Input/Output Communication Systems. Also, from time to time special topics courses 
are offered covering subjects such as knowledge engineering, fiizzy reasoning, 
knowledge repres«itation, artificial inteUigence apphcations to CAD, and artificial iute- 
lligence in manufacturing. 



209 



Graduate students in computer science who select artificial intelligence as an interest 
area are subject to the same academic requirements that define other interest areas 
within computer science. 

Biological Sciences 

There is no separaie graduate major in the biological sciences, but both M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees are offered in several life science departments and programs of the College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. Also, non-thesis Master of Life Sciences degrees are 
offered by several departments and programs for students who wish to emphasize course 
work in a graduate program. Master of Life Sciences degrees may be appropriate for 
stud^its who are already woricing or plan to work in a professional capacity in business, 
industry or government agencies rather than to continue to the doctorate. These degrees 
are not necessarily terminal, however, and successful students may be able to proceed 
to other advanced degrees. Interdisciplinary courses apphcable to several graduate 
programs are offered by the Biological Sciences Interdepartmental Program. 

r.RAniiATF rnriRSF^ 

BIO 510 ADVANCED BIOLOGY FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. 

Biomedical Engineering (Minor Program) 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: C. F. Abrams, M. A. Ayoub, R. G. Carbonell, B. S. Gupta, J. J. Hren, C. 
Kleinstreuer, J. M. Mackenzie, T. K. Miller HI, H. T. Nagle Jr., A. A. Nilsson, 
D. F. OUis, H. G. Perros, S. A. Rajala, J. E. Smallwood, W. E. Snyder, 
L. Stikeleather, E. A. Stone, M. K. Stoskopf, D. E. Thrall, H. J. Trussell, T. G. 
Wolcott; Adjunct Professor: J. P. Archie; Professors Emeriti: F. M. Richardson, C. 
W. Suggs; Associate Professors: S. M. Blanchard, D. G. Bristol, R. D. Gould, L. C. 
Hudson, S. M. Hudson, R. E. Meyer, R. A. Powell, C. E. Smith, K. A. Spaulding; 
Assistant Professor: S. C. Roe; Adjunct Assistant Professor: P. Santago n 

The biomedical engineering program provides graduate minors under the direction of 
faculty from fourteen departments in the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, 
Engineering, Forest Resources, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Textiles and 
Veterinary Medicine at NC State. Faculty from the Biomedical Engineering Dej>art- 
TosDts at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are also 
actively involved. Graduate students from all departments may elect a biomedical 
aigineering minor. To fulfill the minor requirements, a student must take three courses 
in one of four specialty tracks: biomechanics, biofluids and biomaterials; biomedical 



210 



modeling and signal processing; instrumentation, sensors and telemetry; medical 
imaging and communications systems. 

The graduate faculty maintain lists of courses from which the students may make their 
selections. The particular choice of courses is left to the student and the student's 
advisoiy committee. A student may choose a minor outside one of the four tracks with 
the a^^jroval of the Biomedical Engineering Academic Affairs Committee. The courses 
for all biomedical engineering graduate minors must be distinctly different from the 
student's major field of study. 

Studaits who elect the biomedical ^igineering graduate minor are encouraged to engage 
in research activities that involve interactions with faculty and students in other 
departments and/or colleges. 

Biotechnology (Minor Program) 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor M. A. Conkling, Director 

Box 7512, (919) 515-4230, Fax (919) 151-4231, biotech@ncsu.edu 

Professors: K. B. Adler, P. F. Agris, W. F. Boss, R. G. Carbonell, P. B. Carter, H.- 
m. Chang, S. E. Curtis, M. E. Daub, V. L. DeBuysscher, W. J. Dobrogosz, E. J. 
Eisen, F. J. Fuller, C. K. Hall, B. B. Hammerberg, H. M. Hassan, T. W. Joyce, R. 
M. Kelly, T. R. Klaenhammer, C. S. Levings HI, P. K. Kilpatrick, R. J. Linderman, 
S. A. Lommel, T. Melton, W. L. Miller, D. F. OUis, P. E. Omdorff, R. M. Petters, 
M. A. Qureshi, J. F. Roberts, R. M. Roe, P. L. Sannes, J. G. ScandaUos, 
R. R. Sederoff, J. C. H. Shih, S. L. Spiker, H. T. Stalker, H. E. Swaisgood, C. S. 
Teng, E. C. Theil, W. F. Thompson, W. A. F. Tompkins, B. S. Weir; Professor 
(USDA): P. E. Bishop; Associate Professors: B. Alston-Mills, H. V. Amerson, M. T. 
Andrews, R. S. Boston, E. F. Bowden, T. J. Hoban IV, L. K. Hanley-Bowdoin, P. B. 
Lindgrai, E. S. Maxwell, E. S. Miller, C. H. Opperman, S. M. Peretti, B. Sherry, R. 
C. Smart, A.-M. Stomp, M. B. Tompkins, S. L. Tonkonogy, A. K. Weissinger; 
Associate Professor (USDA): P. H. Sisco; Assistant Professors: R. E. Dewey, C. E. 
Farin,, C. L. Hemenway, J. N. Petitte, I. T. D. Petty, D. Robertson 

The Biotechnology Program includes faculty from twenty departments in the Colleges 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering, Forest Resources, Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences, and Veterinary Medicine. Graduate study leading to a 
Ph.D. minor in biotechnology may be taken by students who reside and conduct their 
research in one of the participating departments. To obtain a minor in biotechnology, 
the student must successfully complete at least six credit hours in the laboratory core 



211 



courses selected from the list below and must conduct graduate thesis research in an 
area of biotechnology. 

Research in biotechnology is focused in three main areas: recombinant DNA technol- 
ogy, bioprocessing/bioanalytical techniques, and in vitro culture techniques. The multi- 
disciplinary nature of biotechnology means that a wide range of research topics and 
techniques are appUcable, such as molecular level genetics and associated research in 
molecular biology, enzyme technology and protein engineering, bioprocessing using 
cells or aizymes, development of biosensors, hybridoma technology, cell culture tech- 
niques and embryo manipulation. 

nRAPriATF rnriRSsF^ 

BIT 660 CORE TECHNOLOGIES IN MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY. 
BIT 697 ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY. 

rnriR^FS from A^^nri ate departmentr 

ANS 606 ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY: EMBRYO MANIPULATION. 

BCH 552 EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY. 

CS(BO,GN,HS) 547 CELL AND TISSUE TECHNIQUES IN PLANT BREEDING. 

FS504 FOOD PROTEINS AND ENZYMES. 

GN 666 LABORATORY IN MOLECULAR GENETICS. 

MB 660 EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIAL GENETICS. 

Business Management (Minor Program) 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. W. Wilson, Head 

Professor S. G. Allen, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: R. L. Clark, G. W. Dickson, C. P. Jones, D. K. Pearce; Associate 
Professors: A. Agrawal, D. L. Baimier, S. N. Chapman, J. C. Dutton Jr., E. A. 
McDermed, K. Mitchell, A. Padilla, J. C, Poindexter Jr.; Assistant Professors: C. C. 
Bozarth, K. S. Davis, S. K. Markham, M. Montoya-Weiss, P. Mulvey, K. Schenk, G. 
B. Voss, G. S. Young 

The department offers a graduate minor in business management. Students enrolled in 
master's programs other than the Master of Science in Management may earn a minor 
by successfully completing nine hours of courses in the department at the 500 or 600 
level. For a listing of courses in business management, see management. 



212 



Communication 

GRAnUATE rnuR^FS 

COM 552 HUMAN COMMUNICATION THEORY. 

COM 556 SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION. 

COM 566 SEMINAR IN CRISIS COMMUNICATION. 

COM 598 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN COMMUNICATION. 

COM(ENG) 622 THE RHETORIC OF WRITTEN DISCOURSE. 

COM(ENG)623 RHETORICAL CRITICISM: THEORY AND PRACTICE. 

COM 698 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION. 

Computational Engineering and Sciences (Minor Program) 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. J, Turinsky, Program Coordinator 

Professors: D. P. Agrawal, W. E. Alexander, H. T. Banks, J. Bernholc, S. 
R. Cotanch, R. E. Funderlic, C. K. Hall, C. Kleinstreuer, D. F. McAllister, D. S. 
McRae, T. K. Miller m, G. E. Mitchell, J. F. Monahan, H. G. Perros, R. O. 
Scattergood, W. J. Stewart, M. H. Whangbo, R. E. White, J. L. Whitten; Associate 
Professors: J. W. Baugh, D. W. Brenner, J. M. Doster, J. E. Franke, E. F. Gehringer, 
C. R. Ji, S. E. Koch, Y.-L. Lin, M. A. Vouk 

The Computational Engineering and Sciences Program includes faculty from twelve 
departments in the College of Engineering and College of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences. Graduate students pursuing graduate study toward a master's or Ph.D. degree 
in one of the jjarticipating science or engineering departments may elect this program 
in place of the traditional minor. [Note that students wishing to earn a graduate degree 
in mathematics or con^xiter science should reference these departments' sections of the 
Graduate Catalog for details on options available in computational mathematics and 
scientific computing.] To complete the program requirements, a student must 
successfully complete a sequence of graduate-level apphed mathematics and computer 
science courses and, if a research dissertation is required, utilize advanced 
computational techniques in the course of conducting the research. 

The Computational Engineering and Sciences Program is designed to efficiently prejmre 
graduate students to undertake research utilizing scientific computing by combining 
course work in apphed mathematics and computer science in addition to course work 
in the traditional major. The program recognizes that a new area of scientific pursuit, 
numerical simulation, has emerged as a new paradigm for scientific inquiry 
complementing theory and laboratory experiment. Typical areas of research include, but 
are not limited to, computational fluid dynamics, quantum chemistry and atmospheric 



213 



modelling. Admission to the program is gained after enrollment in the Graduate School 
aai the graduate program is underway. Program course requirements are selected from 
applied mathematics and computer science courses Usted elsewhere in this Graduate 
Catalog. To facihtate the satisfaction of prerequisite requirements for graduate-level 
computer science courses, CSC 489 is offered for graduate credit, combining the key 
contents of several imdergraduate courses. Typical courses that may be selected to 
satisfy this program's requirements include advanced calculus, numerical analysis, 
numerical linear algebra for parallel architectures, stochastic simulation, computer 
operating systems, digital systems architecture, computer graphics, compiler 
construction, software engineering, and design and analysis of algorithms. 

Design 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see architecture, graphic 
design, industrial design and landscape architecture. 

nRADUATF rnuR^E 

DN 611 ADVANCED VISUAL LABORATORY. 

Ecology 

nRADUATE rnriR^FS 

ECO 690 ECOLOGY SEMINAR. 

ECO 693 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ECOLOGY. 

Education [General Courses] 

nRAnuATF. rnriR^F 

ED 597 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION. 

Engineering [General Courses] (Designed for use by graduate students in any 
department in the College of Engineering.) 

GRAnrjATF rnuR^F^ 

E(MA,OR) 531 DYNAMIC SYSTEMS AND MULTIVARIABLE CONTROL I. 
E(MA,OR) 631 DYNAMIC SYSTEMS AND MULTIVARIABLE CONTROL IL 



214 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. H. Stewart, Head of the Department 

Professors: G. F. Gonzalez, J. R. Kelly, G. G. Smith, M. A. F. Witt; Professors 
Emeriti: A. A. Gonzalez, M. Paschal, G. W. Poland, E. M. Stack; Associate 
Professors: R. M. A. Alder, S. G.-Q. Alonso, W. M. Holler, M. M. Magill, 
A. C. Malinowski, L. Mykyta, M. L. Salstad, S. E. Simonsen, M. L. Sosower; 
Associate Professor Emeritus: H. Tucker Jr.; Assistant Professors: V. Bilenkin, H. G. 
Braunbeck, G. A. Dawes, D. M. Marchi, J. P. Mertz, G. Williams 

The Departmait of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers courses to assist graduate 
students in preparing to use modem foreign languages in research and advanced 
study. These courses are not open to undergraduates. With special permission of the 
Graduate School, certification may be obtained in languages not normally taught by the 
department. 

The following courses are designed to be audited, and credits do not apply toward 
advanced degrees. 

FLF 401 FRENCH FOR GRADUATE STUDEf^S. 
FLG401 GERMAN FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS. 
FLS 401 SPANISH FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Graduate School 

The following registration categories may be used, when appropriate, by students in all 
graduate programs. Students registered in one of these categories are not permitted to 
register for any other courses during the same semester. 

GR5%S MASTER'S SUMMER RESEARCH. 

GR 597 MASTER'S EXAMINATION ONLY. 

GR 598 MASTER'S THESIS PREPARATION ONLY. 

GR 695 DOCTORAL PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION ONLY. 

GR696S DOCTORAL SUMMER RESEARCH. 

GR 697 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 

GR 698 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION PREPARATION. 



215 



Pest Management 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: J. T. Ambrose, C. S. Apperson, R. C. Axtell, J. S. Bacheler, J. E. Bailey, 
M. K. Baite, J. R. Bradley Jr., R. L. Brandenburg, W. M. Brooks, R. I. Bruck, G. A. 
Carlson, H. D. Coble, F. T. Corbin, J. M. Davis, E. J. Dunphy, F. Gould, 
F. P. Hain, G. G. Kennedy, W. M. Lewis, H. M. Linker, L. D. King, J. R. Meyer, 
T. J. Monaco, M. M. Peet, D. P. Schmitt, W. A. Skroch, P. S. Southern, R. E. 
Stinner, T. B. Sutton, J. W. Van Duyn; Professor (USDA): R. A. Reinert; Adjunct 
Professor: J. J. Arends 

The conc^ of integrated pest managanent (IPM) combines the theoretical and practical 
aspects of cultural, biological and chemical control into effective systems that maintain 
pest populations at levels that minimiz e economic and environmental damage. This 
approach and its implementation are opening new career opportunities for broadly 
informed individuals who imderstand the basic biology and ecology of pests and the 
systems with which they are associated. 

Graduate study in integrated pest management draws upon faculty from several 
departments, especially plant pathology, entomology, crop science and horticultural 
Sciaice. Each student's advisory committee must include a member of the IPM graduate 
faculty. Additional information may be obtained by contacting a member of the IPM 
Graduate Faculty or the Director, Office of Academic Programs, 115 Patterson Hall, 
Box 7642, North CaroUna State University, Raleigh, North CaroUna 27695-7642. 

Students are advised to review course listings in such relevant departments as animal 
sciaice, crop sciaice, economics and business, entomology, horticultural science, plant 
pathology, soil science, the biomathematics program and the College of Forest 
Resources. 



Philosophy 

nRADUATF rnuR^Fs: 

PHI(PSY) 525 INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE SCIENCE. 

PHI 588 ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHILX)SOPHY. 

PHI 691 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHILOSOPHY. 



216 



Plant Physiology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Visiting Professor T. W. Rufty Jr. , Coordinator 
Box 7619, (919) 515-2644 

Professors: W. F. Boss, R. S. Boston, W. S. Chilton, M. A. Conkling, F. T. Corbin, 
R. C. Fites, J. S. Huang, C. S. Levings IE, M. M. Peet, D. M. Pharr, C. D. Raper Jr., 
E. C. Sisler, S. L. Spiker, W. F. Thompson, R. J. Volk; Professors (USDA): E. L. 
Fiscuc, S. C. Huber, D. W. Israel, R. F. Wilson; Associate Professors: H. V. 
Amerson, D. C. Bowman, S. D. Clouse, R. Wells; Associate Professors (USDA): 
K. O. Burkey, D. P. Livingston IE, M. G. Redinbaugh Assistant Professors: G. P. 
Fenner, D. Robertson 

The plant physiology program is an interdepartmental offering. Although not a formal 
degree jirogram, students may elect to major or minor in the plant physiology program 
at both the M. S. and Ph.D. levels. Students entering the program should have 
appropriate knowledge in plant biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics. Some 
formal training in genetics, physical chemistry and statistics is normally expected. 

When majoring in plant physiology, students will be closely affihated with the same 
department as their major professor. As such, they will be required to meet respective 
departmental requirements for teaching, written and oral examinations, and seminar 
attendance. Departments currently participating in this program are: biochemistry, 
botany, crop science, forestry, genetics, horticultural science, plant pathology and soil 
science. The chair or co-chair of the student's advisory committee must be a member 
of the Plant Physiology Faculty. 

The program is administered by the Plant Physiology Executive Committee. Additional 
information about the program may be obtained by writing to one of the listed faculty 
members or to the coordinator. 

The purpose of the plant physiology curriculum is to ensure that students obtain substan- 
tive understanding of the physiological processes controlling plant behavior. The cur- 
riculum is composed of two groups of courses listed below. Requirements are subject 
to modification as the plant physiology discipline evolves and as new courses are 
developed. 

Group T (Required) 

BO 551 ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY I 
BO 552 ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY II 
BO 580 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 



217 



Grniip TT (At least two are required) 

BO 590C TOPICAL PROBLEMS: PLANT CELL BIOLOGY 

BCH 553 METABOLISM AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 

BCH 601 MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURE 

BCH 603 MACROMOLECULAR SYOTIIESIS AND REGULATION 

BCH 605 MOLECULAR BILOGY OF THE CELL 

Political Science and Public Administration 

Professor M. S. Soroos, Head of the Department 

For listings of graduate faculty and information about the two programs, see the 
pohtical science section and the pubUc administration section. 

Solid State Sciences (Minor Program) 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

University Professor G. Lucovsky, Chair 

Professors: K. J. Bachmann, S. M. Bedair, J. Bemholc, R. F. Davis, R. E. Fomes, 
J. R. Hauser, J. J. Hroi, M. A. Littlejohn, R. M. Kolbas, J. Narayan, R. J. Nemanich, 
M. A. Paesler, G. Rozgonyi, P. E. Russell, D. E. Sayers, J. F, Schetzina, 
A. F. Schreiner, E. O. Stejskal, M. H. Whangbo, J. J. Wortman 

The university offers courses of study leading to a minor in soUd state sciences as part 
of the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees. This option is available to all graduate students 
pursuing research in the broad area of solid state science and requires that a member of 
the soUd state sciences faculty serve on the student's research committee. 

Solid state sciences is an interdisciplinary area of research that appUes and extends 
concqjts from the traditional academic disciplines of chemistry, electrical and computer 
engineering, materials science and engineering, and physics to basic and appUed 
problems with a primary focus on soUd state materials. At NC State, there are a 
significant number of such research programs that involve faculty and students in more 
than one of the academic departments hsted above. This minor program can be 
customized to provide a course complement for these ongoing programs, as well as for 
any additional schd state materials research programs as they are initiated, developed 
and implemented. 

To fulfill the academic requirements for a minor in solid state sciences, each master's 
studait must successfully complete at least three, and each doctoral student, four of the 
courses in the solid states sciences curriculum. A partial Usting of courses in this 
program includes: CH 501, 503 Advanced Liorganic Chemistry I, 11; CH 531, 631 



218 



Chemical Thennodynamics I, 11; CH 533 Chemical Kinetics; CH 537 Quantum 
Chonistry; ECE 530 Physical Electronics; ECE 539 Integrated Circuit Technology and 
Fabrication; ECE 623 Optical Properties of Semiconductors; ECE 624 Electronic 
Properties of Sohd State Devices; ECE (PY) 627 Semiconductor Thin Films 
Technology; MAT 512 Scanning Electron Microscopy; MAT 515 Fundamentals of 
Transmission Electron Microscopy; MAT 560 Materials Science and Processing of 
Semiconductor Devices; MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments; MAT 612 
Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy and Surface Analysis; MAT 660 Defects, 
Diffusion and Ion Implantation in Semiconductors; MAT 692 Advanced Topics in 
Materials Science and Engineering; PY (ECE) 552, 553 Introduction to the Structure 
of Solids I, n. In addition, other courses (for example, special topics courses in any one 
of the participating departments) may also be substituted into an individual student's 
designated sohd state sciences minor program at the discretion of his/her committee. 

Water Resources 

Minor Program 

WATER RESOURCES COMMITTEE 

J. D. Gregory, Chair 

Box 8002, (919) 515-7567, E-mail: jim_gregory@ncsu.edu 

J. E. Parsons (Biological and Agricultural Engineering), J. M. Burkholder (Botany), M. 
R. Overcash (Chemical Engineering), W. S. GaUer (Civil Engineering), J. B. Weber 
(Crop Science), R. B. Palmquist (Economics), F. P. Hain (Entomology), R. E. Carawan 
(Food Sciaice), S. R. Raval (Landscape Architecture), D. G. Evans (Marine, Earth and 
Atmospheric Sciaices), J. W. Gilliam (Soil Science), C. B. Smith (Textile Engineering, 
Chemistry and Science), T. W. Joyce (Wood and Paper Science), S. C. Mozley 
(Zoology) 

The graduate minor in water resources is an interdisciplinary, interdepartmenal minor 
that is designed to provide a specialization in water resources for students who are 
majoring in the many disciplines of natural resources, engineering, technology and 
social sciences that are related to or involve water management. The ever-increasing 
demands of good water management ia all elements of our society continue the need for 
well-trained professionals in water resources. Such professionals should have a strong 
grounding in a major discipline coupled with a broad understanding of and appreciation 
for the complex physical, biological, and social aspects of water resources management. 
The graduate miiwr in water resources will expose students to several different courses 
and faculty members in water resources that are outside his/her major field of study. 



219 



A graduate student may enroll in the water resources minor by including it on the plan 
of graduate work. A graduate faculty member from outside the student's major 
department or program must be appointed to serve as the minor representative on 
his/her advisory committee. The minor representative may be a member of the Water 
Resources Committee or another faculty member from a department represented on the 
Water Resources Committee who is active in teaching/research related to water 
resources. The minimum course requirements for a graduate minor in water resources 
are described below. 

Master's Degree —Three courses (minimum of eight credit hours) from water resources 
areas outside the student's major field of study approved by the student's minor 
r^jresentative. Doctor of Philosophy Degree —Three courses (minimum of eight credit 
hours) from water resources areas outside the student's major field of study approved 
by the student's minor representative. These courses shall be in addition to those 
previously taken at the master's level when that degree included a water resources 
minor. Recommended Course— A course in the legal, institutional, or economic aspects 
of water resources recommended for each minor program. 

A water resources minor will normally be composed of courses from the hst below. 
The student may select one or more courses from several subject areas or concentrate 
all courses in one area. Other courses that are water resources-oriented may be included 
whai ^>proved by the student's minor representative. Such courses may be: (1) Other 
NC State University courses; (2) Transfer courses from other institutions; (3) Courses 
taken through Literinstitutional Registration at Duke University and the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Additional information on appropriate courses may be 
obtained from any member of the Water Resources Committee. 

Requests for information on water resources-oriented graduate programs should be 
directed to the departments represented on the Water Resources Committee. For addi- 
tional information on the water resources minor, contact the chair of the committee. 

WATFR PFS OTTRrFS rOTTR^sFS 

Legal, Institutional and Economic Aspects of Water Resources 

FOR 472 RENEWABLE RESOURCE POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 

EC 436 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 

ECG 515 ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE POLICY 

PA 520 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY 

Planning of Water Resources and Related Systems 

CE 504 WATER TRANSPORTATION 

CE 575 MODELING &. ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS 

FOR 584 THE PRACTICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT 

LAR512 LANDSCAPE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

LAR 530 ADVANCED SITE PLANNING 



220 



Municipal and Industrial Water Management 

CE484 WATER SUPPLY AND WASTEWATER SYSTEMS 

CE571 THEORY OF WATER AND WASTE TREATMENT 

CE 572 DESIGN OF WATER AND WASTEWATER FACILITIES 

CHE 598 WASTE MINIMIZATION 

T(TC,TAM) 401 ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY 

WPS 460 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN THE PAPER INDUSTRY 

WPS 525 POLLUTION ABATEMENT IN FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES 

WPS 625 WASTEWATER TREAT. PAPER INDUSTRY 

Agricultural and Forest Water Management 

BAE 471 LAND RESOURCES ENVIRON. ENGINEERING 

BAE 472/572 IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE 

BAE 578 AGRICULTURAL WASTE MANAGEMENT 

FOR 401 WATERSHED AND WETLANDS HYDROLOGY 

SSC 461 SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND PLANT GROWTH 

SSC511 SOIL PHYSICS 

SSC 562 ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF SOIL SCIENCE 

Biological and Ecological Aspects of Water Resources 

BO(ZO) 560 PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY 

BO 574 PHYCOLOGY 

BO 590F THE ECOLOGY OF FRESHWATER PLANTS 

MEA(ZO) 520 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY 

Z0 441 BIOLOGY OF FISHES 

ZO(FW) 420 FISHERY SCIENCE 

ZO 460 AQUATIC NATURAL HISTORY LABORATORY 

ZO (ENT) 509 ECOLOGY OF STREAM INVERTEBRATES 

Z0 519 LIMNOLOGY 

ZO (FW) 586 AQUACULTURE I 

ZO (FW) 587 AQUACULTURE I LABORATORY 

ZO 593 AQUATIC ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Hydrologic, Meteorologic, Oceanographic, and Water Quality Aspects of Water Resources 

BAE 473 INTRODUCTION TO SURFACEAVATER QUALITY MODEL 

BAE(SSQ 671 THEORY OF DRAINAGE-SATURATED FLOW 

BAE(SSC) 674 THEORY OF DRAINAGE--UNSATURATED FLOW 

CE 574 CHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS I 

CE580 FLOW IN OPEN CHANNELS 

CE582 COASTAL HYDRODYNAMICS 

CE 583 ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF COASTAL PROCESSES 

CE 584 HYDRAULICS OF GROUNDWATER 

CE585 URBAN STORMWATER MANAGEMENT 

CE 586 ENGINEERING HYDROLOGY 

CE 644 GROUND WATER CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT 

FOR 501 WATERSHED HYDROLOGY 

MEA 455 MICROMETEOROLOGY 

MEA 481 PRINCIPLES OF GEOMORPHOLOGY 

MEA 555 METEOROLOGY OF THE BIOSPHERE 

MEA 560 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY 

MEA 561 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY 

MEA 565 HYDROGEOLOGY 

MEA 566 HYDROLGEOLOGY OF GROUNDWATER POLLUTION AND PROTECTION 

MEA 569 THE PHYSICAL DYNAMICS OF ESTUARIES 

MEA 571 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY 

MEA 574 BIOGEOCHEMISTRY 



221 



GRADUATE FACULTY* 

Abbate, Angelo Rudy, M.L.A., Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Abrams, Charlie Frank, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Abt, Robert C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Adams, David Arthur, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Adams, Dewey Allen, Ed.D., Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Adams, John Peter, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Food Science. 

Adams, William M., V.M.D., Professor Emeritus of Veterinary Medicine. 

Ade, Harald, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Physics. 

Adler, Kenneth B., Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences and Radiology and 

Toxicology. 

Afify, Elsayed M., Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Agrawal, Anup, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Agrawal, Dharma Prakash, D.Sc, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Agris, Paul F., Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry. 

Ahmad, Shuaib Haroon, Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Akroyd, H. Duane, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Adult and Community College EducaUon. 

Alder, Ruth M. Ayend, Ri.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Alexander, Samuel Thomas, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Alexander, Winser E., Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Allen, Howard Lee, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Allen, Janice Benson, Hi.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Anatomy, Riysiology, and Radiology. 

Allen, Jonathan C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Allen, Nina Stromgren, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Allen, Steven G., Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Almond, Glen W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Alonso, Silvia Gonzalez-Quevedo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Alston-Mills, Brenda P., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Alvarez, Raul, Professor Emeritus of Industrial Engineering. 

Ambrose, John Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Amein, Michael, Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Amerson, Henry Van, Ri.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Amiran, Eyal Yosef, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Amoozegar, Aziz, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Anderson, Charles Eugene, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Anderson, Clifton A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Industrial Engineering. 

Anderson, James Alan, Ph.D., Professor of Counselor Education. 

Anderson, John R., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Anderson, Kenneth E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Anderson, Kevin Lindsay, Ph.D., Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Anderson, Marshall W., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Anderson, Norman Dean, Ph.D.. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Anderson, Ruth D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication. 

Andrews, Matthew T., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Aneja, Viney P., Ph.D., Research Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

' Membership in the Graduate Faculty may be in either of two categories: (l)jull status or (2) associate 
status. Full status permits a faculty member to engage in any and all phases of the graduate programs 
of the University. Associate members may teach courses at the graduate level and serve as chair of 
master's advisory committees. 



Ill 



Anholt, Robert Rene Henri, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Apperson, Charles Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Apple, Jay Lawrence, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology 

Arasu, Prema, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Archie, Joseph Patrick,, Jr., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Arends, James Jay, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Entomology. 

Argenzio, Robert Alan, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Armstrong, Frank Bradley, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry. 

Armstrong, Jeffrey Dyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Arnold, John F., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Aronson, Arthur L., Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Arya, Satya Pal Singh, Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Ash, Sarah Liberman, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Aspnes, David E., Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Atchley, William R., Mi.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Genetics. 

Atkins, Clarke E., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Atkinson, Maxine P., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Attarian, Aram, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Aubrecht, Lyn G., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Auciello, Orlando, Adjunct Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Aurand, Leonard William, Ki.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Austin, David F., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Austin, William Wyatt, Jr., Rj.D., Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Averre, Charles Wilson, ID, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Awa, Vishnu S., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty in Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Axtell, Richard Charles, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Aycock, Robert, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Ayoub, Mahmoud Amin, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Azmy, Yousry R., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Bacheler, Jack S., Ki.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Bachmann, Klaus Jurgen, Ph.D., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Bahler, Dennis R., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Bai, Stephen A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Bailey, Douglas A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Bailey, Jack Eugene, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Bailey, John Albert, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Bailey, Kermit Lavon, M.P.D., Assistant Professor of Graphic Design. 

Baines, Barbara Joan, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Baird, Jack Vernon, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Baker, George A., m, Ed.D., Joseph D. Moore Distinguished Professor of Adult and Community 

College Education. 

Baker, James Robert, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Baker, Sunley B., Ph.D., Professor of Counselor Education. 

Baker- Ward, Lynne Elizabeth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Bakst, Murray R., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Poultry Science. 

Baliga, B. Jayant, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Balik, Charles Maurice, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Ball, David Stafford, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Ball, Hershell Ray, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Ballinger, Walter Elmer, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 



223 



Ballington, James Ralph, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Banker, James Roderick, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Banks, Harvey Thomas, Ph.D., Drexel Professor and University Professor of Mathenutics. 

Banks-Lee, Pamela, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Baran, Mesut Ethem, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Barfoercheck, Mary E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Barclay, William John, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Barefoot, Aldos Cortez, Jr., D.F., Professor Emeritus of Liberal Studies. 

Barker, James Cathey, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Barker, Kenneth Reece, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Barker, Roger Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Barkley, Key Lee, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Barlaz, Morton A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Barnes, Donald Warren, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Architecture. 

Barnes, Harold John, Ph.D., Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Bamett, Ortus Webb, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Bamhardt, Robert Alexander, Ed.D., Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Barr, Steve H., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Barrax, Gerald W., M.A., Professor of English. 

Barrick, EllioQ Ray, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Bartelt, Dana A., M.P.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Barthalmus, George Timothy, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Bartholomew, William Victor, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Bartley, Jon W., Ph.D., Professor of Accounting. 

Batchelor, Peter, M.C.P., Professor of Architecture. 

Bateman, Durward P., Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Batra, Subhash K., Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Batte, Edward Guy, D.V.M., Professor Emeritus of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Baugh, John Wesley, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Baughman, Gerald Robert, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Baum, Gary A., Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Baumer, David L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Bayoumi, Abdel E., Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Beasley, David Beach, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Beasley, Mark S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Beck, Keith R., Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Beckmann, Robert L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Bedair, Salah Mohamed, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Beers, Burton Floyd, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Beezer, Bruce Gerald, Ed.D., Professor of Educational Leadership and Program Evaluation. 

Beghin, John Christopher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Behlow, Robert Frank, D.V.M., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Behnke, Wallace P., B.S., Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

Beichner, Robert, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Beith, Barry H , Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Bell, Thomas Alexander, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Benson, David Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Benson, Geoffrey Alan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Benson, Ray Braman, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Bentley, Peter John, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Bereman, Robert Deane, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 



224 



Berenson, Sarah Burke, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Berger, Roger L., Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Berger, Vicki L., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of History. 

Bergmann, Ben A., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Berkhoff, Herman A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Berkstresser, Gordon Abbott,, m, Ph.D., Professor of Textile and Apparel Managentent. 

Bemhard, Richard Harold, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Bemholc, Jerzy, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Bemold, Leonhard E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Berry, ClifTord R., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Berschneider, Helen M., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Betts, Leonidas Judd, Jr., Ed.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Beute, Marvin Kenneth, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Bevier, Diane E., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 

Bevis, Michael Graeme, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Bhattacharyya, Bibhuti Bhushan, Ph.D., Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor of Statistics. 

Bilbro, Griff Luhrs, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Con^juter Engineering. 

Bilderback, Theodore Eugene, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Bilenkin, Vladimir, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Bingham, Marcia Y., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Bingham, William Louis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Bireline, George Lee, M.A., Professor Emeritus of Design. 

Bishir, John William, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Bishop, Paul Edward, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Microbiology. 

Bitting, Paul F., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Bitzer, Donald Lester, Ph.D., Distinguished University Research Professor of Computer Science. 

Bizios, Georgia, M.Arch., Professor of Architecture. 

Black, Betty Lynne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Blair, Neal Edward, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Blake, Carl Thomas, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Blanchard, Susan Manning, Ri.D., Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Bland, George F., M.S., Associate Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Blank, Gary B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Blank, Philip Everett, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Blankenship, Sylvia M., Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Blauvelt, Andrew K., M.F.A., Associate Professor of Graphic Design. 

Blazich, Frank Arthur, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Block, William Joseph, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Blondin, John M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Bloomfield, Peter, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Blum, Udo, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Blumer, Thomas Nelson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Bogdan, John Francis, B.T., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Boles, Michael A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Bond, James Anthony, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Toxicology. 

Bonham, Julia C, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of History. 

Boone, Edgar John, Ph.D., Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Boorman, Gary Alexis, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and 

Parasitology. 

Boos, E>ennis Dale, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Borden, Robert C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 



225 



Boiden, Roy H., Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Borski, Russell J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Boss, Charles Ben, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Boss, Wendy Farmer, Ph.D., Professor of BoUny. 

Bostian, Carey Hoyt, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Genetics. 

Bostick, George W., Jr., Ed.D., Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Boston, Rebecca S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Bottcher, Robert William, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Bourham, Mohamed A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Bowden, Edmond Francis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chenustry. 

Bowen, Henry Dittimus, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Bowen, Lawrence Hoffman, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Bowers, Crowell Gattis, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Bowman, Daniel Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Bowman, Daryl Thomas, Hi.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Bowman, Karl Frederick, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Boyd, Leon C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Boyette, Michael Doyle, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Bozarth, Cecil C, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Bradbury, Phyllis Clarke, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Bradley, Julius Roscoe, Jr., Ki.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Bradshaw, Lynn K., Ed.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Program 

Evaluation. 

Braham, Richard R., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Braham, Roscoe R., Hi. D., Scholar in Residence in Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Brake, John Thomas, Hi.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Bramlett, David L., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Branch, Stacy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Toxicology. 

Brandenburg, Rick Lynn, Hi.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Brandt, Jon A., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Branson, Bruce C, Hi.D., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Braunbeck, Helga Gerlinde, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Breitschwerdt, Edward Bealmear, D.V.M., Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Brenner, Donald W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Breuhaus, Babetta Ann, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Brewer, Holly, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Hi.story. 

Brglez, Franc, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Brickley, James John, Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Bridgwater Jr., Floyd Emmitt, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Forestry. 

Brill, Earl Downey, Jr., Hi.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Brim, Charles Aloysius, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Brisson, Robert Curtis, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Bristol, David G., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Britt, Jack Haiden, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Bromley, Peter T., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Brookins, Craig C, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Brooks, Robert Charles, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Brooks, Wayne Maurice, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Brookstein, David S., Sc.D., Adjunct Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Broome, Stephen White, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Brothers, Gene LeRoy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 



226 



Brown, Alvin Blake, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Brown, Henry Seawell, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Brown, J. David, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Brown, James W., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Microbiology. 

Brown, Marvin Luther, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History. 

Brown, Talmage T., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Brown, William E., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

Brownie, Cavell, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Brownie, Cecil F., Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Bruck, Robert Ian, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Bruneau, Arthur Henry, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Bryan, Robert Sedgwick, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Religion. 

Bryant, Charles Douglas, Ed.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Occupational Education. 

Bryden, Wayne L., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Poultry Science. 

Buchanan, David R., Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Buckless, Frank Alan Orth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting. 

Buckner, Sally B., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Buford, Marilyn A., Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Forestry. 

Bull, Leonard Seth, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Bullerwell, Arthur C, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

Bullock, Robert Cozart, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Bumgardner, Carl Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Bunch, Susan Elizabeth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Bunn, Linda Flowers, Ph.D., Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Buol, Stanley Walter, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor and Graduate Alunrmi Distinguished 

Professor of Soil Science. 

Burke, J. Richard, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Burkey, Kent Oliver, Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Burkholder, JoAnn M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Bumiston, Ernest Edmund, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Bums, Joseph Charles, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Bums, Robert Paschal, Jr., M.Arch., Professor of Architecture. 

Burrow, James L., Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Bumis, Barri Braddy, Ki.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Burt, Millard Paylor, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Adult and Community College Education. 

Burton, James D., Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Burton, Joseph William, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Burton, Ralph Ashby, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Businger, Steven, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Butcher, Kenneth Roy, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Caddell, Joseph William, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of History. 

Cahoon, Lawrence B., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Marine, Earth 

and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Caldwell, Billy E., Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Camp, Leon Raymond, Ph.D., Professor of Communication. 

Campbell, Charles Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Campbell, Kenneth Stoddard, B.S., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and 

Science. 

Campbell, Malcolm Matheson, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Campbell, Robert George, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry. 



227 



Campbell, Stephen Lavern, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
Campbell, William Vemon, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 
Canada, John Robert, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Industrial Engineering. 
Candler, Graham V., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering. 

Cannon, Thomas Franklin, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 
Carawan, Roy Eugene, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 
Carbonell, Ruben G., Ph.D., Hoechst-Celanese Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Carlson, Dale R., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 
Carlson, Gerald A., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
Carlton, Charles Hope, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
Carmichael, Halbert Hart, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Carpenter, William Lester, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Extension Education. 
Carroll, Daniel Edward, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 
Carroll, John W., Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Kiilosophy and Religion. 

Carter, George L., Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Adult and Community College Education. 
Carter, Glenda Stephens, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 
Carter, Michael P., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Carter, Philip Brian, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 
Carter, Thomas Ames, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 
Carter, Thomas E., Jr., Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 
Carter, William Randolph, Hi.D., Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 
Caruolo, Edward Vitangelo, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 
Cashion, Jerry Clyde, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of History. 
Cassel, Donald Keith, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Cates, David Marshall, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 
Catignani, George L., Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Cattley, Russell C, V.M.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and 
Parasitology. 

Cavaroc, Victor Viosca, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 
Caves, Thomas Courtney, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Cavin, Ralph K., m, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 
Chalmers, Alison E., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Toxicology. 
Chamblee, Douglas Scales, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 
Champion, Larry Stephen, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 
Chandler, Richard Edward, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Chandra, Suresh, Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Mechanical and 
Aerospace Engineering . 

Chaney, David Webb, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Textiles. 

Chang, Hou-min, Ph.D., Reuben B. Robertson Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 
Chang, Shoou-yuh, Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Civil Engineering. 
Chang, Simon W., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 
Chao, Allen C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Chaplin, James Ferris, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 
Chapman, Stephen N., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 
Charlton, Hai-vey Johnson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Chen, Chen Loung, Ph.D., Research Associate in Wood and Paper Sciencew. 
Chen, Su-Shing, Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Electrical and Com- 
puter Engineering 

Chen, Yuang-Sung Al, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting. 
Chem, Rey T., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Chemoff, Neil, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Toxicology. 



228 



Chilton, M.-D., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Genetics. 

Chilton, William Scott, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Botany. 

Chokani, Ndaona, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Chou, Wushow, Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 

Chow, Mo- Yuen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Christensen, Vem L., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Chromy, James Raymond, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Chu, Moody Ten-Chao, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Chulcwu, Ethelbert Nwalcuche, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Chung, Kwong Tuzz, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Chung, Lung Ock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Clapp, Timothy G., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Clark, Edward Depriest, Sr., Hi.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of English. 

Clark, James William, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Clark, Kenneth Dean, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Clark, Lawrence M., D.Ed., Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Clark, Robert Louis, Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Clark, Roger H., M.Arch., Professor of Architecture. 

Clark, Tony P., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Clarkson, John M., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Classen, John Jacob, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Claxton, Larry D., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

Clayton, Carlyle Newton, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Clayton, Maurice Hill, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Cleaveland, Walter Ranee, II, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Cleland, John G., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Clifford, William Bramwell, II, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Clouse, Steve Dotson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Cobb, Grover Cleveland, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Coble, Harold Dean, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Cochran, Fred Derward, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Cockerham, Columbus Clark, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Coe, Charles K., D.P.A., Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Cofer, Eloise Snowden, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Coffey, Max Terry, Adjunct Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Coggins, Leroy, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Cohen, Joann Deborah, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Cole, James Lawrence, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Colin, Scipio A. J., Ill, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Collazo, Jaime A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor (USDI) of Zoology. 

Collins, Patricia W., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Collins, Wanda Williams, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Collins, William Kerr, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Colvin, David Payne, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Comins, Daniel L., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Conkling, Mark A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Conner, Mark C, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Conrad, Hans, D.Eng., Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Conte, Thomas Martin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Converse, Sharolyn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Cook, James W., Jr., Ph.D., I»rofessor of Physics. 



229 



Cook, Maurice Gayle, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Cooke, Armand Vincent, B.S., Associate Professor of Industrial Design. 

Cooke, James A., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Cooper, Arthur Wells, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Cooper, Ralph L., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Anatomy, Kiysiology, and Radiology. 

Cooper, Richard J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Coots, Alonzo Freeman, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 

Cope, Will Allen, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Copeland, Billy Joe, Hi.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Copeland, Dana Derward, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Corbin, Frederick Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Cordell, Harold Kenneth, Hi.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism 

Management. 

Corder, Billie F., Ed.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Cormier, Denis R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Comman, Charles R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Comwell, John C, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Correa, Maria T., Ki.D., AssisUnt Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Coster, John K., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Cotanch, Stephen Robert, Hi.D., Professor of Physics. 

Coutu, Arthur James, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Covington, David H., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Cowen, Peter, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Cowling, Ellis Brevier, Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor of Forestry. 

Cox, Chandra Denise, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Industrial Design. 

Cox, Frederick Russell, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Cox, Walter Lee, Jr., Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Occupational Education. 

Craig, Lee A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Crane, Stephen Wallace, D.V.M., Adjunct Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Crawford, Elizabeth Manny, Hi.D., Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Creamer, Nancy G., Hi.D., Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Cribbins, Paul Day, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Crickenberger, Roger Gilbert, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Crisp, James Ernest, Ki.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Crofton, Kevin M., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Toxicology. 

Croom, Warren James, Jr., Hi.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Cross, Ford A., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Crossland, Cathy L., Ed.D., Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Crow, Jeffrey J., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of History. 

Crow, Johnny Lee, Ed.D., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Crowder, Larry B., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Crozier, Carl R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Cubbage, Frederick W., Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Cubeta, Marc, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Cuculo, John Anihony, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Culbreth, Charles Thomas, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Cullen, John Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

CuUinan, Douglas A., Ed.D., Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Cummings, George August, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Cummings, Ralph Waldo, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Cunningham, Joseph William, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 



230 



Cunningham, Mary Kathleen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Cuomo, Jerome J., Ph.D., Distinguished University Research Professor of Materials Science and 

Engineering. 

Curtin, Terrence Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Curtin, Thomas Brian, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Curtis, Patricia A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Curtis, Stephanie Elise, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics. 

Czaja, Ronald F., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Dahle, Robert David, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Daley, Dennis M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Dallas, Walter Southwick, Hi.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Microbiology. 

Damerdji, Halim, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Danby, John Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Dandridge, Edmund Pendleton, Jr., Ki.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of English. 

Danehower, David Allen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Daneshvar, Kasra, Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Electrical and 

Computer Engineering. 

Daniels, Harry V., Ri.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Daniels, Raymond Bryant, Ki.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Danielson, Leon E., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Das, Kalyankumar, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Daub, Margaret E., Ri.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Davenport, Donald Gould, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Davey, Charles Bingham, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

David, Joseph Wayne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Davidson, Michael Glenn, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Davies, Eric, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Davies, Peter Robert, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Davis, Adam Clarke, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Davis, David Edward, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Zoology. 

Davis, Edward W., Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Davis, Eric L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Davis, Gary S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Davis, Hawthorne A., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Textile and 

Apparel Management. 

Davis, Jean K., D.P.A., Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Davis, Jeanine Marie, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Davis, Jerry Mallory, Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Davis, K. Shannon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Davis, Meredith, M.F.A., Professor of Graphic Design. 

Davis, Robert Foster, Ph.D., Kobe Steel Distinguished University Professor of Materials Science and 

Engineering. 

Davis, William Robert, Doktor der. Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Davis-Gardner, Angela, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Dawes, Gregory Alan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Dawson, Clebum Gilchrist, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Deal, Earl L., Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Wood and Paper Science. 

DeBarr, Gary Lee, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Forestry. 

De Buysscher, Eduard V., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Deegan, William L., Ed.D., Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 



231 



Deen, John, Ph.D., AssisUtnt Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

De Grand, Alexander Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

De Hertogh, August A., Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

DeHoff, Paul H., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Mechanical and 

Aerospace Engineering. 

Deitz, Lewis Levering, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

DeJamette, Fred Roark, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

DeJoy, Daniel Allen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication. 

Delia Fave, L. Richard, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

DeLuca, V. William, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

DeMaria, Mark, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

DeMaster, David John, I%.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Denig, Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Dent, Robin William, M.S., Adjunct Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

deSteiguer, Joseph Edward, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Devine, Hugh A., Ph.D., Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Dewey, Ralph Earl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Dewhirst, Mark W., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 

DeWitt, David P., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

De Young, David J., D.V.M., Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 

Diaz, Lope Max, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Industrial Design. 

Dickens, James William, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Dickey, David Alan, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Dickson, Gary W., Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Dietert, Rodney R., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Poultry Science. 

Dietz, E. Jacquelin, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Dillard, Emmett Urcey, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Dillman, Richard Carl, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Dixon, Philip M., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Doak, George Osmore, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 

Dobrogosz, Walter Jerome, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology. 

Doerr, Phillip David, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Doggett, Wesley Osborne, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Dolce, Carl John, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Educational Leadership and Program Evaluation. 

Donaldson, Robert Alan, A. Design., Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Donaldson, William Emmert, Ki.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Poultry Science. 

Dorff, Robert Hetherington, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public 

Administration. 

Doster, Joseph Michael, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Dougherty, Hiillip M., Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Forestry. 

Douglas, Robert Alden, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Dow, Thomas Alva, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Downs, Murray Scott, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History. 

Downs, Robert Jack, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Drake, Thomas George, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Dreher, Kevin L., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Anatomy, Kiysiology, and Radiology. 

Dreifus, David Lane, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Drewes, Donald William, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Driggera, Louis Bynum, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Duckett, Wendy Marlene, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Dudziak, £>onald J., Ph.D., Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Duel-Hallen, Alexandra, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 



232 



Duffield, John Warren, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Duncan, Harry Ernest, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Dunn, Joseph C, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Dunphy, Edward James, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Durant, Jack Davis, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Dutrow, George F., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Forestry. 

Dutton, John C, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Dvorak, William Stephen, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Dwyer, Rex A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Dykstra, Michael Jack, Ph.D., Electron Microscopy Director, Microbiology, Pathology and 

Parasitology 

Eaker-Rich, Deborah Jeanne, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Easley, James E., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Eberhardt, Allen C, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ebisuzaki, Yukiko, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Eckels, Arthur Raymond, D.Engr., Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Eckerlin, Herbert Martin, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Edelfelt, Roy A., Ed.D., Adjunct Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Edens, Frank Wesley, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Edmisten, Keith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Edwards, Jack R., Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Edwards, John Auert, I%.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Edwards, Lx>ui8 Laird, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Eggleston, David B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Eischen, Jeffrey Warren, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Eisemann, Joan H., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Eisen, Eugene J., Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Animal Science. 

El-Masry, Nadia A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

El-Shiekh, Aly H. M., Sc.D., Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Elkan, Gerald Hugh, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Microbiology. 

Elliott, Robert Neal, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of History. 

Ellison, Donald C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Ellner, Stephen Paul, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

EUovich, Risa S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

EUwood, Eric Louis, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Wood and Paper Science. 

Elmaghraby, Salah E., Ph.D., University Professor of Operations Research. 

Ely, John Frederick, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Emerson, Paul D., B.S., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science. 

Emery, Donald Allen, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Emigh, Ted H., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Genetics. 

English, Robert V., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and 

Parasitology. 

Entman, Robert, Ph.D., Professor of Communication. 

Erchul, William P., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Erickson, Edward Walter, Ph.D., Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 

Erickson, Wayne D., Sc.D., Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Esbenshade, Kermeth Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Estes, Edmund Anthony, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Evans, David G., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Evans, Robert Oliver, Jr., Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 



233 



Everitt, Jeffrey, D.V.M., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and 

Parasitology. 

Exum, Herbert A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Counselor Education. 

Faclder, Paul L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Fadum, Ralph Eigil, S.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Fahmy, Abdel-Aziz, Ph.D., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Fairchild, Patricia J., Ed.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Adult and Conununity College 

Education. 

Fang, Shu-Chemg, Ph.D., Professor of Operations Research. 

Fantz, Paul R., Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Farin, Charlotte E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Farkas, Brian E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Farmer, Edgar I., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Famum, Peter, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Forestry. 

Farrier, Maurice Hugh, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

Fatea, Irene D., M.ARC, Visiting Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

Fathi, Yahya, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Faulkner, Gary D., Hi.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

FauntJeroy, Amassa C, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Feam, Robert Morcom, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Feaver, Marianne N., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Fedkiw, Peter S., Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Felder, Richard Mark, Ph.D., Hoechst-Celanese Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Fels, John Edward, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Fenner, Gregory Peck, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Ferket, Peter Rudolf, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ferrell, James K., Ri.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering. 

Ferster, Judith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Fike, William Thomas, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Fikry, Mohamed M., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Fine, Jo-David, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 

Fingeret, Harma Arlene, Ph.H., Adjunct Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Fiscus, Edwin Lawson, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Fisher, Douglas, Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Fisher, Dwight Stames, Hi.D., Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Fisher, John S., Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Fites, Roger Carl, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Fitzpatrick, Ben G., Hi.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Flammer, Keven, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Flath, David Joseph, Ri.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Fleenor, John W., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Fleisher, Lloyd Norman, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Flentung, Henry Pridgen, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 

Fletcher, Oscar Jasper, Jr., PH.D, Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Flowers, James L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Flowers, William Lucas, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Fodor, Ronald Victor, Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Foegeding, Edward Allen, Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Foegeding, Peggy Matthews, Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Fonteno, William Carl, II, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Foote, Vincent Millard, B.S., Professor of Industrial Design. 



234 



Ford, Richard Banbury, D.V.M., Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 
Fomaro, Robert Joseph, Ri.D., Professor of Computer Science. 
Fomes, Raymond Earl, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Foster, William E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
Fouts, James R., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Toxicology. 
Fox, Barbara J., Ph.D., Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 
Frampton, Lewis John, Jr., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. 
Franke, John Erwin, F^.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Franklin, Edward Carlyle, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Franzon, Paul Damian, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 
Franzoni, Linda P., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Frazier, Katherine Beal, Ph.D., Professor of Accounting. 
Frederick, Douglas J., Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 
Freedman, Leon David, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 
Freeman, Benny Dean, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Freeman, Harold Stanley, Ph.D., Ciba-Geigy Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 
Science. 

Frey, H. Christopher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Fuller, Frederick Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 
Fulp, Ronald Owen, Ri.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
Funderlic, Robert E., Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 
Funkhouser, Edward Truman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication. 
Gadsby, John Evan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 
Gallagher, Victoria J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication. 
Garaizar, Francisco Javier, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Garber, Simon K., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 
Garcia, Bertram Howard, Jr., M.S., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Gardner, Randolph Gilbert, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 
Gardner, Robin Pierce, Ph.D., Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 
Garlich, Jimmy Dale, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 
Garoutte, Dennis Evo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Garson, George David, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 
Garval, Michael, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 
Gast, Michael F., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 
Gehringer, Edward Francis, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 
Gerig, Thomas Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 
Gerler, Edwin Roland, Jr., Ed.D., Professor of Counselor Education. 
Gerstel, Dan Ulrich, Ri.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 
Gerstner, Eitan, Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 
Gerwin, Richard A., D.Sc, Adjunct Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 
Getsinger, Kurt D., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Crop Science. 
Getzen, Forrest William, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 
Ghosh, Tushar Kanti, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 
Giesbrecht, Francis Gerhard, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 
Gilbert, Charles Gorman, Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Gilbert, John Henderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Admin- 
istration. 

Gilbert, Richard Dean, Ri.D., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 
Gildersleeve, Richard P., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 
Gilger, Brian, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 
Gillea-Karam, Rosemary, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 
Gilliam, Henry Cornelius, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource 



235 



Economics. 

Gilliam, James F., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Gilliam, James Wendell, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Gilligan, John G., Ph.D., Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Gilmartin, David Paul, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Gilmore, Thomas F., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Glass, Jeffrey T., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Glass, Joseph Conrad, Jr., Ed.D., Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Glazener, Edward Walker, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Poultry Science. 

Gleason, Jane Marie, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Glisson, Tildon H., Jr., Hi.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Gloster, Clay Samuel, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Goetze, Alfred John, Hi.D., Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Gold, Harvey Joseph, Hi.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Goldfarfo, Barry, Ri.D., Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Goldman, Ralph Frederick, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and 

Science. 

Goldstein, Irving S., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Wood and Paper Science. 

Goldstein, Joyce Allene, Adjunct Professor of Toxicology. 

Goldsworthy, Thomas L., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and 

Parasitology. 

Gomez, Guillermo G., Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Gomez, Joseph A., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Gonzalez, Alan A., Hi.D., Professor Emeritus of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Gonzalez, Gabriel F., Hi.D., Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Gooding, Guy Vernon, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Goodman, Major M., Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds 

Professor of Crop Science. 

Goodnight, James Howard, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Goodwin, Barry Kent, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Gorman, Christopher B., Ri.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Gould, Christopher Robert, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Gould, Fred L., Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Entomology. 

Gould, Richard David, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Grady, Perry Linwood, Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Grainger, John Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Grand, Larry Frank, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Grandage, Arnold Herbert, Hi.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Grant, Christine Sharon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Grant, William Cullen, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Gratzl, Josef Stefan, Ph.D., Elis and Signe Olsson Professor and Graduate Alumni Distinguished 

Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Gray, Denis Owen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Green, David Patrick, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Green, James T., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Greene, David B., Ph.D., Professor of Liberal Studies. 

Greenlaw, Ralph Weller, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History. 

Greenstein, Theodore N., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Gregory, James E>ouglas, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Gregory, Max E., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Gregory, Walton Cariyle, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Gremaud, Pierre A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 



236 



Grennes, Thomas James, M.A., Professor of Business Management. 

GrifTm, Clifford E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Griffis, Dieter P., Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Griffith, Wayland Coleman, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Grimes, Barbara Hartley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 

Grimes, Jesse Lee, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Grimwood, James Michael, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Grindem, Carol B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Groom, Martha, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Gross, Charlotte, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Gross, Harry Douglas, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Grossfeld, Robert Michael, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Grove, Thurman Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Guion, Thomas Hyman, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, 

and Science. 

Gumpertz, Marcia Lynn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Gunner, Michael B., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and 

Science. 

Gupta, Ajaya K., Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Gupta, Bhupender S., Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Gurley, Edward Dewitt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Gustke, Larry D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Guy, James Stanley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Gwynn, George Richard, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Gyurcsik, Ronald Steven, I^.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Haaland, Perry D., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Haase, David Glen, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Hader, Robert John, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Hafley, William Leroy, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Hagan, Nancy E., Hi.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Hagler, Winston Murry, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Hain, Fred Paul, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Hair, Jay D., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Halberstadt, Amy G., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Hale, Francis Joseph, Sc.D., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Hale, Scott Andrew, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Hall, Alastair Robert, Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Hall, Anthony Douglas, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Hall, Carol K., Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Hall, Charles E., Jr., Hi.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Hall, George Lincoln, Hi.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Hall, Janice S., Ed.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Counselor Education. 

Hall, Joseph Clemon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

Hallen, Hans, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Haller, Cynthia Rexford, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Halperen, Max, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Hamann, Donald Dale, Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Hambourger, Robert M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Hamby, Dame Scott, B.S., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Hamilton, Craig Alan, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Hamilton, Pat Brooks, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Poultry Science. 

Hamlett, Patrick W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 



237 



Hamm, Thomas E., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 

Hamme, John Valentine, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and 

Engineering. 

Hammerberg, Bruce, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Hammon, Gordon A., B.S., Associate Professor Emeritus of Parks, Recreation and Tourism 

Management. 

Hamouda, Hechmi, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Hanck, Kenneth William, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Haning, Blanche Coumoyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Hankins, Orlando Elwood, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda K., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 

Hanna, Adel F., Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Hansen, Arthur Paul, Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Hansen, Bernard D., D.V.M., Visiting Assistant Professor of Con^anion Animal and Special 

Species Medicine. 

Hansen, Donald Joseph, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Mathematics. 

Hanson, Durwin Melford, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Occupational Education. 

Hanson, James William, M.A., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Computer Science. 

Hanson, John Melvin, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Hanson, Warren Durward, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Genetics. 

Hardie, Elizabeth Mills, Ki.D., Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Hardin, Charles C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 

Hardin, James Walker, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Hargrave, Harry Allen, Hi.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of English. 

Harmon, Frank C, A.A.Dipl., Associate Professor of Architecture. 

Harper, James Douglas, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Harper, Loretta F., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Harrell, Cleon Wallace, Jr., M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Business Management. 

Harrington, Ben Davis, D.V.M., Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Harrington, Walter Joel, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Harris, Edwin F., Jr., B.A., Visiting Professor of Architecture. 

Harris, James Ray, D.V.M., Professor Emeritus of Poultry Science. 

Harris, William Charles, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Harrison, Antony Howard, Ki.D., Professor of English. 

Hart, Clarence Arthur, Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Hart, Franklin Delano, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Hartwig, Robert Eduard, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Harvey, Paul Henry, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Harvey, Raymond W., Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Haskett, Mary Elizabeth, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Hassan, Awatif El-Domiaty, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Hassan, Hassan Ahmad, Ph.D., Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and 

Aerospace Engineering. 

Hassan, Hosni Moustafa, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology. 

Hassan, Tasnim, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Hassler, William Walton, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Zoology. 

Hastings, Felton Leo, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Entomology. 

Hauser, John Reid, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Havenstein, Gerald B., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Havner, Kerry Shuford, Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 



238 



Hawkins, Eleanor C, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Companion Aninnial and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Hayes, Arthur Courtney, M.S., Associate Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, 

and Science. 

Hayne, Don William, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Haynes, Frank Lloyd, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Haynie, William J., QI, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Headen, Alvin E., Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Heagle, Allen Streeter, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Heath, Ralph C, B.S., Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Heatwole, Harold Franklin, Hi.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Hebert, Teddy Theodore, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Hebrank, John H., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Heck, Walter Webb, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Heimbach, Clinton Louis, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Heindel, Jerrold J., Hi.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Heiniger, Ronnie W., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Heitmann, John A., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Helminck, Aloysius Gerardus, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Hemenway, Cynthia L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

Henderson, Warren Robert, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Henry, Leslie Tolley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Hentz, Forrest Clyde, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Herbert, David Ames, Jr., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Hergeth, Helmut H. A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Herkert, Joseph R., D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 

Herman, David J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Hersh, Solomon I^ilip, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Hess, Thomas M., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Hessling, Peter A., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Program 

Evaluation. 

Hester, Marvin Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Hesterfoerg, Dean L. R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Hibbard, James P., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Hiday, Virginia Aldige, Ri.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Hightower, Joseph E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor (USDI) of Zoology. 

Hill, Charles Horace, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Poultry Science. 

Hill, Gary D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Hillmann, Ruediger Carl, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

Hines, Anson Hemingway, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Hines, Thomas Ira, M.A., Professor Emeritus of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Hinesley, Lewis Eric, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Hinks, David, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Hinshaw, Jeffrey M., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Hitczenko, Pawel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Hoban, Thomas J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Hobbs, Joseph Patrick, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Hobgood, Thonias N., Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Hodge, Gary R., Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Hodge, George Lawrence, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Hodges, Charles S., Jr., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Hodges, Steven C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Science. 



239 



Hodgson, Ernest, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor and Graduate Alumni Distinguished 
Professor of Toxicology. 

Hodgson, Thom Joel, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 
Hodgson, Thomas H., Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aero^ace Engineering. 
Hodson, Ronald G., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Hoey, John Joseph, IV, Ed.D., Visiting AssisUnt Professor of Adult and Community College 
Education. 

Hoffman, Robert Lewis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 
Holland, ScoO D., Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Holler, William M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 
HoUey, Daniel Lester, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 
HoUey, Linda Tarte, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
Holmes, Thomas P., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. 
Holt, Matthew T., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
Holthausen, Duncan McClave, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Holtzman, Abraham, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Public Administration. 
Honeycutt, Thomas Lynn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science. 
Hooker, Willard E., M.L.A.R., Professor of Horticultural Science. 
Hooper, Percy R., M.P.D., AssisUnt Professor of Industrial Design. 
Hoover, Dale Max, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
Hoover, Maurice William, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 
Hoover, Michael T., Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Hopfenberg, Harold Bruce, Ph.D., Camille Dreyfus Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Hopkins, Brinton A., Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Animal Science. 

Hopkins, Thomas Sawyer, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 
Horan, Patricia F., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 
Horie, Yasuyuki, Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Horn, John William, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 
Horton, Horace Robert, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry. 
Hoss, Donald Earl, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Houlihan, G. Thomas, Ed.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Educational Leadership and Program 
Evaluation. 

Howard, E>onald R., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Companion Animal and Special Species 
Medicine. 

Howard, James Lawrence, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Psychology. 
Hoyt, Greg D, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Science. 
Hren, John Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 
Huang, Jeng-Sheng, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 
Huber, Steven C, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Hudson, Lola C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 
Hudson, Peyton BlarKhe, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Textile and Apparel Manage- 
ment. 

Hudson, Samuel Mack, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 
Science. 

Huffman, Rodney L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 
Hughes-Oliver, Jacqueline M., Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Sutistics. 
Hugus, Z Zimmerman, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 
Hulbert, Alan W., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 
Sciences. 

Humenik, Frank James, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 
Hummer, Joseph Edmund, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Humphries, Ervin Grigg, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 



240 



Hunt, Elaine, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Hunter, Norman Alan, M.A., Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Hunter, William D., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

Huntsman, Gene Raymond, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Huxster, William T., Jr., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Hyman, David Neil, Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Hyman, Theodore Martin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Dinen, Loren Albert, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Cjima, Toshiro, Dr. Eng., Adjunct Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, aiKl Science. 

Ipsen, Dse, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Isleib, Thomas G., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Israel, Daniel Wesley, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Soil Science. 

Ito, Kazufumi, D.Sc, Professor of Mathematics. 

Iyer, Kailasam R., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Iyer, S. Purushothaman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Jackson, Walter Anderson, EI, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Jackson, William Addison, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Jameel, Hasan, Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Janowitz, Gerald Saul, Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Janssens, Robert V., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Physics. 

Jarrett, Ronald E., Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Jasper, Warren J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Javidi, Manoochehr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication. 

Jaykus, Lee-Ann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Jenkins, Alvin Wilkins, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Jenkins, David Morris, Ed.D., Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Jenkins, John Mitchell, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Jennings, Gregory Donald, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Jesseph, Douglas M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of I^ilosophy and Religion. 

Jett, Jackson Bates, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Jewell, Larry Ray, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Ji, Chueng-ryong, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Miysics. 

Jing, Naihuan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Johnson, Charles Edward, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Johnson, Joseph Clyde, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Johnson, Melissa A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication. 

Johnson, Paul Reynolds, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Johnson, Richard R., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Johnson, Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Johnson, William Hugh, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Johnson, William L., Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Johnston, David West, Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Johnston, Karen Lynn, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Jolly, Mark R., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Jones, Charles Parker, Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Jones, Edwin John, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Jones, Evan Earl, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Jones, Frank T., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Jones, Guy Langston, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Jones, Ivan Dunlavy, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Jones, James Robert, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 



241 



Jones, John Richard, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Con^>uter Engineering. 

Jones, Lawrence Keith, Ph.D., Professor of Counselor Education. 

Jones, Ronald Klair, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Jones, Victor Alan, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Jordan, William J., Ph.D., Professor of Communication. 

Jorgensen, Jacques Richard, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Forestry. 

Joyce, Thomas Wayne, Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Joyner, Charles Edward, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Design. 

Juang, Jer-Nan, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Kahn, Joseph Stephan, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry. 

Kalat, James William, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Kalinga, Owen J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Kaltofen, Erich L., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Kamprath, Eugene John, Ph. D.William Neal Reynolds Professor of Soil Science. 

Kamykowski, Daniel, Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Kanich, Robert Emil, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Microbiology. 

Kaplan, Michael L., Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Kaplan, Norman L., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Kasal, Bohumil, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Kashef, Abdel-Aziz Ismail, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Kasichainula, Jagannadham, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Materials Science and 

Engineering. 

Katz, Steven B., Hi.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Katzin, Gerald Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Kauffman, James Frank, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Kaw, Jerry McHugh, Hi.D., AssisUnt Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Kawanishi, Clinton Y., Hi.D., Adjunct Professor of Entomology. 

Kay, Michael G., Hi.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Kay, Stratford Haman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Kebschull, Harvey G., Ri.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Keedy, John L., Ed.D, Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Keene, Bruce William, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Keever, Dennis Whitener, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Kelley, Arthur Woodfm, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Kelley, Carl Timothy, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Kellison, Robert Clay, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Kelly, John Rivard, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Kelly, Myron William, Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Kelly, Robert M., Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Keltic, Richard F., Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Kennedy, George Grady, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Entomology. 

Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne, Ph.D., Visiting Research Associate Professor of Microbiology, 

Pathology and Parasitology . 

Kenney, Garrison Q., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Kepler, Thomas B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Kerns, Sherra E., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Kessel, John Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Kessler, Sanford H., Hi.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Keyes, John Wesley, Jr., M.D., Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Keys, Robert Dean, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 



242 



Khachatoorian, Haig, M.Sc, Professor of Industrial Design. 

Khaledi, Morteza G., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Khan, Saad A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Khater, Akram Fouad, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Kheyfets, Arkady, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Khorram, Siamak, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Khosla, Narendra Prakash "Paul*, Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Kilpatrick, Peter Kelley, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Kim, Jung Hyoun, Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Electrical and 

Computer Engineering . 

Kim, Ki Wook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Kim, Youngsoo Richard, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Kimbell, Julia S., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Kimberley, Michael Murray, Ri.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Kimler, William C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Kincheloe, Henderson Grady, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 

King, Doris Elizabeth, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History. 

King, L. Ellis, D. Engr., Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering. 

King, Larry Dean, Ki.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

King, Margaret Fontaine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

King, Richard Adams, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

King, Russell E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Kingon, Angus Ian, Hi.D., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Kirby, Barbara Malpiedi, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Kirk, Thomas Kent, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Kirkpatrick, Gary J., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Kirsch, Sondra Lee, M.S., Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Klaenhammer, Todd Robert, Ph.D., Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor and William Neal 

Reynolds Professor of Food Science. 

Klang, Eric Carl, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Kleeman, Karl Terrance, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology. 

Klein, Katherine W., Hi.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Kleinstreuer, Clement, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Kleiss, Harold Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Klenin, Marjorie Anne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Klett, David E., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Kloos, Wesley Edwin, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics. 

Knappe, Detlef R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Knauft, David Alan, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Knoeber, Charles Robert, Fli.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Knopp, James Arthur, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 

Knott, Elizabeth S., Ed.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Knowles, Albert Sidney, M.A., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Knowles, Charles Ernest, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Knowles, Malcolm Shepherd, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Koch, Carl Conrad, Ph.D., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Koch, Steven E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Kochersberger, Robert C, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 



243 



Koh, Kwangil, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Kolb, John Ronald, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Kolbas, Robert Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Konsler, Thomas Rinehart, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Koonce, Benjamin Granade, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Korach, Kenneth Steven, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Biochemistry. 

Korosec, Ronnie LaCourse, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public 

Administration. 

Korte, Charles D., Ph.D., Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 

Krawczyk, Katherine Ann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Kriz, George James, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Kronberg, Charles L., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Kropaczek, David J., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Krstulovic, Neven, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Krueger, Kenneth K., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Poultry Science. 

Kuehn, Richard Theodore, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering. 

Kuhr, Ronald John, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Kwanyuen, Prachuab, Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

LaVopa, Anthony Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Laarman, Jan Garret, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Lackey, Carolyn Jean, Ph.D., Professor of Nutrition. 

Lada, Thomas Joseph, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Lado, Fred, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Ladrach, William Ernest, M.F., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Laffitte, Bryan W., M.P.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Design. 

Lala, Parag, Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Electrical and Computer 

Engineering . 

Lamb, Harold Henry, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Lambe, I^ilip C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Lambeth, Clements Coake, Hi.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Lancia, Richard A., Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Lane, Robert Craig, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Langenbach, Robert J., Hi.D., Adjunct Professor of Toxicology. 

Langfelder, Leonard Jay, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Lanier, Tyre Calvin, Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Lapp, John Sumner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Larick, Duane Kent, Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Larson, Ronald Brian, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Larson, Roy Axel, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Laryea, Doris Lucas, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Lassiter, Charles A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Laster, Scott M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology. 

Latch, Dana May, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Lea, Russell, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

Leach, James Wc>odrow, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Leath, Steven, Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Leatherwood, James M., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

LeBlanc, Gerald A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Toxicology. 

Lecce, James Giacomo, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Lee, Donald W., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Lee, Gordon K. F., Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 



244 



Lee, Joshua Alexander, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Lee, Stan Sun-Hwa, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Lee, Wynetta, Ed.D, Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Lee, Yuan-Shin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Legates, lames Edward, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Leidy, Ross B., Ph.D., Professor of Toxicology. 

Leiter, Jeffrey Carl, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Leith, Carlton James, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Leithold, Elana Lynn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Leming, Michael Lloyd, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Leonard, Rebecca, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication. 

Lester, James C, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

LeVere, Thomas Earl, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Levi, Patricia E., Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Toxicology. 

Levin, Harold D., Hi.D., Associate Professor of I^ilosophy and Religion. 

Levine, Jack, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Levine, Jay F., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Levine, Joseph, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Levine, Samuel Gale, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Levings, Charles Sanford, m, Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor and William Neal 

Reynolds Professor of Genetics. 

Levy, Michael G., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Lewis, Glenn E., M.P.D., Professor of Industrial Design. 

Lewis, Richard J., D.B.A., Professor of Business Management. 

Lewis, William Mason, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Ley, David Henry, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Li, Bailian, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Liehr, Sarah K., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Liles, Richard Terry, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Lilley, Stephen Charles, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Lilly, John Paul, M.S., Associate Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Lim, Phooi K., Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Lin, Xiao-Biao, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Lin, Yuh-Lang, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Lindbo, David L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Linder, Sune, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Forestry. 

Linderman, Russell J., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Lindgren, Peter B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Lindquist, David G., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Marine, Earth 

and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Liner, Hugh L., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Linker, Harry Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Linnerud, Ardell Chester, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Lisk, Thomas David, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Little, Trevor John, Ph.D., Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Littlejohn, Michael Anthony, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Liu, Ben-Hui, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Liu, Wentai, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Livengood, Charles Dwaine, Ed.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Livingston, David P., HI, Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Llewellyn, Robert Warren, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Industrial Engineering. 

Locke, Don Cary, Ed.D., Professor of Counselor Education. 



245 



Loeppeit, Richard Henry, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 

Loflis, David L., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Forertry. 

Lommel, Steven A., Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Long, Larry Wayne, Ph.D., Professor of Communication. 

Long, Raymond Carl, Ph.D., Professor of Ck^ Science. 

Longmuir, Ian Stewart, M.B.B., Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry. 

Loomis, Michael R., D.V.M., Adjunct Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special 

Species Medicine. 

Lord, Peter Reeves, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science. 

Lorenz, Carol Elaine, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Losordo, Thomas M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Love, Carolyn Smiley, Rj.D., Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Love, Joseph William, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Love, Nancy E., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Lowrey, Austin Sheridan, M.A.A., Professor of Graphic Design. 

Lu, Jye-Chyi, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Lucas, George Blanchard, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Lucas, Leon Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Lucovsky, Gerald, Ph.D., University Professor of Physics. 

Lueck, Dean L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Luginbuhl, Geraldine H., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology. 

Luginbuhl, James Emory Robinson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Luginbuhl, Jean-Marie, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Luh, Jiang, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Lumpkin, Angela, Ph.D., Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Luo, Ren-Chyuan, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Luria, Keith Phillip, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Lutz, Michael William, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Lyons, Kevin M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Lytle, Charles F., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Mackay, Trudy Frances, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics. 

MacKethan, Lucinda Hardwick, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Mackenzie, John M., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology. 

MacPhail-Wilcox, Elizabeth, Ed.D., Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Madala, Rangarao V., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Maday, Clarence Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Magallanes, Fernando Hernandez, M.L.A.R., Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Magill, Michele M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Magor, James Kitchener, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Mahaffey, James W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Maher, Dennis M., Ph.D., Research Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Main, Charles Edward, Hj.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Mainland, Charles Michael, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Makki, Rafic Z., I^.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Electrical and 

Computer Engineering . 

Malcom, Herbert Rooney, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Malecha, Marvin J., M.ARC, Professor of Architecture. 

Malinowski, Arlene C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Mallette, Bruce Ingram, Ed.D, Visiting Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Malone, Thomas F., Sc.D., Distinguished University Scholar of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 



246 



Mann, Carroll Lamb, B.S., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Mann, Thurston Jefferson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Genetics. 

Manning, Edward George, M.S., Associate Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering. 

Manooch, Charles Samuel, m, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Manring, Edward Raymond, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Marcellin, Denis J., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Marchi, Dudley Michael, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Margolis, Stephen E., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Markert, Clement L., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Markham, Stephen Keith, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Marlin, Joe Alton, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Maronpot, Robert R., D.V.M., Adjunct Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Marra, Michele C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Marsh, Culpepper Paul, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Marsh, Paul M., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Entomology. 

Marshall, Patricia L., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Marsland, David Boyd, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering. 

Martin, Clifford K., Ph.D., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Martin, David W., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Martin, Donald Crowell, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Computer Science. 

Martin, Edwin Alexander, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Martin, James D., Vh.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Martin, LeRoy Brown, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Martin, Robert H., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Martorella, Peter H., Ki.D., Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Masnari, Nino A., Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Mason, David Dickenson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Massey, Anne P., Hi.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Matthews, Hazel Benton, Jr., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Toxicology. 

Matthews, John M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Matthews, Neely Forsyth, Jones, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Mattox, Henry E., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of History. 

Matzen, Vernon Charles, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Matzinger, Dale Frederick, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Genetics. 

Mauney, Jon, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Maxwell, Earl Stuart, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry. 

May, Leila Silvana, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Mayo, Charles W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Mayo, Robert M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

McAllister, David Franklin, Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 

McCall, Patricia Lou, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

McCants, Charles Bernard, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

McClain, Jackson Meams, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public 

Administration. 

McClellan, Jacquelyn W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nutrition. 

McClenny, R. Lorraine, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

McClure, Eldon Ray, D.Eng., Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

McClure, William Fred, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 



247 



McConnell, Ernest Eugene, D.V.M., Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and 

Parasitology. 

McCord, Marian Gayle, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

McCracken, Ralph J., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Soil Science. 

McCraw, Roger L., Ph.D., Professor of Aninial Science. 

McCuUough, Rex Ben, Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Forestry. 

McDaniel, Benjamin Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

McDermed, Elizabeth Ann, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

McDonald, Patrick Hill, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

McDonald, Richarxi C, Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Entomology. 

McDowell, Robert E., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Animal Science. 

McElroy, Michael Bancroft, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

McEneaney, William M., Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Mathematics. 

McFeeters, Roger Floyd, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 

McGahan, Mary Christine, Ph.D., Research Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

McGraw, James Robert, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

McGregor, Ralph, Ph.D., Cone Mills Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

McGuire, Gary E., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

McKeand, Steven Edward, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry. 

McKelvey, Steven C, Ph.D., Visiting AssisUnt Professor of Forestry. 

McKenzie, Wendell Herbert, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics. 

McKinley, Craig R., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

McKiimey, Claude Eugene, B.A., Professor of University Administration. 

McKiiuiey, Thearon Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

McKirmey, William R., Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Mathematics. 

McLachlan, John A., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

McLarty, Peter Kerr, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

McLaughlin, Richard Allen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

McMurry, Linda O., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

McNeill, John Joseph, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

McPherson, Edwin Malcolm, M.A., Visiting Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

McRae, David Scott, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

McVay, Julie Gegner, Ed.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Counselor Education. 

Mehlenbacher, Bradley S., Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of English. 

Meier, Wilbur L., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Melton, Thomas A., HI, Ph.D., Philip Morris Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Melton, Thoyd, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology. 

Memory, Jasper Durham, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Menius, Arthur Clayton, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Mercer, D. Evan, Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Forestry. 

Mershon, Donald Hartland, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Mertz, John Pierre, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Messere, Carl J., Ph.D., KPMB Peat Marwick Professor of Accounting. 

Mettler, Lawrence Eugene, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Genetics. 

Meuten, Donald J., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Meyer, Carl Dean, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Meyer, John Richard, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Meyer, Robert E., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Meyer, Sharon A., Ph.D., Research AssisUnt Professor of Toxicology. 

Meyers, Walter Earl, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Michael, Joan J., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 



248 



Michaels, AUn Sherman, Sc.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering. 

Mickle, James Earl, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Middleton, Stephen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Mikkelsen, Robert L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Miles, Marion Lawrence, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Milholland, Robert Donald, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Miller, Carolyn Rae, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Miller, Conrad Henry, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Miller, Eric S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology. 

Miller, Grover Cleveland, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of 2Loology. 

Miller, Howard George, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Miller, John Maurice, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Miller, Joseph Edwin, Ri.D., Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Miller, Lathan Lee, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Parks, Recreation and Tourism 

Management. 

Miller, Texton Robert, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Occupational Education. 

Miller, Thomas Kenan, m, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Miller, William Dykstra, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Miller, William Laubach, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Biochemistry. 

Miner, Gordon Stanley, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Mink, James Walter, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Minnett, Peter J., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Mirka, Gary A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Misra, Kailash C, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Mistric, Walter Joseph, Jr., Hi.D., Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

Mitchell, Aime W. "Nancy", Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Mitchell, Gary Earl, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Mitchell, Karlyn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Mittal, Ravi Ompraksah, I^.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Moazed, Khosrow Louis, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Mochrie, Richar4 Douglas, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Mock, Gary Norman, Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Mohamed, Mansour H. M., Ki.D., Burlington Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

Mohapatra, Subhas Chandra, Ph.D., Senior Researcher in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Moll, Robert Harry, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Genetics. 

Monaco, Thomas Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Monahan, John F., Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Moncol, Daniel James, D.V.M., Professor Emeritus of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Monks, David W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Monroe, Robert James, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy Ann, Ph.D., Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Monteith, Larry King, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Montgomery, Terry G., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, 

and Science. 

Montoya-Weiss, Mitzi, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Moog, Robert S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Moore, Catherine Elizabeth, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of English. 

Moore, Charles Lee, Sr., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Moore, Eugene Franklin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Moore, Frank Harper, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 



249 



Moore, Gary E., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Moore, Harry B., Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

Moore, Jeannette A., Ph.D., Visiting AssisUnt Professor of Animal Science. 

Moore, Robert Parker, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Moore, Robin C, M.C.P., Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Moore, Roger L., Ph.D., Assisunt Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Moreland, Charles Glen, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Moreland, Donald Edwin, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Morgan, Paul H., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Morillo, John D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Morrison, James Emerson, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of English. 

Morrison, John Miller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Morrow, W. E. Morgan, Ki.D., Associate Professor of Aninul Science. 

Moss, Arthur Broadus, D.B.A., Professor Emeritus of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Mott, Ralph Lionel, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Mowat, J. Richard, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Moxley, Robert Lonnie, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Moyer, James William, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry. 

Mueller, James Paul, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Mulholland, James Andrew, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Mulligan, James Colvin, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

MuUin, Robert Bruce, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Mulvey, Paul W., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Munana, Karen R., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Murphy, Joseph Paul, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Murray, June P., Ri.D., Assistant Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 

Murray, Raymond LeRoy, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Engineering. 

Murty, K. Linga, Ph.D., Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Muslian, Robert David, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Myers, Richard Monier, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Mykyta, Larysa Anna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Nacoste, Rupert W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Naderman, George C, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Nagel, Robert T., Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Nagle, H. Troy, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Nalepa, Christine A., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Nappo, Carmen J., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Narayan, Jagdish, Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Nasisse, Mark Philip, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Nau, James Michael, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Nelson, Lawrence Alan, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Nelson, Paul Victor, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Nemanich, Robert J., Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Nerden, Joseph Taft, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Occupational Education. 

Neunzig, Herbert Henry, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

Newman, Slater Edmund, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Newmark, Craig M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Nicliol, John Brian, Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 



250 



Nichols, Thomas EvereU, Jr., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Nickel, Paul Adrian, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Nilsson, Ame A. J., Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Noble, Richard L., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Noga, Edward Joseph, D.V.M., Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 

Noggle, Glenn Ray, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Norris, Larry Keith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Norris, Mark A., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Norwood, Karen S., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Nunnally, Stephens Watson, PH.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Nutlle, Henry Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Nwankwo, Chimalum, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Nychka, Douglas W., Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Obenchain, Robert L., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Oblinger, James L., Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

O'Brien, Gail W., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

O'Brien, Terrance P., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Ocko, Jonathan Kevin, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Odle, Jack, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Odman, Mehmet T., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Oglesby, Charles Lucky, Ed.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Counselor Education. 

O'Grady, Peter John, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Okafor, Victor O., Hi.D., Assistant Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 

Okigbo, Amaechi Raphael, M.L.A., Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Olf, Heinz G., Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Olivry, Thierry, D.Vet., Assistant Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 

Ollis, David F., Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor of Chemical Engineering . 

Olsen, Bernard Martin, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Business Management. 

Olson, David John, M.A., Adjunct Associate Professor of History. 

Olson, Delmar Walter, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Occupational Education. 

Olson, Neil C, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

O'Malley, David M., Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

O'Neal, John Benjamin, Jr., Ph.D., Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor of Electrical and 

Computer Engineering. 

Oltmans, Arnold W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Opperman, Charles H., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Omdorff, Paul E., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Orr, David Boyd, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Orr, Miriam Elaine Neil, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Ort, Jon F., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Osborne, Susan Sinclair, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Osbum, Carlton M., Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Osteryoung, Janet G., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Osteryoung, Robert A., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

O'Sullivan, Elizabethann, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public 

Administration. 

Otto, Luther B., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Otvos, James D., Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry. 

Overcash, Michael Ray, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Overton, Margery Frances, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Oxender, Wayne D., Ph.D., Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 



251 



Oxenham, William, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Ozisik, Mehmet Necati, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ozturk, Mehmet C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Padilla, Arthur, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Paesler, Michael Arthur, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Pagach, £>onald P., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Page, Lavon Barry, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Page, Rodney L., Ph.D., Professor of Companion Aninwl and Special Species Medicine. 

Palmour, Hayne HI, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Palmquist, Raymond Bruce, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Pantula, Sastry G., Ph.D., Professor of Sutistics. 

Pao, Chia-Ven, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Pardue, Samuel Lloyd, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

Park, Hubert Vem, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Park, Jae Young, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Park, John Charles, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Parker, Beulah Mae, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Parker, Charles Alexander, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Communication. 

Parker, George William, III, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Parker, Michael L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Parker, S. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Parkhurst, Carmen Robert, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Parks, Leo W., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology. 

Pamell, James F., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Marine, Earth and 

Atmospheric Sciences. 

Parramore, Barbara Mitchell, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instrucdon. 

Parries, Robert E., Ed.D., Visiting AssisUnt Professor of Adult and Conununity College 

Education. 

Parsons, Gregory N., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Parsons, John Edward, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Paschal, Mary, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Pasour, Ernest Caleb, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Pattee, Harold Edward, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Botony. 

Patterson, Robert Preston, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Patty, Richard Roland, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Paulos, John J., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Paur, Sandra Orley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Pause, Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Design. 

Pawlik, Joseph R., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Marine, Earth 

and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Payne, Gary Alfred, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Peace, Robert L., J.D., Associate Professor of Accounting. 

Peacock, Charles H., Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Pearce, Douglas K., Ph.D., Professor of Business Management. 

Pearson, Richard Gustave, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Pearson, Ronald Gray, M.Eng., Professor Emeritus of Wood and Paper Science. 

Peck, John Gregory, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Peedin, Gerald Franklin, Ph.D., Philip Morris Professor of Crop Science. 

Peeler, Ralph James, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Peet, Mary M., Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Peiffer, Robert Louis, Jr., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and 

Parasitology. 



252 



Pelissier, Joseph M., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Penrose, Ann M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Peretti, Steven William, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Perkins, John Noble, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aero^ace Engineering. 

Perros, Harry G., Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 

Perry, Jerome John, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology. 

Perry, Katharine Browne, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Perry, Thomas O., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Perryman, Lance E., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Peters, Barry Paul, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Petersen, Keith Stuart, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Political ScieiKe and Public 

Administration. 

Peterson, Elnwr L., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Peterson, Richard Eric, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Peterson, Wilbur Carroll, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering. 

Petitte, James N., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Petrina, Stephen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Occupational Education. 

Petters, Robert M., Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Pettis, Joyce O., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Pettitt, John Mark, Ed.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Petty, Ian Timothy Donald, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Microbiology. 

Pharr, David Mason, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Phillips, Joseph Allen, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Phillips, Lyle Llewellyn, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Phillips, Richard B., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Philpot, Richard Michael, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Toxicology. 

Pierce, Christine M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Pierson, Terrence K., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Pietrafesa, Leonard Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Pilkington, E>wain H., Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Pitts, M. Henry, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Place, Jeffrey Wayne, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture. 

Piano, Linda S., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Plemmons, Robert J., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Computer Science. 

Poindexter, Julius Carl, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business Management. 

Poland, George Waverly, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Poling, Edward Barclay, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Pollock, Kenneth Hugh, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Pond, Samuel Barber, in, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Poore, Matthew H., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Pope, Carol A., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Pope, Daniel Townsend, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

Porter, Marianetta, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Design. 

Porter, Richard L., Ph.D., Lecturer in Materials Science and Engineering. 

Porterfield, Ira Deward, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Posey, Martin H., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty in Marine, Earth and 

Atmospheric Sciences. 

Potter, Richard M., Jr., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 



253 



Poulton, Bruce Robert, Ph.D., Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Powell, Dillard Martin, J.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Powell, Merle Autrey, Jr., M.L.A., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Powell, Nathaniel T., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Powell, Roger Allen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Prak, Anco Luning, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Industrial Engineering. 

Pramaggiore, Maria T., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Prater, John Thomas, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Preston, Jack, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Preston, Richard Joseph, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Preston, Robert Julian, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Toxicology. 

Price, William S., Jr., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of History. 

Prioli, Carmine Andrew, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Pritchard, Ruie Jane, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and InstrucUon. 

Proctor, Charies Harry, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Proctor, Dalton Ray, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Adult and Community College Education. 

Pugh, Charles Ray, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Pumell, Robert C, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Purrington, Suzanne Townsend, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Purugganan, Michael D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Putcha, Mohan S., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Quay, Thomas Lavelle, Rj.D., Professor Emeritus of Zoology. 

Quesenberry, Charles Price, Ki.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Quinn, Johanne A., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Qureshi, Muquarrab Ahmed, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Rabb, Robert Lamar, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

Rahman, M. Shamimur, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Rajala, Sarah Aim, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Rakes, Allen Huff, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Raleigh, James Arthur, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and 

Radiology. 

Raman, Sethu, Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Ramasubramanian, Melur K., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ramsay, Robert Todd, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ramsey, Harold Arch, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Rand, James Patrick, M.Arch., Associate Professor of Architecture. 

Ranjithan, S. Ranji, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ranney, Thomas G., Ph.D., Associate Professor of HorUcultural Science. 

Raper, Charles David, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Rasdorf, William John, Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Raulston, James Chester, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Raval, Shishir R., M.S., Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Rawlings, John Oren, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Rawls, Rachel Fulton, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Raymond, Dana G , M.F.A., Associate Professor of Design. 

Rea, Phillip Stanley, Re.D., Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Reeves, Douglas S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Regan, Thonuis Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Reichle, Heruy G., Jr., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Reid, Paul Nelson, Ph.D., Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 



254 



Reid, Traciei Venise, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Reiland, Thomas W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Reiman, Alan J., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and InstnicUon. 

Reineit, Richard Allyn, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Reisman, Arnold, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Reitich, Fernando L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Renkow, Mitchell Adam, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Reuer, Gunther John, Phill, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture. 

Reynolds, Michael Shane, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Reynolds, Stephen P., Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Rhodes, Donald Robert, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Rice, Arthur R., M.L.A., Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Rice, James A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Richards, M. Beverly, D.Ed., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Richardson, Daniel Craig, D.V.M., Adjunct Associate Professor of Companion Animal and Special 

Species Medicine. 

Richardson, Frances Marian, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Riddle, John Marion, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Ridgeway, Don Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Rifki, Fatih Ahmet, M.Arch., Associate Professor of Architecture. 

Riggs, Stanley R., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Rigney, Jackson Ashcraft, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Rindos, Andres John, m, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering. 

Riordan, Allen James, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Risley, John Stetler, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Risman, Barbara J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ristaino, Jean Beagle, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ritchie, David Frey, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Riviere, Jim Edmond, Ph.D., Burroughs Wellcome Distinguished Professor of Anatomy, 

Physiology and Radiology. 

Ro, Paul D Hwan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Robarge, Wayne Philip, Ph.D., Senior Researcher in Soil Science. 

Robbins, Woodrow Ernest, Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 

Roberson, Gary T., Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Roberts, George W., Sc.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Roberts, John Frederick, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Roberts, Malcolm Clive, Ph.D., Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Roberts, Stephen D., Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Roberts, William L., IV, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Roberts, William Milner, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Robertson, Dominique, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Robertson, Robert LaFon, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

Robinette, C. Lee, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Robinson, Mendel Leno, Jr., Ed.D, Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Robinson, Robert A., Ed.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism 

Management. 

Robinson, Tracy L., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Counselor Education. 

Robison, Odis Wayne, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Rochow, Theodore George, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, 

Chemistry, and Science. 



255 



Rodman, Robert D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Rodriguez, Jesus, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Roe, Charles E., M.R.P., Adjunct Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Roe, Richard Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Roe, Sharon Louise, M. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

Roe, Simon Charles, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Roeder, Kenneth R., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Roer, Robert D., Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Marine, Earth and 

Atmospheric Sciences . 

Rogers, Brenda H., Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Psychology. 

Rogers, Glenn M., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Rohrbach, Roger Phillip, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Roise, Joseph P., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Roland, Christopher M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Rose, Nicholas John, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Rose, Randy L., Ph.D., Visiting AssisUnt Professor of Toxicology. 

Ross, John Paul, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Ross, Steve W., Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Rossetti, Dino John, Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Rouphail, Nagui M., Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Rouskas, George N., Ph.D., Visiting AssisUnt Professor of Computer Science. 

Routbort, Jules Lazar, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Royster, Larry Herbert, Ri.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Rozgonyi, George A., Ph.D., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Rubin, Albert Robert, Ed.D, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Rubin, Eva Redfield, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Rubloff, Gary W., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Rucker, James Warren, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

Rufty, Rebeca C, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Rufty, Thomas W., Jr., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Crop Science. 

Rushing, John E., Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Russ, John C, M.S., Adjunct Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Russell, Burton L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication. 

Russell, Dale A., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Russell, Phillip E., Ph.D., I>rofessor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Rust, Jon Paul, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Rust, Paul James, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Rutherford, Henry Ames, M.A., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

Sabomie, Edward J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Saccopoulos, Christos A., M.Arch, Professor of Architecture. 

Sack, Ronald Herbert, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Safley, Charles D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Safley, Lawson McKinney, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Sagan, Hans, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Salami, M. Reza, Ph.D., Interinstitutional Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Civil Engineering. 

SalsUd, Mary Louise, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Sanchez, Pedro A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Sanders, Douglas Charles, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Sanders, Timothy H., Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 



256 



Sanii, EzatT., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Sannes, Phillip L., Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Sanoff, Henry, M.Arch., Professor of Architecture. 

Santago, Peter D, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Sargent, Frank Dorrance, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Sasser, Joseph Neal, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Sasser, Preston Eugene, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Saucier, Walter Joseph, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Savage, Carla D., Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 

Sawhney, Man Mohan, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Sawyers, Roby Blake, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Saxe, Raymond Frederick, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Engineering. 

Saxena, Vinod K., Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Sayers, Dale Edward, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Saylor, LeRoy Charles, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Scandalios, John G., Hi.D., Distinguished University Professor of Genetics. 

Scarborough, Clarence Cayce, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Matheniatics and Science Education. 

Scattergood, Ronald Otto, Sc.D., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

SchafTer, Henry Elkin, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics. 

Schal, Coby, Ph.D., Blanton J. Whitmire Professor of Entomology. 

Schecter, Stephen, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Schenk, Karen D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Schetzina, Jan Frederick, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Schiller, Anne L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Schlosser, Paul M., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Schoeneberger, Michele Meyer, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Schowalter, David G., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Schrag, Robert L., Ph.D., Professor of Communication. 

Schreiner, Anton Franz, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Schrimper, Ronald Arthur, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Scbulman, Michael D., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Schulte, Ann C, Ph.D., Associate IVofessor of Psychology. 

Schultheis, Jonathan Richard, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Schwalbe, Michael L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Schwartz, Steven J., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Scotford, Martha, M.F.A., Professor of Graphic Design. 

Scroggs, JefTrey S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Seagondollar, Lewis Worth, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Seagraves, James Arthur, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Seater, John Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Sederoff, Ronald R., Ph.D., Edwin F. Conger Professor of Forestry. 

See, Miles Todd, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Selgrade, James Francis, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Sellon, Debra Clabough, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Seltmarm, Heinz, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Semazzi, Fredrick H. M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Seneca, Ernest Davis, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Serow, Robert C, Ph.D., Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Setzer, Carl John, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Setzer, Sharon M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Severin, Laura R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 



257 



Seyam, Abdelfattah M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 
Shafer, Steven Ray, Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 
Shannon, Henry Anthony, Ed.M., Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Science 
Education. 

Shaw, Ping-Tung, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 
Shea, Damian, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Toxicology. 
Shear, Theodore H., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Forestry. 
Shearer, Michael, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Shearon, Ronald Wilson, Ed.D., Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education. 
Sheets, Thomas J., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Toxicology. 
Sheldon, Brian W., Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 
Shelton, James Edward, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Science. 
Shen, Qun, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Sherry, Barbara, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 
Shew, Howard David, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 
Shih, Jason C. H., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Shimura, Fumio, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 
Shoemaker, Paul Beck, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 
Shore, Scott Harold, Hi.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Microbiology. 
Shore, Thomas Clinard, Jr., Ed.D., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Occupational Education. 
Showers, William J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 
Shriner, John F., Jr., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics. 
Shultz, David A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Siderelis, Chryslos Dmitry, Ph.D., Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 
Siewert, Charles Edward, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
Silber, Robert, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Silverberg, Lawrence M., Hi.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Silverstein, Jack William, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Simmons, Richard Lee, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
Simons, Theodore R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor (USDI) of Zoology. 

Simonsen, Sofus Enunelov, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 
Singer, Michael F., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Singh, Harmohindar, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering. 

Singh, Munindar P., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 
Singh, Rudra Pratap, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 
Siopes, Thomas David, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 
Sisco, Paul Hardeman, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 
Sisler, Edward Carroll, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry. 
Sisson, Verne A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 
Sitar, Zlalko, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 
Skaggs, Richard Wayne, Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor, William Neal Reynolds Pro- 
fessor and Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 
Skroch, Walter Arthur, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 
Slatta, Richard Wayne, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Slenning, Barrel? Durand, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 
Small, Judy Jo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Smallwood, James E., D.V.M., Professor of Anatomy, Riysiology, and Radiology. 
Smart, Robert Charles, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Toxicology. 

SmeUna, Frederick Otto, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Smith, Carl Brent, Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chenaistry, and Science. 
Smith, Charles Eugene, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sutistics. 



258 



Smith, Donald E., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Zoology. 

Smith, Frank Houston, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Smith, Frank James, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Smith, Gary William, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Smith, Gilbert G., Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Snuth, J. C, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Smith, John David, Ph.D., Graduate Alunmi Distinguished Professor of History. 

Smith, Lee, B.A., Professor of English. 

Snuth, Marjolein V., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Smith, Norwood Graham, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of English. 

Snuth, William Adams, Jr., Eng.Sc.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Smith, William David, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Smith, William Dwight, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (USDA) of Forestry. 

Smith, William Edward, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Parks, Recreation and Tourism 

Management. 

Smith, William R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Smoak, Ida W., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Smoot, Jean Johannessen, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Smyth, Thomas Jot, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Sneed, Ronald Ernest, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Snyder, Samuel S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Snyder, Stephen W., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Snyder, Wesley Edwin, Hi.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Snyder, William Harold, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Solomon, Daniel L., Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Sommerich, Carolyn M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Sorensen, Kenneth Alan, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Soroos, Marvin Stanley, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Sorrell, Furman Yates, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Sosower, Mark L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Southern, Gilbert Edwin, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of History. 

Southern, Phillip Sterling, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Southward, Steve C, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Sowell, Robert Seago, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Spadaro, Joani, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Graphic Design. 

Spano, Michael R., Sr., Fli.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Spaulding, Kathy Ann, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Spears, Jerry W., Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Spears, Roger L., M.Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

Speck, Marvin Luther, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Spence, Lois Lundy, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Multidisciplinary Studies. 

Spencer, Stephanie Laine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Spiker, Steven L., Hi.D., Professor of Genetics. 

Spires, Hiller Abemathy, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Spivey, James J., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Spodnick, Gary J., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species 

Medicine. 

Sponuk, Richard J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Spooner, Jean D., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Spooner, William E., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 



259 



Sprinthall, Norman A., Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Counselor Education. 

Spurr, Harvey Wesley, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Srinivasarao, Mohan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Stack, Edward M., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Stadelmaier, Hans Heinrich, Dr.rer.nat, Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Stafford, Thomas H., Jr., Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Counselor Education 

Sulker, Harold Thomas, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Stallmann, Matthias Friedemann Martin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Con^uter Science. 

Sum, Ephraim, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Engineering. 

Sunnea, Vivian Thomas, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering. 

Steel, Robert George, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Sutistics. 

Ste«r, Michael B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Conq>uter Engineering. 

Sufanski, Leonard A., Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Stein, Allen Frederick, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Stejskal, Edward O., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Stemloff, Robert Elmer, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Parks, Recreation and Tourism 

Management. 

Stevens, Charles Edward, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Stevens, Jerry B., Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Stewart, Debra Wehrle, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Stewart, Joan Hinde, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Stewart, John Stedman, Ki.D., Research Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Stewart, Tony Kevin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Stewart, William James, Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 

Stiff, Lee V., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Stikeleather, Larry Franklin, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Stiles, Phillip J., Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Stinner, Ronald Edwin, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Stipe, Robert Edwin, M. R. P.gi, Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture. 

Stitzinger, Ernest Lester, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Stoddard, Edward Forrest, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Stomp, Anne-Marie M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Stone, Elizabeth Arnold, D.V.M., Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 

Stone, John Randolph, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Stonecypher, Roy Wesley, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Forestry. 

Stoops, Robert Franklin, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Stoskopf, Michael K., Ph.D., Professor of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine. 

Straus, Stephen K., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public 

Administration. 

Strenkowski, John S., Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Slrocsio, Michael A., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Struble, Raimond Aldrich, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Stubbs, Harriet S., Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Stuber, Charles William, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Genetics. 

Stuckey, William Clifton, Jr., M.S., Professor Emeritus of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Stucky, Jon M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Suggs, Charles Wilson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Suh, Moon Won, Ph.D., Professor of Textile and Apparel Management. 

Sullivan, Craig V., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Sullivan, Gene Autry, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Suth, Gerald D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 



260 



Sutherland, Joseph Gwyn, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Suttle, Jinunie Ray, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Sutton, John C, in, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Sutton, Turner Bond, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Svara, James H., Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Public AdministraUon. 

Swaffield, Jonathan C, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Swain, Ronald L., Ed.D., Adjunct Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Swaisgood, Harold Everett, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Food Science. 

Swallow, William H., Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Swanson, Clifford Richard, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Swanson, Eric S., Ri.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Swartzel, Kenneth Ray, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Food Science. 

Swiss, James Edwin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Switzer, William Lawrence, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Sylla, Edith D., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Tai, Kuo-Chung, Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 

Talley, Banks Cooper, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Counselor Education. 

Tam, Thomas Y., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Tang, Yingchan Edwin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Tarver, Fred Russell, Jr., Ki.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Tatchell, Kelly G., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Microbiology. 

Tate, Lloyd Patrick, Jr., V.M.D., Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Tauber, Michael E., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Tayebali, Akhtarhusein A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Taylor, Andrew J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Taylor, Earl Wayne, B.Arch., Professor Emeritus of Architecture. 

Taylor, James B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Taylor, Raymond G., Jr., Ed.D., Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Tector, John O., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Architecture. 

Temple, Dorota, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Teng, Ching-Sung, Ri.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Teng, Christina T., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Terhaar-Yonkers, Marge, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Tesar, Paul, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture. 

Tharp, Alan Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science. 

Thayer, Gordon Wallace, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Thayer, Paul W., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Theil, Elizabeth C, Ph.D., University Professor of Biochenustry. 

Theil, Michael Herbert, Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Thies-Sprinthall, Lois, Ed.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Thomas, Erik R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Thomas, Frank Bancroft, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Thomas, Judith Fey, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Thomas, L. Todd, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication. 

Thomas, Melvin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Thomas, Richard Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Thompson, Donald Loraine, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Thompson, Jon Francis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Thompson, Maxine Seaborn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Thompson, William F., Ph.D., University Research Professor of Botany. 

Thomson, Randall J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Thome, Jeffrey L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sutistics. 



261 



Thorogood, Robert M., Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Thrall, Donald E., Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology. 

Thurlow, Edwin Gilbert, M.L.A., Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture. 

Thurman, Walter N., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Tilley, David Ronald, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Timothy, David Harry, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Ting, Siu-Man, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Counselor Education. 

Titus, Kimberly Jo, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science. 

Tomalski, Michael D., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Tomasino, Charles, Ki.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Tompkins, Mary B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Tompkins, Wayne A. F., Ki.D., Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Tonelli, Alan Edward, Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Tonkonogy, Susan L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology. 

Toole, William Bell, HI, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Toplikar, Susan M., M.F.A., Associate Professor of Design. 

Tomatzky, Louis G., Ri.D., Adjunct Professor of Psychology. 

Tomow, Walter W., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Psychology. 

Toussaint, William Douglas, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Tove, Shirley R., Hi.D., Adjunct Professor of Microbiology. 

Townsend, J. Keith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Townsend, Scott, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Graphic Design. 

Traer, Mary Elaine, M.LAR., Lecturer in Horticultural Science and Landscape Architecture. 

Tran, HienT., Ri.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Trevino, Jaime, Ki.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Trew, Robert J., Hi.D., Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Triantaphyllou, Anastasios Christos, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Genetics. 

TrianUphyllou, Hedwig Hirschmann, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Troost, Kay Michael, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Troyer, James Richard, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Trussell, Henry Joel, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Tsoulouhas, Theofanis C, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Tucker, Harry, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Tucker, Paul Arthur, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

Tucker, William Preston, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Tung, Chi Chao, Ph.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Turinsky, Paul J., Ph.D., Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Turlik, Iwona, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. 

Turner, Carl Byron, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Turner, Lynn Gilbert, Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Tyler, Pamela, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Ulberg, Karen Jean, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Ulberg, Lester Curtiss, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Ullrich, David Frederick, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Underwood, Herbert A., Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Unrath, Claude Richard, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Upchurch, Robert Gregory, Ph.D., Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Urban, Lori A., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Uyanik, Mehmet Ensar, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Uyttenhove, Hugo Jozef, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Operations Research. 



262 



Uzzell, Odell, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Valadez, James R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Van Camp, Steven D., D.V.M, Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

van der Vaart, E>onald Robert, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Van Der Vaart, Hubertus Robert, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

van der Veer, Hendrick Willem, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Vander Wall, William John, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Vandeveer, Albert Donald, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Van Duyn, John Wey, Ki.D., Philip Morris Professor of Entomology. 

Van Dyke, Cecil Gerald, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Vandenbergh, John Garry, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Vasu, Ellen Storey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Vasu, Michael Lee, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Vaughan, George B., Ph.D., Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Venditti, Richard A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Vepraskas, Michael John, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Verghese, Kuruvilla, Ph.D., Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Vick, Candace Goode, Re.D., Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Vickery, Kenneth Powers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Vincent, Kermeth Steven, Hi.D., Professor of History. 

Viniotis, loannis, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Vivrette, Sally L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Voland, Maurice E., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Volk, Richard James, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Voss, Glenn B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Vouk, Mladen Alan Velimir, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Vukina, Tomislav, Ri.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Wages, Dennis P., D.V.M. , Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

Wagger, Michael Gary, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Wahl, George Henry, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Wahls, Harvey Edward, Ri.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Walberg, Gerald David, Ri.D., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Walden, Michael Leonard, Hi.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Waldvogel, Michael G., Ki.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Walek, Mary Louise, Hi.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Walgenbach, James F., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Wall, John Nelson, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Wallace, James Macauley, m, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Walsh, William Kershaw, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and 

Science. 

Walter, William M., Jr., Ki.D., Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 

Walters, Jeffrey Ray, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Wang, Weijing A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Wang, Youjiang, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and 

Science. 

Ward, Donn R., Ph.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Ward, Michael E., Ed.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Program 

Evaluation. 

Ward, Thomas Marsh, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 

Warren, Frederick Gail, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Warren, Marlin Roger, Jr., Dr. Rec, Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Warren, Stuart L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 



263 



Waschka, Rodney A., H, D.M.A., Assistant Professor of MultidiscipUnary Studies. 

Washburn, Steven P., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Wasik, John Louis, Ed.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Waters, William Meade, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Watson, Gerald Francis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Watson, Larry Wayne, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Wayland, Robert J., Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Wear, David N., Ph.D., Adjunct AssisUnt Professor of Forestry. 

Weber, Jerome Bernard, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Wechsler, Monroe S., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Weed, Sterling Barg, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Weeks, Willard Wesley, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Weeks-Perkins, Beverly Anne, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Microbiology, Pathology, 

and Parasitology and Zoology. 

Wehner, Todd Craig, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Weir, Bruce Spencer, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Statistics. 

Weir, Robert John, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Weissinger, Arthur K., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Welby, Charles William, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Wellman, J. Douglas, Ph.D., Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Wells, J. C, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Wells, Randy, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Wells, Robert Charles, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Welsch, Frank, Dr.Med.Vet, Adjunct Professor of Anatomy, Physiology and Radiology. 

Wenig, Robert Emery, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Wentworth, Thomas Ralph, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Werner, Dennis James, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Wemsman, Earl Allen, Ri.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Crop Science. 

Wertz, Dennis William, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Wesler, Oscar, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

Wessels, Walter John, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

West, Harry Carter, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

West, Harvey Alexander, II, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Materials Science and 

Engineering. 

Westbrook, Bert Whitley, Ed.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Westbrook, Susan Love, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Westerman, Philip Wayne, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Weston, William David, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of University Administration. 

Weybrew, Joseph Arthur, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Whaley, Wilson Monroe, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and 

Science. 

Whangbo, Myung Hwan, Ki.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Wheatley, John H. (Jack), Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Wheeler, Elisabeth Anne, Ph.D., Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Wheeler, Mary Elizabeth, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History. 

Whetten, Ross W., Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Whisnant, Richard Austin, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Whitacre, Michael D., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Food Animal and Equine Medicine. 

WhiUker, Thomas Burton, Hi.D., Professor (USDA) of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

White, Mark W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

White, Raymond Cyrus, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 



264 



White, Robert Ernest, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Whitfield, John Kerr, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Whitlow, Lon Weidner, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Whitten, Jerry Lynn, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Wiegmann, Brian Michael, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Wiener, Russell W., Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Wilchins, Susan Dowman, M.F.A., Professor of Design. 

Wilcut, John W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Willc, John Clark, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science. 

Wilkerson, Gail Geier, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Wilkinson, Richard R., M.L.A., Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Williams, C. Michael, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Williams, Charles Kenneth, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering. 

Williams, Gareth, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Williams, James Oliver, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Public Administration. 

Williams, Joel Lawson, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Williams, Mary Cameron, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Williams, Paul F., Ph.D., Professor of Accounting. 

Williams, Porter Jr., M.A., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Williams, Robert T., Ed.D., Lecturer of Educational Leadership and Program Evaluation. 

Williamson, James Claude, Jr., M.S., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Williamson, John D., Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Williamson, Norman Francis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Computer Science. 

Willis, William Edward, Jr., Ph.D., Lecturer and Associate Provost for Academic Computing. 

Willils, Daniel Hoover, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Wilson, Arthur L., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 

Wilson, Beth Evelyn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Wilson, Jack W., Ph.D., Professor of Liberal Studies. 

Wilson, James Reed, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Wilson, Lorenzo George, Ki.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Wilson, Mark Alan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Wilson, Richard Ferrol, Ph.D., Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Wimberley, Ronald Coleman, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Winchester, Samuel C, Jr., Ph.D., Klopman Distinguished Professor of Textile and Apparel 

Management. 

Wineland, Michael J., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Science. 

Winstead, Nash Nicks, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Winston, Hubert Melvin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Wise, Farrell C, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Wise, George Herman, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Wiser, Edward Hempstead, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Wishy, Bernard W., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History. 

Witt, Mary Ann, Frese, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Wogalter, Michael S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Wohlgenant, Michael K., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Wolcott, Donna Lee, Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 

Sciences. 

Wolcott, Thomas G., Ph.D., Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Wolfram, Walter Andrew, Ph.D., William C. Friday Distinguished Professor of English. 

Wollenzien, Paul L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 



265 



Wollum, Arthur George, II, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Wood, Denis, Ph.D., Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

Woodbum, James, D.Eng., Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Woodman, James Nelson, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Woodrum, Eric M., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Worsham, Arch Douglas, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Wortman, Jimmie Jack, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Wright, Charles Gerald, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

Wu, Jy S., Ph.D., Interinstitutioiial Adjunct Graduate Faculty Member in Civil Engineering . 

Wu, Shyhtsun Felix, Ph.D., AssisUnt Professor of Computer Science. 

Wynne, Johnny Calvin, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Wyrick, Deborah Baker, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Xie, Lian, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

Xu, Xiaoli, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

Yelverton, Fred Hinnant, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Yim, Man-Sung, Ki.D., Assistant Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

York, Alan Clarence, Ph.D., Professor of Crop Science. 

Young, Clyde Thomas, Hi.D., Professor of Food Science. 

Young, Eric, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Young, Gregory S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Management. 

Young, James Herbert, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Young, James Neal, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Young, Robert E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Young, Robert Vaughan, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Yuan, Fuh-Gwo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Zaghloul, Atef O., Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Zahn, Margaret A., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Zeiger, Donald Carl, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. 

21eng, Shaobang, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Zering, Kelly Douglas, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Zia, Paul Zung-Teh, Ri.D., Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. 

Zikry, Mohammed A., Ri.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Zimmer, Catherine Roberts, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Zingraff, Matthew Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Zobel, Bruce John, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

2Londemiann, David A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Zomer, Paul Steffen, Ph.D., Adjunct Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Zorowski, Carl Frank, Hi.D., R. J. Reynolds Industries Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Zublena, Joseph P., Ph.D., Professor of Soil Science. 

Zuckerman, Gilroy Joel, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting. 

Zumwalt, Lloyd Robert, Hi.D., Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Engineering. 



266 



The University of North Carolina 

Sixteen Constituent Institutions 



C. D. Spangler Jr., B.S., M.B. A., President 

Roy Carroll, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Judith Pulley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for Planning 

Nathan F. Simms Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President for Student Services and Special 

Programs 
William O. McCoy, B.S., M.S., Vice President for Finance 
Jasper D. Memory, B.S., Ph.D., Vice President for Research and Public Service 
Gary T. Barnes, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for Program Assessment and Public 

Service 
David G. Martin, B.A., LL.B., Vice President for Public Affairs 
Rosalind R. Fuse-Fall, B.A., J.D., Secretary of the University 
Richard H. Robinson Jr., A.B., LL.B., Assistant to the President 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
The University of North Carolina 



D. Samuel Neill, Chairman 
Joseph E. Thomas, Vice Chairman 
Benjamin S. Ruffin, Secretary 

Class of 1997 

G. Irvin Aldridge, Manteo 
Mark L. Bibbs, Chapel HiU 
Lois G. Britt, Mount Olive 
John F. A. V. Cecil, Asheville 
Bert Collins, Durham 
John A. Garwood, North Wilkesboro 
Wallace N. Hyde, Raleigh 
Jack P. Jordan, Mount Gilead 
Ellen A. Newbold, Rose HiU 
Maxine H. O'Kelley, Burlington 
D. Wayne Peterson, Wake Forest 
H. D. Reaves Jr., FayetteviUe 
Harold H. Webb, RaUigh 



Class of 1999 

F. Edward Broadwell Jr. , Asheville 
Robert J. Brown, High Point 
William T. Brown, FayetteviUe 
C. Clifford Cameron, Charlotte 
Derick S. Close, Charlotte 
Orville D. Coward Sr., Sylva 
John C. Fennebresque, Charlotte 
Lannie G. Horton Sr., Raleigh 
C. Ralph Kinsey Jr., Charlotte 
Helen Rhyne Marvin, Gastonia 
W. Kenneth Morgan Sr. , Jacksonville 
Gary C. Owen, Asheville 
Barbara S. Perry, Kinston 
Earl N. Phillips Jr., High Point 
Marshall A. Rauch, G&stonia 
Paul J. Rizzo, Chapel HiU 



Ex-officio 

Keith Bryant, Greensboro 



Members Emeriti (Terms Expire 1999) 

James E. Holshouser Jr. , Southern Pines 
Samuel H. Poole, Raleigh 



161 



History of the University of North Carolina 

In North Carolina, all the public educational institutions that grant baccalaureate degrees are 
part of the University of North Carolina. North Carolina State University is one of 16 
constituent institutions of the multi-campus state university. 

The University of North Carolina, chartered by the N.C. General Assembly in 1789, was 
the first public university in the United States to open its doors and the only one to graduate 
students in the eighteenth century. The first class was admitted in Chapel Hill in 1795. For 
the next 136 years, the only campus of the University of North Carolina was at Chapel Hill. 

In 1877, the N.C. General Assembly began sponsoring additional institutions of higher 
education, diverse in origin and purpose. Five were historically black institutions, and 
another was founded to educate American Indians. Several were created to prepare teachers 
for the public schools. Others had a technological emphasis. One is a training school for 
performing artists. 

In 1931, the N.C. General Assembly redefined the University of North Carolina to include 
three state-supported institutions: the campus at Chapel Hill (now the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill), North Carolina State College (now North Carolina State University 
at Raleigh), and Woman's College (now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro). 
The new multi-campus University operated with one board of trustees and one president. By 
1969, three additional campuses had joined the University through legislative action: the 
University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and 
the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. 

In 1971, the General Assembly passed legislation bringing into the University of North 
Carolina the state's ten remaining public senior institutions, each of which had until then 
been legally sq)arate: Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, Elizabeth City 
State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University, North Carolina Central University, the North Carolina School of the Arts, 
Pembroke State University, Western Carolina University, and Winston-Salem State Univer- 
sity. This action created the current 16-campus University. (In 1985, the North Carolina 
School of Science and Mathematics, a residential high school for gifted students, was 
declared an affiliated school of the University). 

The UNC Board of Governors is the policy-making body legally charged with "the general 
determination, control, supervision, management, and governance of all affairs, of the 
constituent institutions." It elects the president, who administers the University. The 32 
voting members of the Board of Governors are elected by the General Assembly for four- 
year terms. Former board chairmen and board members who are former governors of North 
Carolina may continue to serve for limited periods as non-voting members emeriti. The 
president of the UNC Association of Student Governments, or that student's designee, is also 
a non-voting member. 

Each of the 16 constituent institutions is headed by a chancellor, who is chosen by the Board 
of Governors on the president's nomination and is responsible to the president. Each 
institution has a board of trustees, consisting of eight members elected by the Board of 



268 



Governors, four appointed by the governor, and the president of the student body, who 
saves ex-officio. (The NC School of the Arts has two additional ex-officio members.) Each 
board of trustees holds extensive powers over academic and other operations of its institu 
tion on delegation from the Board of Governors. 



Historical Sketch of North Carolina State University 

On March 7, 1887, the North Carolina General Assembly passed the act which authorized 
the establishment of the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. The 
Watauga Club of Raleigh and the statewide fanners' movement had convinced the legislature 
of the need to transfer the funds received by the state under the provisions of the Morrill 
Land-Grant Act of 1862 from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill to a new land- 
grant college in Raleigh. The cornerstone of A. and M. College was laid in August, 1888, 
and its doors were officially opened on October 3, 1889. 

Alexander Q. Holladay, the college's first president (1889-1899), and a faculty of five 
offered courses in agriculture, horticulture, pure and agricultural chemistry, English, 
bookkeeping, history, mathematics, physics, practical mechanics and military science. The 
first fiieshman class numbered about fifty students. By the end of the institution's first decade 
the resident enrollment had reached 300. 

During the administration of George T. Winston (1899-1908) a new curriculum in textiles 
was developed and normal courses were offered in the summer for public school teachers, 
both men and women. The Agricultural Extension Service was established during the 
administration of Daniel H. Hill (1908-1916) and enrollment grew to more than 700. In 
1917, during the administration of Wallace C. Riddick (1916-1923), the institution's name 
was changed to North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering. The 
introduction of the word engineering was intended to reflect the increasing emphasis on the 
professional and theoretical as well as the practical aspects of technical education. 

In 1923 a major reorganization of the administration of the college was begun, and President 
Riddick resigned to become the first dean of the new School of Engineering. Eugene Clyde 
Brooks (1923-1934), the fifth president of State College, continued the reorganization with 
the creation of the School of Agriculture (later renamed the School of Agriculture and 
Forestry), the School of Science and Business, the School of Education, the School of 
Textiles and the Graduate School. Resident enrollment rose to nearly 2,000 in 1929 before 
the Depression caused a drop to approximately 1,500 in 1933. The first women graduates 
of State College received their degrees in 1927. 

In the midst of the Depression, the General Assembly of 1931 attempted to promote economy 
and to prevent unnecessary duplication among the three leading state institutions of higher 
education by establishing a single consolidated administration for the University of North 
Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State CoUege of Agriculture and Engineering, and 
North Carolina College for Women in Greensboro. Dr. Frank Porter Graham, president of 
the University of North Carolina, was elected president of the consolidated university, and 
Dr. Brooks, with the title of vice president, continued as chief administrative officer at State 
College. Among the consequences of consolidation were the phasing out of the School of 



269 



Engineering at Chapel Hill and the School of Science and Business at Raleigh. A general 
college, later called the Basic Division, was established to provide two years of basic courses 
in hunmnities, social sciences and natural sciences as a foundation for students in the various 
degree-granting technical and professional schools. 

Colonel John W. Harrelson (1934-1953), Class of 1909, was the first alumnus to become 
administrative head of State College. Under the consolidated organization his title was Dean 
of Administration; later it was changed to Chancellor. During Harrelson's administration the 
institution experienced the beginning of extraordinary growth in the aftermath of World War 
n. Two new schools were established: the School of Design and the School of Forestry. A 
multi-million doUar expansion program was completed during the administration of Carey 
H. Bostian (1953-1959), and the program of student activities was greatly enlarged, as the 
enrollment passed 5,000. 

The faculty and student population more than doubled during the administration of John T. 
Caldwell (1959-1975) and another new school was organized: the School of Physical 
Sciences and Applied Mathematics (now Physical and Mathematical Sciences). The School 
of General Studies, the successor to the Basic Division, was renamed the School of Liberal 
Arts and was authorized to offer a full range of bachelor's and master's degree programs in 
the humanities and social sciences. The name of the institution itself was changed in 1965 
to North Carolina State University, signifying its new role as a comprehensive university. 

NCSU's enrollment passed 20,000 during the administration of Chancellor Joab L. Thomas 
(1976-1981). The School of Veterinary Medicine was established, the name of the School 
of Liberal Arts was changed to School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and North 
Carolina State University was recognized as one of two major research universities within 
the statewide University of North Carolina. 

Bruce R. Poulton (1982-1990) became chancellor in the fall of 1982. A major expansion of 
the University's research budget, the establishment of a substantial endowment to provide 
enlarged resources for research equipment and endowed professorships, and the addition of 
the 1,000-acre Centennial Campus occurred during this administration. All of the schools 
were renamed colleges except for the School of Design and The Graduate School. In 
addition, the School of Education became the College of Education and Psychology. 

In 1990 Larry K. Monteith, an alumnus and former Dean of the College of Engineering, 
became chancellor and NCSU's eleventh chief administrative officer. Among his early 
initiatives were the creation of the Division of Undergraduate Studies and the First Year 
Experience Program. The College of TextUes and ABB (Asea Brown Boveri), NCSU's first 
corporate partner, moved to Centennial Campus in 1991. In 1992, the College of Manage- 
ment was established. 



270 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
North Carolina State University 

Keith R. Harrod, Raleigh, Chairman 

Annabelle L. Fetterman, Clinton, Vice Chairman 

William A. Klopman, Greensboro, Vice Chairman 

Smedes York, Raleigh, Secretary 

Hoyt Q. Bailey, Shelby 

W. Steven Edwards, Raleigh 

Flora Hull Grantham, Smithfield 

Edward E. Hood, Stamford, CT 

Vernon Malone, Raleigh 

WendeU H. Murphy, Rose HiU 

Robert N. Spilman, Bassett, VA 

H. E. Wilson Jr., Burlington 

Ex-ofTicio 
John C. O'Quinn, President, Student Government, NCSU 

Mission of North Carolina State University 

The unique mission of North Carolina State University is to serve the citizens of North 
Carolina as the State's only research university in the land-grant tradition. Since its founding 
in 1887, NCSU has been committed to science and technology as pathways to human 
betterment and has served as an innovative educational resource, providing leadership for 
positive intellectual, social, and technological change. Faithful to its founding mission, the 
University must now meet the challenges posed by the increasing complexity of our global 
society and the accelerated growth in knowledge and technology. At the same time, it must 
continually address the effects of these developments on the environment and on the social 
and economic well-being of the people of North Carolina, the nation, and the world. Spurred 
by these new challenges, NCSU will continue to fulfill its mission through the integrated 
fiinctions of teaching, research, and extension, its unique form of public service. 

Teaching, research, and public service will continue to be mutually enriching enterprises at 
NCSU. The activities of research and extension interact to provide students with an 
environment for learning that stresses creativity, problem solving, social responsibility, and 
respect for human diversity. The educational and extension functions join to apply, test, and 
disseminate the new knowledge generated by research. 

During the University's first hundred years, its distinctive mandate has led to preeminence 
in science, technology, and engineering. This mandate will continue to shape future 
development, necessitating excellence in the full spectrum of disciplines that provide the 
intellectual and critical foundations for understanding, anticipating, and responding to public 
needs. 

Undergraduate education is a major resp>onsibility of North Carolina State University. Core 
education is provided in science and the humanities, with specializations offered in physical, 
social, and life sciences, in the humanities, and in professional and technical disciplines. The 

271 



atmosphere of a research university provides distinctive opportunities for undergraduates to 
benefit from the experience of research in the classroom, laboratory, and informal settings. 
Exposure to the discovery and synthesis of new information provides students with a basis 
for identifying and solving society's problems and builds a critical foundation for their 
personal growth, cultural enrichment, and professional development. 

As a national center for doctoral studies, NCSU embraces the responsibility to maintain 
excellence in graduate research and education. Students work as partners with faculty in the 
creation, expansion, conservation, and transmission of knowledge. Graduate education will 
continue to evolve as the University builds on its traditional and preeminent strengths in 
science, technology, and engineering and as it develops further strengths in complementary 
disciplines. 

Research and scholarly inquiry form the foundation for education and public service at 
NCSU. Faculty and students in all disciplines engage in the art and science of discovery in 
a climate of firee inquiry and creativity, extending the boundaries of knowledge and horizons 
of human intellect. The research mandate of NCSU is signified in its national classification 
as a Research University I. 

The University's land-grant philosophy is manifest in its commitment to active stewardship 
of the human and natural resources of the State. NCSU has been an integral part of 
significant economic and technological changes in North Carolina for the past one hundred 
years. This stewardship is expressed currently through public service activities in all the 
University's colleges and schools, whereby the expertise resident among the faculty and 
students is disseminated across the State through extension, technical assistance, professional 
development, lifelong education, and technology transfer programs. Loyal to the vision of 
its founders in the nineteenth century, NCSU will continue to strive through extension and 
public service to improve the quality of life for North Carolinians into the twenty-first 
century. 

NCSU' 8 dual designations as land-grant university and a Research University I form the 
basis for the unique role of NCSU in The University of North Carolina. North Carolina State 
University stands on the threshold of a new century with deep appreciation for the 
significance of these mandates and the conunitment to excellence and change that they jointly 
require. 

Accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

NCSU is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools to award the associate, baccalaureate, master's and doctoral degrees. 



272 



Policy on Illegal Drugs 

The following policy on illegal drugs was adopted by the North Carolina State University 
Board of Trustees on April 16, 1988: 

PURPOSE 

Reflecting its concern over the threat which illegal drugs constitute to higher education 
communities, the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina adopted a policy 
on illegal drugs on January 15, 1988. The Board of Governors' policy requires each 
constitu- ent institution's Board of Trustees to develop a policy on illegal drugs applicable 
to all students, faculty members, administrators, and other employees. The policy for each 
campus must address particular circumstances and needs while being fully consistent with 
specified minimum requirements for enforcement and penalties. 

To assist North Carolina State University in its continuing efforts to meet the threat of illegal 
drugs, and to comply with the Board of Governors' policy, the Board of Trustees adopts the 
policy set forth below. This policy is intended to demonstrate the University's primary 
commitment to education, counseling, rehabilitation, and elimination of illegal drugs, as well 
as its determination to impose penalties in the event of violation of state and federal drug 
laws consistent with all due process protection rights. 

EDUCATION, COUNSELING AND REHABILITATION 

North Carolina State University shall maintain a program of education designed to help all 
members of the University community avoid involvement with Ulegal drugs. The educational 
program shall emphasize the incompatibility of the use or sale of illegal drugs with the goals 
of the University, the legal consequences of involvement with illegal drugs, the medical and 
psychological implications of the use of illegal drugs, and the ways in which illegal drugs 
jeopardize an individual's present accomplishments and future opportunities. Specific 
elements of the education program are: 

1. Publicizing the University's policy in the Student Code of Conduct, the undergraduate 
and graduate catalogs, and other publications distributed to students, faculty, administrators, 
and other employees. The latter publications include the official bulletin, the Student Hand- 
book, the Faculty Handbook, the Advisers' Handbook, and the Human Resources newsletter. 

2. Continuing and expanding the drug education program conducted by Student Health 
Service. 

3. Continuing development of courses on drug education. 

4. Continuing the drug education component of the employees' Wellness Program. 

5. Increasing the awareness and utilization of the University's Employee Assistance 
Program (EAP). 

The University shall disseminate information about drug counseling and rehabilitation 
services that are available to members of the University community. Persons who voluntar- 
ily avail themselves of such services shall be assured that applicable professional standards 
of confidentiality wUl be observed and that such participation will not be the basis for 
disciplinary action. Specific counseling and rehabilitation efforts include: 



273 



1. Continuing the evaluation and referral services of the Counseling Center for out-patient 
and in-patient rehabilitation. 

2. Continuing the consultation and evaluation portions of the Student Health Service's drug 
education program. 

3. Utilizing the Employee Assistance Program's referral to existing community-based 
counseling and rehabilitation services. 

ENFORCEMENT AND PENALTIES 

Students, faculty members, administrators, and other employees are responsible, as citizens, 
for knowing about and complying with the provisions of North Carolina law that make it a 
crime to possess, sell, deliver, or manufacture those drugs designated collectively as 
"controlled substances" in Article 5 of Chapter 90 of the North Carolina General Statutes. 
The University will initiate its own disciplinary proceedings against a student, faculty 
member, administrator, or other employee when the offense is deemed to affect the interests 
of the University. Penalties will be imposed by the University in accordance with procedural 
safeguards applicable to disciplinary actions against students, faculty members, administra- 
tors, and other employees, as required by Section 502D (3) and Section 603 of the University 
Code, by Board of Governors' policies applicable to other employees exempt from the State 
Personnel Act, and by regulations of the State Personnel Commission. The penalties to be 
imposed by the University may range from written warnings with probationary status to 
expulsions from enrollment and discharges from employment. However, the following mini- 
mum paialties, as prescribed by the Board of Governors, shall be imposed for the particular 
offenses described. 

Trafficking in Illegal Drugs 

1. For the illegal manufacture, sale or delivery, or possession with intent to manufacture, 
sell or deliver, of any controlled substance identified in Schedule 1, N.C. General Statutes 
90-89, or Schedule 11, N.C. General Statutes 90-90 (including, but not limited to, heroin, 
mescaline, lysergic acid diethylsmide, opium, cocaine, amphetamine, methoqualine), any 
student shall be expelled and any faculty member, administrator or other employee shall be 
discharged. 

2. For a first offense involving the illegal manufacture, sale or delivery, or possession with 
intent to manufacture, sell or deliver, of any controlled substance identified in Schedules III 
through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91 through 90-94 (including, but not limited to, 
marijuana, phenobarbital, codeine), the minimum penalty shall be suspension from enroll- 
ment or fmm employment for a period of at least one semester or its equivalent.* (•Employees 

subject to the State Personnel Act are governed by regulations of the State Personnel Commission. Because the 
mtnimiim penalty specified in this section and required by the Board of Governors exceeds the m a xim u m period of 
suspension without pay that is permitted by the State Personnel Commission regulations, the penalty for a first offense 
for anployees subject to the Stole Personnel Act is discharge.) For a second offensC, any Student shall be 

expelled and any faculty member, administrator, or other employee shall be dis-charged. 

Illegal Possession of Drugs 

1. For a first offense involving the illegal possession of any controlled substance identified 
in Schedule I, N. C. General Statutes 90-89, or Schedule II, N.C. General Statutes 90-90, 
the minimum penalty shall be suspension from enrollment or from employment for a period 
of at least one semester or its equivalent.* (See • above.) 

2. For a first offense involving the illegal possession of any controlled substance identified 
in Schedules III through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91 through 90-94, the minimum 



274 



penalty shall be probation, for a period to be determined on a case-by-case basis. A person 
on probation must agree to participate in a drug education and counseling program, consent 
to regular drug testing, and accept such other conditions and restrictions, including a 
program of community service, as the Chancellor or the Chancellor's designee deems 
appropriate. Refusal or failure to abide by the terms of probation shall result in suspension 
from enroll- ment or from employment for any unexpired balance of the prescribed period 
of probation. 

3. For second or other subsequent offenses involving the illegal possession of controlled 
substance, progressively more severe penalties shall be imposed, including expulsion of 
students and discharge of faculty members, administrators or other employees. 

SUSPENSION PENDING FINAL DISPOSITION 

When a student, faculty member, administrator, or other employee has been charged by the 
University with a violation of policies concerning illegal drugs, he or she may be suspended 
fiom enrollment or employment before initiation or completion of regular disciplinary proc- 
eedings if, assuming the truth of the charges, the Chancellor or, in the Chancellor's absence, 
the Chancellor's designee concludes that the person's continued presence within the 
University community would constitute a clear and immediate danger to the health or welfare 
of other members of the University community; provided, that if such a suspension is im- 
posed, an appropriate hearing of the charges against the suspended person shall be held as 
promptly as possible thereafter. 

COORDINATOR OF DRUG EDUCATION 

The University Counsel will serve as coordinator of drug education and, acting under the 
authority of the Chancellor, will be responsible for overseeing all action and programs 
relating to this institutional policy. 

IMPLEMENTATION AND REPORTING 

This North Carolina State University policy on illegal drugs was effective on the beginning 
of the fall semester of 1988. 

Annually the Chancellor shall submit to the Board of Trustees a report on campus activities 
related to illegal drugs for the preceding year. The report shall include, as a minimum, the 
following: (1) a listing of the major education activities conducted during the year; (2) a 
report on any illegal drug-related incidents, including any sanctions imposed; (3) an assess- 
ment by the Chancellor of the effectiveness of the campus program; and (4) any proposed 
changes in the policy on illegal drugs. A copy of the report shall be provided to the 
President. 



275 



ETOEX 



Academic computing facilities, 55 

Academic standing, Grading and, 20 

Academic warning, probation and termination, 22 

Accounting, 77 

Administration, North Carolina State University, 4 

Administration, University of North Carolina, 267 

Administrative Board of the Graduate School, 5 

Admission, 14-19; FuU graduate standing, 15; Provisional admission, 15; Graduate 

unclassified status, 16; Post-baccalaureate Studies (PBS), 17 
Adult and Community College Education, 78 

Advisory Committee, Graduate, Master's degrees, 40; Doctoral degrees, 47 
Aerospace Engineering, see Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 
African-American Graduate Assistance Grant, 32 
Agricultural Economics, see Economics 
Agricultiral and Extension Education, 81 
Agricultural Education, see Agricultural and Extension Education for M.S. and Curriculum 

and Instruction for Master of Education 
Agriculture, 82 

Alumni Association Graduate Fellowship Supplements, 32 
Animal Science, 83 
Anthropology, 209 

Applications, general, 14; Fee, 14; International, 14 
Applied Mathematics, see Mathematics 
Architecture, 84 
Artificial Intelligence, 209 

Assistantships, Eligibility for, fellowships or traineeships, 22 
Assistantships, Fellowships and graduate, 30 
Audits, 23; Fee, 25 

B 

Basic Graduate School Requirements, 75 

Biochemistry, 86 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering, 88 

Biological Sciences, 210 

Biology Field Laboratory, 56 

Bio mathematics, 89 

Biomedical Engineering, 210 

Biotechnology, 211 

Board of Governors, UNC, 267 

Board of Trustees, NCSU, 271 

Botany, 91 

Business Management, 212 



276 



Calendar, 6 

Campus map, 286-287 

Candidacy, doctoral, 50 

Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing (AEMP), 56 

Center for Aseptic Processing and Packaging Studies (CAPPS), 56 

Center for Advanced Computing and Communication, 57 

Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes, 57 

Center for Learning Technologies, 57 

Center for Research and Development in Mathematics and Science Education, 57 

Center for Research in Scientific Computation, 57 

Center for Sound and Vibration, 58 

Certificate renewal, public school, 19 

Chemical Engineering, 93 

Chemistry, 94 

Civil Engineering, 96 

Code of Student Conduct, 3 

College of Engineering professional degree program, 18 

Co-major, Master's degrees, 42; Doctoral degrees, 48 

Communication, 213 

Comprehensive final oral examinations, 43 

Comprehensive written examinations. Master's degrees, 43 

Computational Engineering and Sciences, 213 

Computer Engineering, see Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Computer Science, 99 

Computing facilities, academic, 55 

Continuous registration, 22 

Cooperative education program, 26 

Cooperating Raleigh Colleges, 18 

Copyright Procedures, University Patent and, 65 

Counselor Education, 102 

Course descriptions, 76 

Course load, 20 

Credit by examination, 41 

Credit by extension, 41 

Credit from outside sources, 41 

Credit from previous NCSU master's degree, 42 

Credits, Master's degrees, 40 

Crop Science, 103 

Curriculum and Instruction, 106 



Deadlines for theses, see Calendar 
Departmental fellowships, 31 
Design, 214 

Diagnostic Teaching Clinic, 58 
Diploma order request cards, 23 



277 



Dissertation requirement, Doctoral degrees, 52 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education degrees, 47-53; Advisory committee and 
plan of graduate work, 47; Co-major, 48; Microfilming, 51; Fees, 25; Residence 
requir«nent, 48; Language requirements, 49; Preliminary comprehensive examina- 
tions, 49; Candidacy, 50; Final oral examination, 51; Dissertation, 52; Time limit, 
52; Summary of procedures, 52 

Drop dates for minicourses, 20 



Ecology, 214 

Economics, 108 

Education [General courses], 214 

Educational Administration and Supervision, see Adult and Community College Education 

Educational Research and Policy Analysis, see Adult and Community College Education 

Electric Power Research Center, 58 

Electrical and Computer Engineering, 110 

Electrical Engineering, see Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Elementary Education, see Curriculum and Instruction 

Electron microscope facilities, 59 

Eligibility for assistantships, fellowships or traineeships, 22 

Emergency loans, short-term, 35 

Engineering, 114 

Engineering [General courses], 214 

Engineering professional degree program, College of, 18 

English, 114 

English Education, see Curriculum and Instruction 

Entomology, 117 

Evening degree programs, 18 

Examination requirements, Master's degrees, 43; Doctoral degrees, 51 

Extension, Credit by, 41 



Faculty, Graduate, 222 

Federal Stafford loans, 34 

Fees, see Tuition and Fees 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships, 30; Research and teaching assistantships, 30; 

Departmental fellowships, 31; National, regional and foundation fellowships, 31 
Fiber and Polymer Science, 119 

Fields of instruction, 72; Fields offering graduate degrees, 72 
Final oral examinations. Master's degrees, 43; Doctoral degrees, 51 
Financial Aid, 34-35; Long-term loans, 34; Federal Stafford Loans, 34; Work-study Jobs, 

35; Part-time jobs, 35; Short-term emergency loans, 35 
Financial Support for Graduate Students, 30-36; Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships, 

30; Research and Teaching Assistantships, 30; Graduate School Fellowships, 32; 

Other Financial Aid, 34; Military Education and Training, 35 
Food Science, 121 
Foreign Languages and Literatures, 215 

278 



Forestry, 123 

Full graduate standing, 15 

Full-time faculty and employees, 26 



General information, 14 

Genetics, 125 

Governors, Board of, UNC, 267 

Grades, 20 

Grading and academic standing, 20 

Graduate advisor and graduate advisory committee. Master's degrees, 40 

Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need, 32 

Graduate credit for seniors, 23 

Graduate Faculty, 222 

Graduate programs, 39-53; Master's degrees, 39; Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of 
Education degrees, 47 

Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) scores, 14 

Graduate School Fellowships, 32-34; African-American Graduate Assistance Grant, 32; 
Alumni Association Graduate Fellowship Supplements, 32; Graduate Assistance 
in Areas of National Need, 32; Incentive Scholarship and Grant Program for 
Native Americans (ISGPNA), 33; Jerry J. Collier Scholarship, 33; Minority 
Presence Grant Program, 33; National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate 
Research Traineeships, 33; Patricia Roberts Harris Graduate Fellowships, 33 

Graduate School Registrations (GR), 215 

Graduate School requirements, Basic, 75-76; Basic requirements for admission, 75; Basic 
requirements for Master's degrees, 75; Basic requirements for Doctoral degrees, 
75 

Graduate School, North Carolina State University, 13 

Graduate Student Association, 13 

Graduate-unclassified status, 16; Special graduate-unclassified status for international student 
visitors, 16 

Graduation, 23 Diploma order request cards, 23 

Graphic Design, 127 

H 

Health insurance, 37 

Health Occupations Teacher Education, see Adult and Community College Education 

Health Services, 36 

Higher Education Administration, see Adult and Community College Education 

Highlands Biological Station, 60 

History, 129 

History of the University of North Carolina, 268 

Historical Sketch of North Carolina State University, 269 

Horticultural Science, 132 

Housing, 37; off-campus housing, 37; Edward S. King Village, 37; on-campus housing, 37 



279 



I 

Illegal Drugs, Policy on, 273 

Immunization records, Medical history and, 16 

Immunology, 134 

Incentive Scholarship and Grant Program for Native Americans (ISGPNA), 33 

Incomplete grades, 21 

Industrial Design, 135 

Industrial Engineering, 137 

Institute of Statistics, 55 

Institutes, 54 

Instructional Technology - Computers, see Curriculum and Instruction 

Insurance, Health, 37 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering, 139 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute, 60 

Interinstitutional registration, 19 

International area studies groups, 64 

International Development, Technology for, 141 

International students, 14; application, 14; admission, 14; insurance (see Health Services); 

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), 14 
International student visitors, Special graduate-unclassified status for, 16 



Jerry J. CoUier Scholarship, 33 

K 

King Village, Edward S., 37 

L 

Landscape Architecture, 142 

Language requirements, Master's degrees, 42; Doctoral degrees, 49 
Learning Resources Library, 61 
Liberal Studies, 144 
Libraries, NC State, 54 
Library, D. H. HiU, 54 
Life Sciences, 144 

Loans, 34-35; Long-term loans, 34; Federal Stafford loans, 34; Short-term emergency loans, 
35 

M 

Major Fields of Study, 77 

Management, 145 

Map of campus, 286-287 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, 147 

Mars Mission Research Center, 61 



280 



Master of Engineering, see Engineering 

Master's degrees, 39-47; Master of Science and Master of Arts, 39; Master's Degree in a 
Designated Field, 39; Requirements for Master's Degrees, 39; Graduate advisory 
committee, 40; Plan of graduate work, 40; Credits, 40; Minor, 42; Co-major, 42 
Language requirements, 42; Thesis, 43; Comprehensive written examinations, 43 
Comprehensive final oral examinations, 43; Residence, 44; Time limit, 44 
Summary of procedures for Master's degrees, 45 

Materials Science and Engineering, 151 

Materials Research Center, 61 

Mathematics, 153 

Mathematics and Science Education, 156 

Mathematics Education, see Mathematics and Science Education 

MCNC, 61 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 159 

Mechanical Engineering, see Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Medical history and immunization records, 16 

Microbiology, 162 

Microfilming fee for doctoral dissertation, 25 

Middle Grades Education, see Curriculum and Instruction 

Military education and training, 35 

Minicourses, Drop dates for, 20 

Minor and Other Organized Programs of Study, 209 

Minor, Master's degrees, 42; Doctoral degrees, 47 

Minority Presence Grant Program, 33 

Mission of North Carolina State University, 271 

Multidisciplinary Studies, see Liberal Studies 

N 

National, regional and foundation fellowships, 31 

National Science Foundation (NSF^ Graduate Research Traineeships, 33 

Natural Resources Administration, 164 

Nondiscrimination statement, 3 

Non-thesis programs. Students in, summary, 45 

North Carolina State University, 1; Administration, 4; Historical Sketch, 269; Board of 

Trustees, 271; Mission of, 271 
North Carolina, University of, 267; Board of Governors, 267; History of, 268 
Nuclear Engineering, 165 
Nuclear Reactor Program, 61 
Nutrition, 167 



Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Research program at the, 64 

Occupational Education, see Mathematics and Science Education 

Organization fo Tropical Studies, 62 

Operations Research, 168 

Option B programs, 39; Students in Option B programs summary, 45 



281 



Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, 171 

Patent and Copyright Procedures, University, 65 

Part-time jobs, 35 

Patricia Roberts Harris Graduate Fellowships, 33 

PBS, see post-baccalaureate studies 

Pest Management, 216 

Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory, 62 

Philosophy, 216 

Physics, 172 

Physiology, 174 

Phytotron, 63 

Plan of graduate work. Master's degrees, 40; Doctoral degrees, 47 

Plant Pathology, 175 

Plant Physiology, 217 

Policy on Illegal Drugs, 273 

Political Science, 177 

Post-baccalaureate Studies (PBS), 17 

Poultry Science, 179 

Precision Engineering Center, 63 

Preliminary comprehensive examinations, Doctoral degrees, 49 

Probation, academic, 22 

Programs of Study; Major Fields of Study, 77; Minor and Other Organized Programs of 

Study, 209 
Provisional admission, 15 
Psychoeducational Clinic and Laboratories, 63 
Psychology, 180 
Public Administration, 183 
Public History, see History 



Reading, see Curriculum and Instruction 

Refund of tuition and fees, 26 

Registration and Records, 19-24; Interinstitutional registration, 19; Course load, 20; Grading 

and academic standing, 20; Continuous registration, 22; Seniors, 23; Audits, 23; 

Graduation, 23 
Registration, Continuous, 22 
Research and Teaching Assistantships, 30 
Research Program at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, 64 
Research Triangle, 54 

Residence requirements. Master's degrees, 44; Doctoral degrees, 48 
Residence status for tuition purposes, 27 
Rural Sociology, see Sociology and Anthropology 



282 



Science Education, see Mathematics and Science Education 

Sea Grant College Program, 63 

Second master's in the same field, 42 

Seniors, graduate credit for, 23 

Short-term emergency loans, 35 

Social Studies Education, see Curriculum and Instruction 

Sociology and Anthropology, 185 

Soil Science, 187 

Solid State Sciences, 218 

Southeastern Plant Environmental Laboratories— Phytotron, 63 

Special Education, see Curriculum and Instruction 

Special laboratories, facilities and centers, 55-64 

Special programs, 64 

Special registration and fees, 25 

Statistics, 189 

Statistics, Institute of, 55 

Student conduct. Code of, 3 

Student famUy housing, see Housing 

Summary of procedures. Master's degrees, 45; Doctoral degrees, 52 



Teaching Assistantships, Research and, 30 

Technical Communication, see English 

Technology Education, see Mathematics and Science Education 

Termination, academic, 22 

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), 14 

Textile and Apparel Management, 192 

Textile Chemistry, see Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science 

Textile Engineering, see Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science 

Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, 194 

Textile Management and Technology, see Textile and Apparel Management 

Textiles Materials Science, see Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science 

Textile Technology Management, 196 

Thesis deadlines, see Calendar 

Thesis, Master's degrees, 43; Doctoral degrees (dissertation), 52 

Thesis programs, Students in, summary. Master's degrees, 45 

Time limit. Master's degrees, 44; Doctoral degrees, 52 

Toxicology, 198 

Traineeships, Eligiblity for assistantships, fellowships or, 22 

Training and Development, see Adult and Community College Education 

Transfer credit, 41 

Transfer of undergraduate credit, 41; also see Seniors 

Transcript submission, 14 

Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 64 

Tropical Studies, Organization for, 62 

Trustees, Board of. North Carolina State University, 271 



283 



Tuition and Fees, 24-26; Semester rates, 24; Summer rates (per session), 25; Special regis- 
tration and fees, 25; Full-time faculty and employees, 26; Tuition remission, 
26; Refund policy; 26; Cooperative education program, 26; Residence status for 
tuition purposes, 27 

Tuition remission, 26 

U 

University Patent and Copyright Procedures, 65 

V 

Veterinary Medical Sciences, 200 

W 

Warning, academic, 22 

Water Resources, 219 

Water Resources Research Institute, 55 

WildUfe Biology, 203 

Wood and Paper Science, 204 

Work-study jobs, 35 

Written examinations. Master's degrees, 44; Doctoral degrees, 49 

Z 

Zoology, 206 



284 



NORTH CAROLINA STAT 





BUILDING NAME 

Owen Residence Haii 
'Page Haii 
Park Shops 



3RID CODE 



Patterson Hall 

Peeie Hail 

Physical Plant Mamt Center 

Physical Plant Shops (Armory) 

'Phylotron 

Poe Hall 

jPoik Hall 

Power Plant 

|Pnce Music Center 

(Prrmrose Hall 

[Print Shop/University Graphics 

buad Snack Bar 

Wm Neat Reynolds Coliseum 

picks Hall 

iRiddick Engineerir>g Labs 

n i dd i ck O t ad i u i n 

Robertson Wing, Biltmore Hall 
Schaub Food Science Building 
Scon Hall 
Steam Plant 
NCSU Bookstores 
Sullivan Residence Hall 
iSyme Residence Hall 
[Television Center 
Thompson Theater/Craft Center 
[Tompkins Hall 
p"ucker Residence Hall 
fTurhngton Residence Hall 
iTurner House 
University Student Center 
Watauga Haii 



Vveavuf Laljuiaturies — 

^eed Control Laboratories 

Welch Residence Halt 

Williams Hall 

Winston Hall 

Withers Hati 

North Residence Hall 

Caldwell Hall 

Weisiger-Brown Building (GAF) 

Wood Residence Hall 

A M Fountain Dining Hall 

Solar Demonstration House 

Administrative Services Center 

Research Facitity (on Centennial Can^pus) (Not Shown) 

PuHen Hall 

Jordan Halt 



^ 



BUILDING NAME 

Clark Hall 
Clark Laboraton 
Coi Hall 



GRID CODE 



ary 



W t^l Dun n Bu ilding 

Datoey Hall 
Dafiieis Hall 

McKimmon Extension Conlinuing 
Education Center 

Fartn Unit 5 

Field House 

Fr^ernity Court 

Gardner Han 

Botlian Hall 

Gold Residence Hall 

Williams Hall Addition 

Greenhouse— Biological Sciences 

Greenhouse — Horticulture 
Greenhouse— 840 Method Rd 
Greenhouse— Plant Pathology 



Hulp & Paper Labs 
iStudent Center Annex 

COURTS AND FIELDS 

Bagwell-Becton. Berry Quad 
Gold-Welch-Syrne-Brooks Court 
Mary E Yarbrough Court 
Court ol North Carolina 
Gardner Arboretum 
ilniversity Plaaa IBnckyardl 
University Student Center Plaza 
Turlington-Alexander Court 
tucker-Owen Court 

(.ee-Suiiivan-Bragaw Court 

fraternity Court 

^ S King Village Court 



AGH 
BSG 
HGH 



Gr^nells Animal Health Las 

Hacretson Hall 
HatrisHali 

D H Hill Library— Original Wing 
D H Hill Lib-ary- Book Slack Tower 5-C 
D H Hill Library— Erdahl-Cloyd Wing 5-C 
North Campus Bookshop 5-C 

Hilbborough Building 5-C 

Hodges Wood Products Lab 
Holiaday Hall 

Information Center Visitor Parking 3-B 

Kilfore Hall 6-0 

Laurtdry/Copy Center 3-C 

Le42ar Hall 

Le* Residence Hall 

M arn H a ll 



aulH Derr Track 
Miller Fields 
Doak Field 

McKimmon Center Court 
The Big Acre 
Tennis Courts 

PARKING LOTS 

Brooks Ave Lot 

nichaei Lot 

ieum Bays 

^ast Coliseum Lot 

riendly Drive Lot 

Hams Lot 

Hillsborough Buiidir^g Lots 

Por hi n g Poc k 



3RI0 

6-C 
3-D 
3-0 
2-C 
S-D 



E $ King Village 1 17 Apt Bidgs A-Ol 

Mefnorial Tower 3-A 

MelcaK Residence Haii *-D 

Mc»ris Building 3-C 

Nelson Hall 6-0 

191 1 Building 4-C 



<iddick Lot 

livan Lots 

Vest Lot 

[Additional West Lot Pai 
jvarbrough Lot 
liilsborough Square North 



ng 



Accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

NCSU is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools to award the associate, baccalaureate, master's and doctoral degrees. 



ft?^-T,v---.»«CT<w^rT»;'agy.^7 j, 



North Carolina State University Bulletin 

The Graduate School 

Box 7102 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7102 



25.000 copies of this public document were printed at a cost of $47,500.00, or $1.90 per copy. 



1996 Spring 
Commencement 

North Carolina State University 




Saturday, May 11 

Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-Six 

Degrees Awarded 1996 



DEGREES TO BE CONFERRED 



Saturday, May 11 
Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-Six 



This program is prepared for informational purposes only. The appearance of an individual's 
name does not constitute the University's acknowledgement, certification, or representation that the 
individual has fiilfilled the requirements for a degree. 

Honors listed for May 1996 candidates for degree are tentative in that they are calculated without 
the fmal semester grades. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Musical Program iv 

Exercises of Graduation v 

The Alma Mater vi 

Fred McFeely Rogers vii 

Time and Location of Distribution of Diplomas viii 

ROTC Commissioning Ceremony x 

Commencement Ushers xi 

Commencement Marshals xi 

Faculty Retirements 1995-96 xii 

Academic Costume xiii 

Academic Honors xiii 

Undergraduate Degrees 1 

Graduate Degrees 51 

Master's Degrees 51 

Master of Arts Degrees 57 

Master of Science Degrees 58 

Doctor of Education Degrees 65 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 66 

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Degrees 77 

Board of Governors' Award for Excellence in Teaching 79 

Alumni Faculty Awards 80 

Outstanding Teacher Awards for 1995-96 81 

Awards for Achievement - 1995-96 82 

Phi Beta Kappa 93 

Phi Kappa Phi 95 

Army, Navy and Air Force ROTC Commissionees - 1995-96 96 

1996 Commencement Acknowledgements 98 



HI 



MUSICAL PROGRAM 

EXERCISES OF GRADUATION 
May 11, 1996 

Commencement Band Concert 8:30 am 
Carter-Finley Stadium 

The Thunderer , John Philip Sousa 

Chorale and Shaker Dance John Zdechlik 

Chorale for Band Frank Erickson 

Overture Jubiloso Frank Erickson 

Suite George Frederick Handel, arr. by Osterling; Gordon 

March 

Aria 

Sarabande 

Bourree 

Air 

Finale 

Processional: 9:00 a.m. 

March Processional Clare Grundman 

Recessional: 

University Grand March Edwin Franko Goldman 



N.C. STATE UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT BAND 
Dr. Robert B. Fetters, Conductor 



IV 



EXERCISES OF GRADUATION 



Carter-Finley Stadium 

Chancellor Larry K. Monteith 

Presiding 

May 11, 1996 



PROCESSIONAL, 9:00 a.m Dr. Robert Patters 

Conductor, North Carolina State University Commencement Band. 
The audience is requested to remain seated during the Processional. 

WELCOME Chancellor Larry K. Monteith 

INVOCATION The Reverend Glenda Johnson 

St. Andrew's United Methodist Church, Gamer, NC 

NATIONAL ANTHEM The Grains of Time 

INTRODUCTIONS Chancellor Monteith 

ADDRESS Mr. Fred McFeely Rogers 

Host, Mister Rogers ' Neighborhood on PBS 

CONFERRING OF HONORARY DEGREES Chancellor Monteith 

Fred McFeely Rogers Doctor of Humane Letters 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES Chancellor Monteith 

Candidates for Doctor of Veterinary Medicine presented by Dean of College 
of Veterinary Medicine. Candidates for other advanced degrees presented by 
Dean of Graduate School. Candidates for baccalaureate degrees presented by 
Deans of Colleges. 

ADDRESS TO FELLOW GRADUATES Mr. Andrew Michael Crocker 

Class of 1996 

RECOGNITIONS Chancellor Monteith 

VALEDICTORIANS CLASS OF 1996 

Bernard Philip Bowling David Brian Hill 

Eric Noboru Burcsu Stephanie Anja Manfredi 

Mary Patricia Campbell Henry Cooper McDade 

Chris Louis Capps John Caviness O'Quinn 

Holly Ann Chandler Nathan Phillip Sutton 

Deborah Eva Citrin Melanie Lynn Tew 

Joseph Anthony Delgross Teresa Ellen Valliere 
William Arthur George 

TURNING OF THE TASSEL Ms. Stacey Lynne Bolen 

President, Senior Class 

ALMA MATER The Grains of Time 

RECESSIONAL (Platform Party only) 

The audience is requested to be seated during the Recessional. 



THE ALMA MATER 



Words by: f^usic by: 

ALVIN M. FOUNTAIN, '23 BONNIE F. NORRIS, JR., '23 



Where the winds of Dixie softly blow 
o'er the fields of Caroline, 



There stands ever cherished N.C. State, 
as thy honored shrine. 



So lift your voices; Loudly sing 
from hill to oceanside! 



Our hearts ever hold you, N.C. State 
in the folds of our love and pride. 



VI 



FRED MCFEELY "MISTER" ROGERS 




Fred McFeely Rogers is the longtime host of the Mister Rogers ' Neighborhood 
television program, a child development expert, an ordained Presbyterian minister and a 
family advocate. Rogers was bom in 1928 in Latrobe, Pa., a small town east of Pittsburgh, 
where he also was raised. 

He attended Rollins College in Florida, where he majored in music composition. 
After graduation in 1951, he was hired by NBC in New York as an assistant producer. He 
later worked as floor director on several programs. 

In 1953 he moved back to Pittsburgh at the request of WQED, the nation's first 
community-supported public television station. Rogers developed and began producing 
several programs there, including The Children's Corner. Some of Rogers' program 
regulars, including puppets Daniel Striped Tiger and King Friday XIII, began their long 
lives on the show. 

It was during the seven-year run of The Children's Corner that Rogers began 
studying child development and attending the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary in his spare 
time. He was ordained by the Pittsburgh Presbytery in 1962 with a charge to continue his 
work with children and families through the media. 

Rogers first appeared on camera in 1963, when he was hired by the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation to create a 15-minute children's series entitled MISTEROGERS. 

In 1964 Rogers returned to Pittsburgh, where his show evolved into the half-hour 
Mister Rogers ' Neighborhood. Rogers uses his own observations and training along with 
consultations with experts to write Mr. Rogers ' Neighborhood, the longest running show on 
public television. 

The program reaches almost eight million households and child-care settings each 
week. There are nearly 700 episodes in the series, and Rogers continues to write and 
produce several weeks of new programs each season. 

Mister Rogers ' Neighborhood is a slow-moving, quiet program aimed at teaching 
children to find within themselves the courage to grow. 

Rogers' work has earned two George Foster Peabody Awards and several Emmys. 

Rogers is president of Family Communications Inc., the nonprofit organization he 
founded in 1971 to produce materials that encourage the healthy emotional growth of 
children and their families. 

He has received honorary degrees fi-om more than 30 colleges and universities, 
including Yale, Carnegie Mellon and Boston universities and his alma mater, Rollins 
College. 

Rogers and his wife, Joanne Byrd Rogers, have two married sons and two 
grandsons. 



vu 



TIME AND LOCATION FOR 
DISTRIBUTION OF DIPLOMAS 



College of Agriculture and Life Sciences - 1:30 p.m. 

Agricultural Business Management and Agricultural Economics 1404 Williams Hall 

Agricultural and Extension Education NCSU Faculty Club 

Agronomy, Conservation, Crop Science, and Soil Science 2215 Williams Hall 

Animal Science Room 2, McKimmon Center, Western Boulevard 

Biochemistry Room 6, McKimmon Center, Western Boulevard 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 158 D. S. Weaver Laboratories 

Biological Sciences 3712 Bostian Hall 

Botany, Ecology, Entomology, Genetics, Microbiology, 

Nutrition, Plant Pathology and Toxicology 2722 Bostian Hall 

Environmental Sciences Location of Major Faculty Advisor 

Food Science 105 Schaub Hall 

Horticultural Science NCSU Arboretum, Beryl Road 

(In case of rain, 159 Kilgore Hall) 

Natural Resources Location of Major Faculty Advisor 

Physiology Program Location of Major Faculty Advisor 

Poultry Science 106 Scott Hall 

Applied Sociology 218 Withers Hall 

Zoology, Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Medical Technology . . Forest Hills Baptist Church, 

3110 Clark Avenue 

School of Design - 1:30 p.m Stewart Theatre, University Student Center 

Reception - 2:30 p.m Brooks Hall Courtyard 

College of Education and Psychology - 1:30 p.m. except for those marked with an asterisk. 
Adult and Community College Education, 
Administration and Supervision, 
Education General Studies and 

Health Occupations Education (Graduate Students) . . Rooms 3 and 4, McKimmon Center, 

Western Boulevard 
Counselor Education 216 Poe Hall 

* Curriculum and Instruction, Special Education, 

Health Occupations Education (Undergraduate Students), 

Marketing Education and Middle Grades Education - 2:00 p.m Carmichael Gym 

Mathematics, Science, Occupational 

and Technology Education Daniels Middle School Auditorium, 2816 Oberlin Road 

* Psychology - 1 :00 p.m Carmichael Gym 



Vlll 



College of Engineering - 1 :30 p.m. except for those marked with an asterisk 

Aerospace Engineering Ballroom, University Student Center 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 158 D. S. Weaver Laboratories 

Chemical Engineering Cinema, Witherspoon Student Center 

Civil Engineering 240 Nelson Hall 

Computer Science Fairmont United Methodist Church, 2501 Clark Avenue 

Electrical and Computer Engineering Edenton Street United Methodist Church, 

228 West Edenton Street 

Industrial Engineering Brooks Avenue Church of Christ, 700 Brooks Avenue 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Walnut Room, University Student Center 

Master of Engineering Walnut Room, University Student Center 

Materials Science and Engineering McKimmon Center, Western Boulevard 

* Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate) 2:30 p.m Ballroom, University Student Center 

Mechanical Engineering (Graduate) Ballroom, University Student Center 

Nuclear Engineering North Portico, Burlington Engineering Laboratories 

College of Forest Resources - 1 :30 p.m McKimmon Center, Western Boulevard 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences • 1:30 p.m except for those marked with an asterisk 

Communication Raleigh Civic Center 

English Court of the Carolinas (In case of rain, Carmichael Gym) 

Foreign Languages and Literatures Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall, 

2723 Clark Avenue 
History Brickyard at Harrelson Hall (In case of rain, 107 Harrelson Hall) 

* Multidisciplinary Studies - 3:00 p.m Room 126, Witherspoon Student Center 

Philosophy and Religion Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall, 

2723 Clark Avenue 

Political Science and Public Administration Highland United Methodist Church, 

1901 Ridge Road 

Social Work G107 Caldwell Hall 

Sociology and Anthropology 218 Withers Hall 

College of Management - 1:30 p.m. 

Accounting Main Floor, Reynolds Coliseum 

Business Management Main Floor, Reynolds Coliseum 

Economics Main Floor, Reynolds Coliseum 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences - 1:30 p.m. 

Chemistry 222 Dabney Hall 

Mathematics 124 Dabney Hall 

Physics 206 Cox Hall 

Statistics Ephesus Baptist Church, 6767 Hillsborough St 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 242 Riddick Hall 

College of Textiles - 1 :30 p.m Courtyard, Centennial Textile Complex 

College of Veterinary Medicine - DVM Graduates 

Reception - 1 :30 p.m Blue & Green Commons 



IX 



ROTC COMMISSIONING 
CEREMONY 



COLONEL ROBERT H. PENNY, USAF 
Presiding 

Stewart Theatre 

University Student Center 

May n, 1996 

PROCESSIONAL MARCH, 5:00 p.m Dr. Robert Petters 

Conductor, North Carolina State University Commencement Band 

POSTING OF THE COLORS Multi-Service Color Guard 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

INVOCATION Paster G. Riley Powell 

WELCOME Dr. Larry K. Monteith 

Chancellor 

INTRODUCTIONS Colonel Robert H. Penny 

Professor of Aerospace Studies 

ADDRESS The Honorable Sheila E. Widnall 

Secretary of the Air Force 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE OATH 

OF OFFICE Lieutenant Colonel John H. Mclnemey 

Professor of Military Science 

Captain Richard J. Field 

Professor of Naval Science 

Colonel Robert H. Penny 

Professor of Aerospace Studies 

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES Secretary Widnall 

Dr. Larry K. Monteith 

BENEDICTION Pastor G. Riley Powell 

RETIRING OF THE COLORS Multi-Service Color Guard 

RECESSIONAL North Carolina State University Commencement Band 

The audience is requested to remain seated until the Recessional music is completed. 



COMMENCEMENT USHERS 



Air Force ROTC Ushers 



Navy ROTC Ushers 



Army ROTC Ushers 



Jonathon Albaugh 
Brian Bandy 
Rafael Carroll 
James Chambers 
April Ducote 
Jennifer Hehl 
Eric Lindquist 
Tammy Lx)w 
Christine Sakaniwa 
Jason Smith 
Michael Stanifer 
Bruce Tellman 
Andrew White 



Derek Brady 
Kevin Crow 
Anthony Duttera 
Lemuel Fagan 
Edward Floyd 
Kelly Grissom 
John Grebeta 
Johnnie Jones 
Eric Kelly 
David Moore 
David Ramthun 
Douglas Shamlin 



Matthew Bagley 
Christopher Culpepper 
Michael Ferralli 
Brian Henderson 
Steven Howard 
Theodore Kingsberry 
Sidney Linker 
Michael McCarson 
Jason Nicholson 
Mark Pickett 
Mark Sheets 
John Taylor 
Anthony Thacher 
Brian Winter 



COMMENCEMENT MARSHALS 



J. Natasha Barnes 
Samuel T. Barron 
P. Brent Beamon 
Salam G. Bidwan 
Natasha G. Bolick 
Deirdre D. Catlett 
Sharon A. Chung 
Scott A. Clay 
R. Bryant Crisp 
Andrea M. Dailey 
Felton S. Dengler 
Marshal K. Eagle 
Daniel K. Edge 
Kyler A. England 
H. Joy El Faysal 
Alexia K. Fody 
David W. Frink 
Carol A. Fuller 
S. Michelle Garoutte 



Levent E. Gokcen 
Alex David Groce 
J. Zachariah Hall II 
Rebecca E. Hawkins 
David R. Higgins 
Courtney L. High 
Melani Hix 
H. Jeanette Hughes 
Nathan S. Johnson 
Matteson Kinney 
Eiji Kunisawa 
liana Kurts 

Alexander B. LeGrand 
Stephanie C. Lovell 
Laurie A. Lyon 
Sybil L. MacDonald 
Kelly A. McAvoy 
William J. Mitchell 
Allison C. Modafferi 



Rebecca D. Mon^omery 
R. Chad Myers 
Mark A. Nippert 
Megan E. Osborne 
Emily N. O'Quinn 
Loretta Pesteanu-Somogyi 
M. Claire Pittman 
Kyle J. Rehder 
L. Taylor Roberts 
Jonathan C. Routh 
Karen R. Shigehara 
Aimee D. Smart 
Brent S. Sumerlin 
Holly N. Thomas 
Jacob G Vanden Bosch 
Chaffee W. Viets 
Betsy L. Watson 
Tracey M. Westbrook 
Paul H. Zigas 



XI 



FACULTY RETIREMENTS, 1995-96 

Axtell, Richard C, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, will retire June 30, 

1996. 
Averre, Charles W., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired January 1, 

1996. 
Beezer, Bruce G., College of Education and Psychology, will retire June 30, 1996. 
Cooke, Armand V., School of Design, will retire May 15, 1996 
Edwards, John A., College of Engineering, will retire May 15, 1996. 
Feam, Robert M., College of Management, will retire June 30, 1996. 
Fike, William T., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired November 1, 

1995. 
Hardin, James W., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, will retire June 30, 

1996. 
Harrington, Ben D., College' of Veterinary Medicine, retired March 31, 1996. 
Holler, William M., College of Humanities and Social Sciences, will retire May 15, 

1996. 
Hoover, Dale M., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired October 1, 1995. 
Horton, H. Robert, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired August 31, 

1995. 
Houser, Gloria W., NCSU Libraries, will retire June 30, 1996. 
Kellison, Robert C, College of Forest Resources, retired January 1, 1996. 
Levi, Patricia E., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, will retire May 31, 1996. 
Levings, Charles S., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, will retire June 30, 

1996. 
Martin, Charles, Division of Student Affairs, retired September 30, 1995. 
Milholland, Robert D., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, will retire May 31, 

1996. 
Moreland, Donald E., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired November 

3, 1995. 
Moseley, Robert, Staff Physician, Division of Student Affairs, retired July 31, 1995. 
Parramore, Barbara M., College of Education and Psychology, will retire on May 

15, 1996. 
Rakes, Allen H., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired October 1, 1995. 
Schwartz, Steven J., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired January 1, 

1996. 
Smith, Donald E., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired January 1, 1996. 
Stevens, Charles E., College of Veterinary Medicine, retired December 31, 1995. 
Sullivan, Gene A., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, retired November 1, 

1995. 
Sylvester, John, NC Japan Center, retired December 31, 1995. 
Weedon, J. Frank, Division of Athletics, retired March 31, 1996. 
Zia, Paul Z., College of Engineering, retired January 1, 1996. 



xu 



ACADEMIC COSTUME 



Academic gowns represent a tradition handed down from the universities of the Middle Ages. 
These institutions were founded by the Church; the students, being clerics, were obliged to wear the 
prescribed gowns at all times. Round caps later became square mortarboards; the hoods, originally 
cowls attached to the gowns, could be slipped over the head for warmth. 

Many European universities have distinctive caps and gowns which are different from those 
commonly used in this country. Some of the gowns are of bright colors and some are embellished 
with fiir. A number of these may be noted in the procession. 

The usual color for academic gowns in the United States is black. The bachelor's gown is worn 
closed, the master's and doctor's may be worn open or closed. The shape of the sleeve is the 
distinguishing mark of the gown: bachelor— long pointed sleeves; master—oblong, square cut in the 
back with an arc cut away in front; doctor— bell shaped. 

Caps are black. The tassels for the Ph.D. degree are gold and those for other graduate and 
professional degrees may be of the color corresponding to the trimmings on the hoods. 

Of all the components of the academic costume, the hood bears the heaviest symbolic burden. 
The hood must make clear the level of the degree, the faculty in which it was given, and the 
institution which awarded it. The level of the degree is shown by the size of the hood, the width of 
the velvet trimming, and in the case of doctors, by the shape. The bachelor's, master's, and doctor's 
hoods are three feet, three and one-half feet, and four feet long, respectively. The velvet trimming 
in the same order is two, three, and five inches and extends all around the hood on the exposed edge. 
This same trimming identifies the faculty in which the degree was awarded For each faculty there 
is a corresponding color; so a glance at the trimming is all that is needed to identify the faculty. A 
partial list of the colors follows: Agriculture, maize; Architecture and Art, brown; Science, golden 
yellow; Economics, copper; Education, light blue; Engineering, orange; Forestry, russet; Physical 
Education, sage green; Religion, scarlet; Speech, silver gray; Veterinary Medicine, gray; Textiles, 
wine red. TTie following faculties have the same color— dark blue: Anthropology, History, 
Languages, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology. 



ACADEMIC HONORS 



Honors participants benefit from a more individualized and rigorous approach to their desired 
degree through special classes, seminars and individual research. 

Undergraduate degree honor designations are: 

Cum Laude-for GPA 3.250 through 3.499 (white sash) 
Magna Cum Laude-for GPA 3.500 through 3.749 (red sash) 
Summa Cum Laude-for GPA 3.750 and above (gold sash) 



Xlll 




UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

Degrees To Be Conferred May 11, 1996 



College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

♦*♦ Robert Bourke Christian Chapel Hill 

Bryan Paul Clark Newton 

Scott James Frederick Raleigh 

Benjamin Scott Gresham King And Queen C.H., VA 

Herbert Louis Hales II Kenly 

+ Jenifer Lynn Jordan Pittsboro 

Gary Charles Miller Cary 

* Benjamin Scott Mitchell Gates 

*** Christopher Thomas Mosley Tarboro 

Robyn Jeanette Mullen Raleigh 

Christopher Vance Norville Ellenboro 

** Jeffrey Michael Parker Albemarle 

Jan Marie Patterson Jackson Springs 

Brian Matthew Simpson Marshville 

David McKinley Stein, Jr Fayetteville 

Scott Avery Vinson Maury 

Jason Herman Wilson Henderson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

Michael Thomas Prange Salisbury 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Amy Nicole Barefoot Newton Grove 

Frederick Brandon Beach Hamilton 

Dede Renee Bivins Durham 



+Co-iiia)or H Honon Program S Univereiiy Scholars Program 

*CiuiiLaide ♦•MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laudc 



Michael Todd Blake Raleigh 

SH+*** Rosemary Dawn Bowen Walnut Cove 

Douglas Scott Goodwin Vale 

Kelli Lynn Haines Belvidere 

Claudia Lee Hamiil Enfield 

*♦ James William Kiser Vale 

Michael Ryan Ledford Raleigh 

Chad Nelson Matheson Raleigh 

Angle Elaine Peters Knightdale 

+ Steven Wayne Pridgen Whitakers 

Amy Lynn Winstead Roxboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ES AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Karen Rae Bowlin Newport 

Carol Lynn Hassell Elizabeth City 

* Travis Wayne Hodge Rutherfordton 

* Albert Dixon Jones Chinquapin 

Kevin Israel Jones Elk Park 

Douglas Michael Latta Hillsborough 

*♦♦ Lori Lynn Lucas Mt Holly 

Joseph Bert Noble Kinston 

** David Mitchel Overcash Kannapolis 

+* Shane Roberts Parker Hillsborough 

** Brian Glenn Parrish Gamer 

♦** Jennifer Lynn Roney Mebane 

Michael Randolph Thomas Rockingham 

Jason Keith Wynne Bear Grass 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 

Jody Anison McPherson Chadboum 

Bryan Christopher Spell Clinton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRONOMY 

Christopher Lee BufFaloe Wendell 

Christopher Paul Butcher Raleigh 

Lloyd Shannon Orr Chase City, VA 

Christian Austin Overton Shiloh 

+* Shane Roberts Parker Hillsborough 

* Robert Brian Roy Kemersville 

** David James Tucker Laurel Springs 

SH* Charles Odell Tulloch III Ayden 

Jason Todd Wooten Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

H* Kimberly Dawn Ange Belhaven 

Walter Henry Barrier Mt Pleasant 

Michele Denise Basso Springfield, VT 

SH+*** Rosemary Dawn Bowen Walnut Cove 

+Co-iiiaior H Honors Program S Univasity Sdiolars Program 

•CumLaudc ••MagnaCum Laude •••SummaCum Laude 

2 



H* Felicia Dawn Brim Greensboro 

H** Karen Elizabeth Bums Chapel Hill 

SH*** Holly Ann Chandler Chapin, SC 

*** Jeffrey Thomas Cole Orlando, FL 

Thomas Allen Cook Bakersville 

David Franklin Correll Cleveland 

Anthony Wayne Crocker . Pine Level 

H* Adrienne Elizabeth Crosier Camden, DE 

*♦* Katherine Virginia Cutter Asheville 

Sarah Ellen Davis Troutville, VA 

Colleen Ann Eddy Cary 

Andrea Nicole Emanuel Kinston 

H** Jonathan Leonard Featherstone Gold Hill 

Pattie Wilkins Ferrell Wake Forest 

Robert Christian Ford Wake Forest 

David Matthew Greene Fairfax, VA 

Kimberly Ann Gruwell Salisbury, MD 

* Nicole Lanae Hale Durham 

Joel Steven Harrison, Jr Snow Hill 

Meredith Battley Jarman Gastonia 

** Terri Ann King Asheville 

Elizabeth Sara Lanning Raleigh 

*** Zane Ian Lapinskes Gamer 

SH* Barbara Anne Lawing Raleigh 

Stacy Kim Lettsome Tortola, Virgin Islands 

* Michael Earl Littell Mebane 

Tanya Lynn Meads Elizabeth City 

* Rebecca Lynn Meyer Charlotte 

Tyler David Mitchell Taylorsville 

Sondra Michele Moritz Raleigh 

Amy Renee Nethery Woodleaf 

Jennifer Elizabeth Norton East Islip, NY 

Angle Lynn Parker Nashville 

Jonathan Alan Pope Coats 

+ Steven Wayne Pridgen Whitakers 

Kenneth WoodmfF Redmond Seneca, SC 

James Scott Sain George Hildebran 

Jessica May Schell Gamer 

* Mary Grace Scott Elizabeth City 

Eric William Sellers Gastonia 

Jarrett Shane Smith Norwood 

*** Russell Lee Sprinkles Belmont 

H* Chad Harmon Stahl Cherry Hill, NJ 

Matthew Blake Tumer Kinston 

Archie Reid Tyson III Zebulon 

Michelle Ann Walker Raleigh 

Michael Christian Ward Cape May Court House, NJ 

Rebecca Gail Weaver Hudson 

Carri Amber Williams Denton 

Leigh Ann Williams Dallas 



+Co-nnjor H Honon Program S Univosity Scholars Program 

'CumLaidc ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laudc 

3 



*** 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY 

Mary Forrest Barker Statesville 

Larry Donnell Boyd Monroe 

Chris Alan Dickerson Raleigh 

Lisa Kay Harris ■ • Roanoke Rapids 

Michael Wayne Howell Dudley 

Sean Kent Lloyd Wendell 

Marjorie MacDonald Morris Pittsburgh, PA 

Karen Michelle Odom Fayetteville 

Kristin Elizabeth Smith Pinehurst 

♦♦ Patti Jo West Morganton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

Tracia Mignon Bailey Charlotte 

* Neil Rodney Bowman King 

S+** Erin Christine Caine Raleigh 

* Byron Keith Carter Apex 

+*♦ Trisha Myers Castranio Raleigh 

+ Paul Lawrence Cianchetta North Wilksboro 

+*♦ Alison Jane Cobb Asheville 

Delena Kay Coor Goldsboro 

+ Christopher Ray Delozier Charlotte 

*♦* John Paul Denny Asheville 

+ Michael Grant Dodds Oxford 

+* Matthew Walter Faino Winston-Salem 

+♦*♦ Jayne Keifer Goodman Chicago, IL 

Todd Mitchel Goodwin Charlotte 

S+*** Robin Lynne Grice Raleigh 

SH*** Kerry Lynn Hammond Burlington 

♦*♦ Jenny Rebecca Helton Monroe 

+* Charles David Hunter Winston-Salem 

* Daniel Matthew Johnson North Wilkesboro 

+*♦ Shannon Elizabeth Jones High Point 

Gary John Matsey Goldsboro 

* Colette Cynthia Matthews Covington, TN 

Jonathan Brett Morgan Wilmington 

Jennifer Susanne Olgiate Raleigh 

** Steven Edward Parsons Raleigh 

Nicholas Edward Promin Concord 

* Carla Jean Randall Morganton 

Katherine Mary Rouse Vienna, VA 

Cassandra Denise Southern Rowland 

Catherine Nichole Sprouse Raleigh 

*** Melanie Lynn Tew Stedman 

SH+*** Christina Lea Thomas Rockingham 

*♦ Timothy Khanh Tran Greensboro 

♦♦* Susan Tsui Chapel Hill 

+ Karen Elizabeth Twiford Rocky Mount 

S** Malathi Viswanathan Wilmington 

* David Christian Vondle Danbury, CT 

+Co-inajor H Honors Program S Univcf3it>' Scholars Program 

•CumLaudc ♦•MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laude 



+ Gary Scott Weaver Fayetteville 

+*♦ Michelle DeeLeigh Wilkerson Jacksonville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Ramona Sheanette Adams Charlotte 

H* Rachel Lee Akins Charlotte 

Teresa Gail Allison Burlington 

Carol Ann Barclay Geneva, IL 

Stephen Eugene Barreau Charlotte 

Andrew Jeffrey Bashor Chamberburg, PA 

Carol Anne Beam Ellenboro 

Juli Marie Blitchington Greensboro 

Timothy Michael Broderick Cary 

Michael Lee Brooks Winston-Salem 

*♦ Jason Matthew Chester Winston-Salem 

Charlotte Amalie Chiswell Cary 

SH*** Deborah Eva Citrin Thomasville 

Michelle Leanne Coble Raleigh 

* Jamie Scott Crowder Maiden 

S+* Regina Heather Crowell Albermarle 

+♦*♦ Robert Kevin Harrell Henderson 

Adam Scott Hedspeth Raleigh 

Kristen Renee Holder Browns Summit 

* Rachel Lee Hunt Summerfield 

S Ellen Elizabeth Jurischk Wilmington 

Michael Brian King, Jr Kinston 

Kristen Kohlmeir King Of Prussia, PA 

+ KoUeen Kay Kreul Coral Springs, FL 

Marilyn Kristen Liner Efland 

SH** Lori Rae Linger Wilmington 

SH*** Adam Edward Majewski Winston-Salem 

Brian Lewis McCluney Winston-Salem 

Cassie McEachem Gamer 

* Elizabeth Ann Melbourne Cary 

S** Sean Christopher Moore Cary 

Jennifer Lynn Morrison Greensboro 

+ Emily Lesesne Nelson Columbia, SC 

Shirley Eve Owino Raleigh 

SH Elizabedi Diane Phillips Concord 

SH*** Michelle Denise Prysby Greensboro 

Aaron Oakley Robbins East Bend 

Gretchen Anne Rohrbach Raleigh 

* Jennifer Dawn Shugars Charlotte Hall, MD 

Stacey Nichole Sweigard Charlotte 

Keisha Levem Taylor Wilmington 

H+*** Christina Lea Thomas Rockingham 

* Rebecca Marie Thompson Marion 

Rolen Todd Thornton Raleigh 

** Dana Michelle Timar Cary 

Kenneth Scott Williams Edenton 



+Co-major H Honon Program S Univcrat) Sdiolan Program 

'CumLaude "MagnaCum Laude •••SummaCum Laude 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BOTANY 

S*** Laura Jeanne Grignon Charlotte 

Mary Kellar Lambert Charleston, SC 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

Stacie Leigh Edwards Gastonia 

Brett Sinclair Martin Colonial Heights, VA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES 

** Daron Keith Barnes Franklinton 

* Harrison Pendleton Bresee Raleigh 

+ Douglas Carter Burleson Lumberton 

Ashley Dale Cannon Roanoke Rapids 

♦♦ Robin Thomas Cheshire Greensboro 

* Kevin Scott Diilistin Apex 

*** Major Walter Lane New Bern 

Jason Douglas Letchworth Wilson 

Beven Harold Love Warrenton, VA 

Christopher Donald Manley Clinton 

Michael Aaron McKendree Burlington 

Naseem Ostovar Asheville 

+ Scott Hamilton Phillips Halifax 

+** Vann Franklin Stancil Kenly 

Edward Oscar Stevenson Henderson 

Katherine Bourg Tompkins Grosse Pointe, MI 

* Brent Deleon Triplett Wilkesboro 

S*** Julie Marie Williams Youngsville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FOOD SCIENCE 

Kimberly Hansen Baker Gamer 

Wayne Derick Cunningham Brooklyn, NY 

Natasha Jeaneen Ford Concord 

Michael William Gould Raleigh 

Janet Smith Hayes Durham 

Priya Vikram Kamdar Bombay, India 

Traci Lane Mantiply Raleigh 

Michael Lawrence McMurtry Raleigh 

♦♦ Christopher Warren Pemeli Cary 

Anna Kirsten Reich Winston-Salem 

Dana Lee Schroeder Gastonia 

Kara Cannatella Stivers Raleigh 

* Meredith Regan Summerlin Birmingham, AL 

Sherrie Lynne Thomas Franklinton 

Amanda Claire Ulicny Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

** Leslie Brooks Booker Manteo 

+Co-major H Honors Program S Univmity Scholars Program 

•Cum Laudc ••MagnaCum Laude •••SummaCum Laude 



Curtis Robert Cahoon Columbia 

♦♦ Beverly Anne Carroll Concord 

**♦ Leah Suzanne Cook Durham 

Eugene Earl Foushee Siler City 

John William Freeman Winston-Salem 

John Terrell Harris Weddington 

*♦ Marvin Lewis Lassiter III Roanoke Rapids 

* David Joseph Lisowski Richmond, VA 

* Michelle Hope McCullough Raleigh 

Carl Phillip Meyers, Jr Morganton 

Jeanette Carol Michaelson Raleigh 

Jessica Nicole Millsaps Terrel 

Jeffrey Carlyle Parrish, Jr Charlotte 

Scott Andrew Shapiro Raleigh 

John Mark Swicegood Apex 

Christina Leigh Turner Winston-Salem 

Matthew Charles Warlick Winston Salem 

* Natasha Elice Warren New Albany, IN 

Neill Donnell Westerbeek Clinton 

Todd Vincent Westra Youngsville 

Robin Conley Yaun Greensboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Cheryl Lynn Bowman Taylorsville 

Jennifer Sanders Carlton Shelby 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MICROBIOLOGY 

Omead Ahdieh Raleigh 

Chadwick Alan Church Raleigh 

SH** Carol Sue Dombroski Ronkonkoma, NY 

+♦** Robert Kevin Harrell Henderson 

*** Gregory William Knapp Cary 

LaTasha Renea Mayberry Tulsa, OK 

Thomas Harrison Midgette Creedmoor 

Mary Ann Pate Kinston 

Albert Michael Perez Sanford 

Shelly Lynn Sawyer Camden 

Robin Nicole Shepard Silver Spring, MD 

*♦ Erica Michelle Smith Norwood 

Tiffany Joy Tompkins Raleigh 

* Jennifer Ann Valashinas Hilsborough 

Jorge Manuel Vargas Lima, Peru 

Douglas Gregor Wright Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL RESOURCES 

Jennifer Kathleen Egolf Hendersonville 

Larry Dean Grantham, Jr Four Oaks 

S*** Rhonda Josera Hunt Clayton 



•KTo-niajor H HonoR Program S Unh asil) Scholars Program 

'CumLaude **MagiuCum Laudc ***SturaiiaCum Laudc 

7 



♦* Jimmy Lee Poindexter Sanford 

Todd Eugene Shearin Chesterfield, VA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

John Wayne Bane Moncure 

Rachel Elizabeth Doerfler Raleigh 

S*** Kimberly Rae Parks Morganton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ZOOLOGY 

** George Lieil Adams Gamer 

♦♦ Teresa Michelle Bacheler Apex 

♦♦* Jennifer Ross Balkcum Cary 

Danny Mack Barnes Benson 

SH*** Erin Michele Beebe Seymour, TN 

Mysty Leigh Blalock Albermarle 

Heather Marie Bowers Charlotte 

Shanda Javonne Bragg Suitland, MD 

*♦ Sherry Elizabeth Briggs Graham 

Jack Dale Brown Fayetteville 

Joseph MacAdam Brown Raleigh 

Tamara Lenora Brown Fayetteville 

Tracey Avery Brown Lakewood, CO 

Alexander Bunich Charlotte 

** Laura-Jean Coelho Buskirk Hartford, CT 

** Anna Christine Callaway Charlotte 

Jason Allen Campbell Greensboro 

Harrell Mitchell Carpenter, Jr Clinton 

Gretchen Brooke Caruana Mt. Pleasant, SC 

*** Sonya Marie Chauvin Dudley, MA 

Paul Lawrence Cianchetta North Wilksboro 

♦* Seth Ian Cohen Marietta, GA 

Tracy Kristen Combs Southington, OH 

** Alan Wilson Cooper Winston-Salem 

S+* Regina Heather Crowell Albermarle 

Shannon Leigh Daniels Winston-Salem 

Amy Denise Dillon Winston-Salem 

Allison Nicole Dorsey Raleigh 

Allen Joseph Dowdle Asheville 

* Deirdre Angelle Evans Roanoke Rapids 

+* Matthew Walter Faino Winston-Salem 

Monte Pierre Formy-Duval Whitevilie 

* Michelle Lynette Foster Winston Salem 

*** Carol Nicole Friddle Greensboro 

Kuan Jamel Gethers Bronx, NY 

S** Kimberly Caroline Glennon Wilmington 

Rebecca Anne Haskett McAdenville 

+* Allison Suzanne Hertzler High Point 

Jennifer Kay Holshouser Connelley Springs 

S* Alice Marie Hunsucker High Point 

+♦ Charles David Hunter Winston-Salem 



■fCo-major H Honon Program S Unh-asit)- Scholan Program 

*CuinLaude ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SuramaCum Laudc 

8 



*** 



* Jessica Suppa larocci Kingwood, TX 

♦ Terrence Shawn Ingram Wilmington 

Anthony Howard James Raleigh 

Gale Elizabeth Jancsics Raleigh 

^^"^ J«"" '.'.'.'.'.'.'..'. Charleston, SC 

Anil Francis Joy ^-^j^ 

Carla Anita Kelly '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..['. Salisbury 

Ellen Lurenda King Walnut Cove 

Virgmia Wellens King Durham 

+ Kolleen Kay Kreul Coral Springs, FL 

Mark Harold Landrum Raleigh 

Amy Alison Lawless '.'.'.'..'.'.'. Durham 

Nichole Ann Lehman Red Lion, PA 

Brian Robert Lyne Richmond, VA 

Melissa Megan Marks Charlotte 

Henry Cooper McDade ; ' ' " Hillsborough 

Tonya Shonelle McLeod Laurinburg 

Mary Cameron McNeill Hjgh poi^ 

Chadwick Thomas Merrell Arden 

** Andrew Stephen Metcalf Sumter SC 

** Elizabeth Ann Miller Raleigh 

Vikram Vasudev Mohip '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. Wilmington 

Shannon Logsdon Moore Fayetteville 

* Jonathan Randall Moss High Point 

H* Tanya Dee Mouchahoir Vienna, VA 

* Kara Lynn Mueller ' ; ; ; ^^.^ie 

Kristen Lynn Neuharth , Tolland CT 

William Thomas Oliver ...'.'".'.'. Burlington 

Denise Lynette Overcash Statesville 

■ <^^o""e Owens Columbia 

Kristie Lynn Oxford Spotsylvania, VA 

Joseph Rodney Pagan Sanford 

'^^'^"^ P'^ Bridgeton, NJ 

Christopher Carroll Potts Goldsboro 

Kmdel Craven Pritchard Myrtle Beach SC 

Meredith Erin Quinn Charlotte 

George Travis Rabb Wake Forest 

Amy Elizabeth Rhodes Charlotte 

Shenan Reid Riddick ' ' ' Fredericksburg. VA 

Lisa Kay Robertson Greensboro 

David Wesley Scheuermann Chapel Hill 

Ayn L. Schneider ' ; " ' ' Morehead City 

Benjamin Daniel Schramm Wilmington 

Celia Blake Shelton Raleigh 

Kevin Williams Shoulars Raleigh 

William Charles Skakun Raleigh 

Robin Christee Slocumb ...'..'..'. Fayetteville 

Brian Lee Slotter R^l^igj, 

Jacquelme Marie Smallwood Charlotte 

Angela Noelle Smith '.'.'.'.'..'. Salisbury, MD 

Yoko Orloff Sorensen Hickory 

Daniel Michael Stewart Raleigh 



♦ ** 



*** 



o-mi,or HHonoR Program S Univerat^ Sdiolars Program 

MagnaCum Uude •••SuramaCura Laude 



9 



Karen Lynn Stubbs Albemarle 

Jason Edward Thomason Raleigh 

Julie Ann VanOrsdel Albermarle 

Kristine Nichole Verstegen Raleigh 

Heather Lynn Weeks Hughesville, MD 

Takeila Eion Wilkins Raleigh 

Michael Leon Wright Lousiburg 



School of Design 



l-^r:r'-..i 



BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE 

* Ten Spain Canada Greensboro 

* Kevin Scott Deabler Concord 

Martha Ashley Doughton Sparta 

** Filiz Durmaz Raleigh 

** Kerry Gray Finley Graham 

** Jason Daniel Forney Greensboro 

Gordon Malcolm Grisinger III Charlotte 

** Julianne Carroll Harrelson Dublin 

** David Bronson Hincher Ronda 

*** Philippe Anton Jentsch Monthey, Switzerland 

** Todd Dean King Hendersonville 

** Nasim Forootan Kuenzel Fayetteville 

Rodrigo Eduardo Letonja Reston, VA 

Aric L Margolis Charleston, WV 

* Joseph Booth McCoy Concord 

* Bryan Michael Moffitt Greensboro 

David Virgil Sears, Jr Rochester, NY 

** John Scott Shell Hickory 

** Catherine Elliott Sherrill Mocksville 

*** John Douglas Tucker Springfield, VA 

♦* Catlin Emmett Tyler III Richmond, VA 

David Yung Wilmington 

BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

+*♦ Michael Jeffrey Norris Lenoir 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 

Thomas Franklin Gaines Raleigh 

Lori Tussey Lay Raleigh 

♦*♦ Benjamin Coble MacNeill Charlotte 

Jenifer Marie Padilla Chapel Hill 

Amanda Diane Pearman Goldsboro 



+Co-major H Honon Program S Univerati, Scholars Program 

•CumLaude "MagnaCumLaude •••SummaCum Laude 

10 



** Lindsay Cassandra Rogers Lewisville 

** William Dimitri Skolochenko Valdese 

*** Autumn Lee Stroupe Monroe 

Banks Colvert Talley III Raleigh 

♦♦ Matthew Watson Thomason Salisbury 

♦*♦ Abbie Fox Worrell Franklin, VA 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE 

* Robert Hazen Adams Essex Junction, VT 

Jonathan Corey Alexander Roxboro 

** Laura Miranda de Araujo Brasilia, Brazil 

Juan Manuel de Haro Raleigh 

Lynn Stone Eskridge Charlotte 

♦♦ Christine Rene Foster Charlotte 

*♦ Riyad Niel Ghannam Ardsley, NY 

Scott Daniel Gilvey Apex 

** Jamey Edward Glueck Nashville 

** Ian Sherrod Gordon Chapel Hill 

Stephen Lee Gwyn Pleasant Garden 

*** Kristen Marie Hart Valdese 

*** David Brian Hill Greensboro 

Ronald Derek Hopkins West Jefferson 

** Kyle Alan Huhtanen Cleveland, OH 

* Brian Lewis Jones Fuquay-Varina 

+***♦ James Frederick King III Hillsborough 

* Thomas Claude Langlois Raleigh 

* Bartley Wade Leatherman Vale 

Ryan Christopher Lockett Concord 

*** Michael Brandon Love Pilot Mountain 

* Evia Crump Moseley Indian Trail 

* Kimberly Latwanda Newell Roanoke Rapids 

* Scott Norman Phillips Doylestown, PA 

**♦ Lori Trosper Ricks Raleigh 

** Robert Jonathan Riddle Raleigh 

*** Jason Brent Sandy Roanoke, VA 

* Jeffrey Alan Schroeder Macungie, PA 

* Amy Renee Sims Mooresville 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN GRAPHIC DESIGN 

♦*♦ Brad David Bartlett West End 

♦♦ Cara Anne Carpenter Raleigh 

Cameron Lee Chilton Clemmons 

*♦ Julia Lee Eberle Cincinnati, OH 

** David Earle Favro Charlotte 

** Kimberly Danielle Foushee Raleigh 

Jonathan Michael Gerler Millviile, PA 

*♦♦ Dianne Virginia Hall Asheville 

*♦♦ Erin Street Hancock Burlington 

* Catherine Bryant Harrell Smithfield 

S* Sharon Elaine Horton Kings Mountain 

+Co-major H Honors Program S University Scholars Program 

*Cum Laude ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SununaCum Laudc 

11 



Wendy Yung-En Hu Gary 

Susan Arrington Johnston Washington 

♦♦ Teresa Lee Elizabeth City 

Daniela Maria Marx Goldsboro 

* Maryam Hendi Paydarfar Chapel Hill 

* Traci Jane Shelton Liberty 

♦** Mickey Lee Thomas Rosman 

Jerry Leroy Thornton, Jr Gastonia 

Allyson Bonner Thrift Winston-Salem 

* Raymond Daniel Tylak Lewisville 

Kendra DeSean Williams Waynesboro, VA 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN INDUSTRLVL DESIGN 

*♦* Justin Alan Chambers Chapel Hill 

Marlow Edmund Gates Asheville 

*♦ Michael Christopher Keating Raleigh 

+** James Frederick King III Hillsborough 

♦♦ Kelly Lea Massoud Durham 

*** Molly Hodgson McGaughey Raleigh 

*♦♦ Kathryn Andrea Gates Wheaton, IL 

*♦♦ Paul Lawrence Santangelo Port Republic, MD 

* Jonathan Tad Templeton Greensboro 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

* Jimmy Wakely Ashley, Jr Ronda 

**♦ Katherine Frances Dow Raleigh 

* Steven John Megesi Novi, MI 

* Jacqueline Chappell Miller Fredericksburg, VA 

+** Michael Jeffrey Norris Lenoir 



College of Education 
and Psychology 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

S*** Bernard Philip Bowling Durham 

Carla Suzanne Britt Newton Grove 

Teresa Anne Broomfield Greensboro 

H** Nakia Chandra Brown Chinquapin 

Lisa Renae Buchanan Maple Hill 

H** Michael Ryan Chipley Faith 

*** Timothy Harper Colvin Raleigh 

Stephanie Denise Cueman Charlotte 



+Co-inajor H Honors Program S Univo^ity Scholars Program 

*CuinLaude **MagnaCumLaude ***SummaCum Laude 

12 




* Stacey Jude Cunningham Raleigh 

♦♦ Wendy Karel Curtis Williamsburg, VA 

* Jason Grant Daurity Raleigh 

Susan Marie Denton Wake Forest 

* David Adam Dietrich Martinsville, VA 

** Susan Randolph Edmondson Rocky Mount 

* John Henry Forte Eureka 

Meredith Ann Fosina Gladstone, NJ 

+*** William Arthur George Nags Head 

* Amy Melissa Gill Morehead City 

* Teresa Guglielmi Raleigh 

* Michelle Lee Hall Henderson 

* Theresa Ann Holland Ocean 

H** Lisa Kay Jackson Gamer 

Jennifer Kirsten Johnson Chapel Hill 

*** Jennifer Maureen Kilgore Tallahassee, FL 

+* Dwight Dean King Clinton 

Zachary Tyler Kirby Newton 

* Sarah Lynn Kotzan Raleigh 

+ Donna Elizabeth Liberman Charlotte 

* Robin Rebecca Lloyd Raleigh 

Rhonda Beth Lowe Asheboro 

Jessica Marchegiano Ellicott City, MD 

Craig Steven Martin Cary 

Christina Diane McCormick Asheville 

Melissa Shuford McLamb Gastonia 

** Angelina Sabrina Mink Augusta, GA 

Sherry Renee Mote Elizabethtown 

Seth Robert Novak Spartanburg, SC 

** Kristin Rebecca Orris Frederick, MD 

** Amy Rebecca Otwell Greensboro 

** Kevin Archer Pelphrey Raleigh 

SH** Kristopher Jason Preacher Hickory 

*♦ Tammy Dupree Proctor Gamer 

** Sally Ann Prosser Charlotte 

* Laura Anne Rankin Lexington 

Kelly Marie Richards Smithfield 

*** Kristina Michelle Ringler Raleigh 

Moses Christopher Rogers Goldsboro 

Michelle Lee Rousseau Gamer 

Addie Rawlinson Schoonmaker Concord 

Lisa Colleen Schuster Moodus, CT 

*** Patricia Ann Shaughnessy Raleigh 

* Connie Lee Shelton Raleigh 

Lorrie Michelle Shope Asheville 

Kepner McMillan Short Charlotte 

*** Jeannie Gail SifFord Monroe 

Aaron Soto Levttown, NY 

Karen Diana Stuart Gamer 

H** Valerie Tavares Frederick, MD 

Carriann Melane Thomas Greensboro 

* Terri Dale Thomas Sanford 

♦Co-major H Honors Prograin S University Sdiolan PmgTain 

'CumLaude ••MagnaCum Laude '"SummaCuniLaude 

13 



Rebekah Wren Thompson Lumberton 

** Becki Lynn Truscott Hickory 

Jason Nolan Turtle Denver 

Sarah Deming Vardell Charlotte 

Jason Andrew Vigilante Morris Plains, NJ 

Christopher Eugene Washburn Marion 

Cathy Lynn Watkins Newton Grove 

* Sabrina Webb Rocky Mount 

Mary Florence Williams Durham 

*♦* Scott Andrew Wowra Raeford 

*** Linda Rawlings Youmans Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Education, General Studies 

Damien Shawn Bridges High Point 

+ Dwight Dale Hill, Jr Clayton 

Sheila Kay Williamson Raleigh 

Health Occupations Teacher Education 

Barry Dean Watkins Durham 

Mathematics Education 

Jennifer Marsh Brooks Monroe 

+**♦ Kerry Eleanore Buckley Raleigh 

* Christopher Louis Capps Raleigh 

** Bente Jensen Casile Raleigh 

Amy Kathleen Doster Concord 

Amy Leigh Durham Greensboro 

S+*** Derek Brent Efird Chapel Hill 

Paige Penelope Etheridge Eagleville, PA 

** Claire Lynn Gilstrap Roanoke Rapids 

*♦ Mark Spence Hartman New Bern 

S+*** Jason Donald Home Richlands 

* Kevin Eugene Hubbard Greenville 

Jeffrey Travis Hunt Mt. Pleasant 

** Andrew Euisung Jung Sanford 

*** Patrick Lerome Leary Vanceboro 

+**♦ Thomas Aaron Ledford Bakersville 

Dorothy Cummins Malpass Turkey 

+ Leonard Albert Marcacci Winston-Salem 

Ronnie Lee McMasters Wilmington 

* Rebecca Lynn Oxholm Raleigh 

S+** Amber Lee Radachovsky Fayetteville 

S-t-*** Matthew John Smith Goldsboro 

** Haley Kristen Stephenson Raleigh 

Kenisia Danette Turrentine Moncure 

* Benny Holt Wood Fayetteville 



+Co-ma|or H Honois Program S Univa^ty SdioUn Program 

•CumLaude • 'Magna Cum Laudc •••SummaCura Laude 

14 



Mathematics Education, Middle Grades 

Jennifer Lynn Cheeic Wilson 

* Michael Bryan Hall Creedmoor 

Language Arts and Social Studies, Middle Grades 

Emmanuel Jerrod Barnes Danville, VA 

* Jennifer DeAnn Hargenrader Tylersburg, PA 

** Michele Harler Ingrao Warren, MI 

Laurie Ann Lanvermeier Jacksonville 

Laura Page Rankin Statesville 

* Jennifer Carol Rose Tarboro 

*** Kathleen Ryan VanOrmer Summerfield 

Math and Science, Middle Grades 

Wayne Leon Williams Henderson 

Science Education 

* John Daniel Allen Harmony 

*♦ John Floyd Couse Brownville, NY 

Kevin Matthew Hudson Gastonia 

Willie Cyrus Jarman Jacksonville 

Kimberly Ann Kirby Wilmington 

S** Jenifer Irene Libby New Bern 

Alan Timothy Metcalf , Spindale 

Delores Irene Miller Rowland 

* Heather Elizabeth Owens Oxford 

** Jeff Stephen Shields Chapel Hill 

♦** Lisa Jane Sitek Durham 

Ann Lee Weathers Rocky Mount 

** Christopher Lee Williams Rose Hill 

Robin Harmon Zook Wilmington 

Science Education, Middle Grades 

Saretha Rebecca Boggs Concord 

* Laura Parker Hicks Roxboro 

* Kristen Joy Kubacki Raleigh 

Kelly Dyane Mance Marion 

* Jennifer Christy Whitaker Monroe 

Technology Education 

James Walter Brown III Durham 

Bryan Pearce Carpenter Jacksonville, FL 

Eric Maurice James Maple Hill 

Michael Anthony Parks Charlotte 

David Scott Peterson Wilmington 

William Cecil Reece Whitsett 



+Co-iiBior H Honon Program S Univenio Scholars Program 

'CumLaude • •Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCuro Laude 

15 



Anthony Michael Riley Laguna Pueblo, NM 

Brian Thomas Smith Salisbury 

Stephen Bradford Stillman Wilson 

Sean Walford Thompson Wilmington 

Oai Chi To Charlotte 



College of Engineering 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

♦** Robert Bourke Christian Chapel Hill 

Bryan Paul Clark Newton 

Scott James Frederick Raleigh 

Benjamin Scott Gresham King And Queen C.H., VA 

Herbert Louis Hales II Kenly 

+ Jenifer Lynn Jordan Pittsboro 

Gary Charles Miller Gary 

* Benjamin Scott Mitchell Gates 

♦♦* Christopher Thomas Mosley Tarboro 

Robyn Jeanette Mullen Raleigh 

Christopher Vance Norville Ellenboro 

** Jeffrey Michael Parker Albemarle 

Jan Marie Patterson Jackson Springs 

Brian Matthew Simpson Marshville 

David McKinley Stein, Jr Fayetteville 

Scott Avery Vinson Maury 

Jason Herman Wilson Henderson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

Michael Thomas Prange Salisbury 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Textiles and the College of Engineering. 

Robert Arnold Baker Clayton 

Stacey Lynne Bolen Washington 

♦ Brad Alan Dickinson Charlotte 

♦♦♦ Jaren Jacob Edwards Stanley 



+Co-nKgor H Honon Program S Uimersity Sdiolan Program 

'CumLaide **MagnaCumLaudc ***SumniaCumL.aude 

16 



LeeAnn Fish Yadkinville 

* Sarah Louise Green Zebulon 

*** Steven Craig Hamrick Shelby 

Mark Gregory Hofberg Burlington 

Walter Jason Johnson Greensboro 

* Anh-Kiet Dang Pham Hickory 

* Claudia Rebecca Rose Shelby 

Donnie Lee Shackelford High Point 

Monroe Keith Spillman, Jr Salisbury 

Jeffrey Steven Thomas Gastonia 

Cynthia Marie Watta Raleigh 

Loyd Chadwick Whitmire Conover 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Edgar Miller Baker, Jr Raeford 

* John Edward Bradford Charlotte 

John David Bullock Havelock 

*** Eric Noboru Burcsu Cary 

S+*** Andrew Michael Crocker Fayetteville 

Christina Leanne Culler Boone 

Charles Alvin Daniels, Jr Rocky Mount 

Jeremy Wayne Everhart Asheboro 

Christopher Nathan Graham Gastonia 

* Laura Ann Kelly Sanford 

** Robert James McDonald Havelock 

Anthony Shawn Meadows Goidsboro 

* Scott Casey Moore Asheville 

Brian James Stoll Menasha, WI 

Doron Strassman Gamer 

*** Amita Maria Tripathi Paris, France 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Ronald Clifford Albright Raleigh 

Debra Ann Ashley Lexington 

*** Melinda Gail Auman Seagrove 

+ Dehavalyn Sherrell Black Winston-Salem 

*** Matthew Vincent Brandon Greensboro 

**♦ Lonnie Jay Brenner Midland, Ml 

Jacquelyn Denise Bright Washington 

Matthew Aaron Campbell Raleigh 

Mark Douglas Cheshire Kinston 

Michael Allen Cichoracki Raleigh 

+* Donna Lynn Cleaton Dinwiddle, VA 

+ Michael Grant Dodds Oxford 

Kimberly Jeanine Faircloth Roseboro 

S*** Brian Keith Franklin Raleigh 

** James Troy Gard Hertford 

S*** Robin Lynne Grice Raleigh 

** Daniel Ryan Griffin Hendersonville 

* Richard Paige Gwaltney Eden 

♦Co-major H Honors Progjam S Unhasit>' Sdiolars Program 

•CumLaude "MagiaCum Lxtde •••SummaCum Laudc 

17 



Geoffrey Alan Hensley Marion 

James Brian Herring Lumberton 

**♦ Jennifer Leigh Hill Holly Springs 

John Harold Hincks Raleigh 

S+*** Ryan David Hobbs New Bern 

Sayed Hassan Hosseini Cary 

Jason Matthew Huckaby Charlotte 

+ Reginald Bryan Jones Marion 

+** Shannon Elizabeth Jones High Point 

Durwood Michael Karr Wallburg 

Scott Jefferson Kelley Raleigh 

♦* Erik Joseph Kouba Winston-Salem 

Christopher Michael Kurinec Weare, NH 

+♦ Harry Atkins Lawton III Kingsport, TN 

+ Michael Robert Lemanski Durham 

Graham Lee Lentz Maxton 

Kimberly Katherine Lewis Lawesville 

Daniel Alan Lloyd , Raleigh 

Brian Matthew Lora Raleigh 

* James Daniel Lowder New London 

*** Richard Allen Lutz Raleigh 

Eric David Lynch Raleigh 

+** Joseph Eliot Malak Cumberland, MD 

*** Stephanie Anja Manfredi Hickory 

** Ranjit Kumar Mathur Cary 

Carlotta Michelle Mattison Anderson, SC 

*** Becky Richelle McCuen Roanoke Rapids 

Matthew Russell McMenamin Philadelphia, PA 

S*** Dennis Holt McNeill Norwood 

Stephen Patrick Merrell Hendersonville 

Christopher Michael Miller Waukesha, WI 

*** Dawn Michelle Misenheimer Pleasant Garden 

* Kimberly Evette Mitchell Middlesex 

** Roger Issa Nesheiwat Raleigh 

S** Scott Allen Olsen Raleigh 

S+*** John Caviness O'Quinn Fuquay-Varina 

Felicia Salome Parham Milledgeville, GA 

Tommy Ennis Patterson Burlington 

Keith Martin Petschke Raleigh 

Melanie Rose Pfister Waxhaw 

Hieu Trung Pham Greensboro 

S** Anna Michelle Phillips Raleigh 

* Howard Bethea Powell Polkville 

+* Robert Baxter Powell Raleigh 

Jamaica Lynn Prince Tabor City 

+ Michael Schwarz Rambusch Asheboro 

♦*♦ Rohit Kishor Rathi Pune, India 

+ Loletta Catrice Redmon Brewton, AL 

* Banu Refik Nicosia, North Cyprus 

* Sami Paavo Rennes Raisio, Finland 

Mark Andrew Rogerson Hickory 

* Shelley Lynn Rommelmann Raleigh 

+Co-niajor H Honors Program S Universiry Scholars Program 

'CumLaude ••MagnaCum Laude ***SummaCum Laude 

18 



John Greg Rubish St Croix, Virgin Islands 

♦♦ Christine Josephine Schneider Greensboro 

Carroll Regan Scott Morganton 

**♦ Smitesh Praful Shah Conover 

* Nicholas Sheble Raleigh 

Kara Leigh Stack Charlotte 

*♦ Melvin Shannon Stanforth Greenville 

S** Wendy Lynn Taylor Raleigh 

Kimberly Ann Thompson Bowie, MD 

** Michael Joseph Wiggins Gastonia 

Hobert Earl Williams, Jr Pinehurst 

James Bradley Wilson Roanoke Rapids 

+*♦* Elizabeth Ann Wones Kettering, OH 

John Chris Zachary Lumberton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Naser Moh'd Abu-Halimeh Amman, Jordan 

Ayman Ismail Alqudwah Raleigh 

+ Scott Warden Angell East Bend 

Wayne Edgar Beckingham Topsail Beach 

♦♦ Tatjana Blell Belgrade, Yugosla 

** Jason Thomas Broome Monroe 

Mary Pate Butier Albermarle 

* Richard Leigh Butt Virginia Beach, VA 

* Joseph Washington Chandler Eden 

**♦ Michael Louis Cifaldi Farmingdale, NY 

Jeffrey Wyatt Coonse Lenior 

Jeffery Ward Dale Rocky Mount 

Bryan Creighton Dean Raleigh 

Dana Marie Dellinger Monroe 

James Allen Dodson Roseboro 

William Carroll Duncan Richmond, VA 

+ Donald Webster Edge III Fayetteville 

Ronald Dale Ferguson Cameron 

S+** Pamela Beth Fordham Annapolis, MD 

David Randall Hatch Charlotte 

Andrew Douglas Hayden Raleigh 

Robert Edward Isgett III Darlington, SC 

Christopher Scott Johnson Raleigh 

Paul Jeffrey Kallam Brodnax, VA 

* Sachiyo Kawaguchi Osaka-Shi Osaka, Japan 

Daniel Ashley Keir Wilmington 

Daniel Robert Kelly, Jr Charlotte 

Alton Jeffrey King Hendersonville 

S+** Joel Lee Madden Charlotte 

Dimitri Alexander Mavropoulos Fayetteville 

** Charles Scarboro Nail III Sanford 

Brent Thomas Niemann Zebulon 

* Raymond D. Odell Alexandria, LA 

* Jason Todd Orthner Raleigh 

S** Adam Douglas Overbay Hickory 

+Co-major H Honors Program S Univenity Sdiolan Program 

*CumLaude ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laudc 

19 



Charles Russell Overton Ahoskie 

Donald Modis Perry Whitakers 

* Robert Anthony Pruett Baltimore, MD 

♦ Thomas Brian Query Matthews 

♦ David Clifford Revoir Clarksburg, MD 

+* Alena Rittenhouse Clayton 

Neal Alexander Rutherford III Charlotte 

Edward Otha Sasser, Jr Clayton 

Reece Martin Schuler Raleigh 

Christine Maya Sellon Jacksonville 

Jack Lawrence Sharp, Jr Summerfield 

Erich William Strohhacker Lincolnton 

Carrie Elizabeth Styers Greensboro 

♦♦ Michael Neal Surasky Monmouth Junction, NJ 

Shawn Aaron Troy Raleigh 

William Howard Wilfong Wilmington 

+ William Roy Wilhelm Kemersville 

Eric Noland Williams Morganton 

Shane Douglas York Sanford 

** David Ryan Young Raleigh 

+ Robert J. Ziemba Sicklerville, NJ 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING - CONSTRUCTION OPTION 

Eddie Victor Bishop Brooklyn, NY 

Joseph Donald Brady Greensboro 

James Fillmore Chandler, Jr Selma 

Kevin Bryan Conner Chadboum 

*** John Thomas Delzell Greensboro 

John Kelly Dunn Durham 

Lisa Dawn Hudnall Chapel Hill 

** David Wayne Lipe China Grove 

George Jackson Liverman Mufreesboro 

Jeffrey Boyd Malpass Delco 

David Scott Mclntyre, Jr Shelby 

David Gray Modlin Raleigh 

+ Darby Lee-Alan Owenby Andrews 

Todd Andrew Schurig Concord 

Lassie Lucian Scott III Cameron 

*** Victor Cameron Smith Wrightsville Beach 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

Maher Mahmoud Abukaf Raleigh 

S** Jonathan David Ames Greenville 

* Ryan Jeffrey Baucom Raleigh 

Steven Douglas Beeson Raleigh 

S+** Jan Martin Borgersen Charlotte 

+* Jonathan Michael Butzke Cary 

**♦ Deepak Chugh New Delhi, India 

Matthew Vance Cooley Tigerville, SC 

S*** Joseph Anthony Delgross Cary 

♦Co-major H Honors Program S University SdioUn Program 

•Cum Laude ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laude 

20 



Peter Bacon Forrester Lincolnton 

S+** Peter Nabih Ghali Raleigh 

+ William James Harriss Fuquay-Varina 

Phillip Foil Holshouser Albermarle 

Brian Lee Jacobs Yorktown, VA 

** Kevin Christopher Jaget Charlotte 

Andrew Brooks Jarrell Mars Hill 

* Andrew David Jones Jacksonville 

+ James Franklin Jones Winston Salem 

Malaciah E. Jones Clayton 

* Kevin James Keiser Milpitas, CA 

+ Thay Khang Newton 

Sean Philip Korb Raleigh 

John Curtis Layton Traverse City, MI 

+ Christopher Allen Leazer Mooresville 

+ Steven Michael Lovett Fairmont, WV 

+*♦ Salman Hamid Maher Bennington, VT 

Andrew Colin McDannold Tampa, FL 

Christopher John McGee Raleigh 

* Brandon Shawn Morgan Salisbury 

Phong Thanh Nguyen Hickory 

* William Augustus Parvin Washington 

Richard Wayne Pearson, Jr Raleigh 

Sean Michael Scoggins Raleigh 

+*♦ Bhairav Suresh Shah Raleigh 

Rodney Wayne Smith Wilmington 

Nguyen Van Tran Henderson 

Terri Marie VanderWerff Antioch, CA 

+♦ Kent Cushman Voorhees Greensboro 

Jason Monroe Williams Lincolnton 

Jack Dalton Woodring Nashville, TN 

* Edward Victor Zorek Salter Path 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

*** Matthew Christopher Anderson Raleigh 

Ronald Frank Batcho, Jr Kill Devil Hills 

Billy Joe Bissette Bailey 

Michael Ken Brame Raleigh 

David Christopher Brogdon Wilmington 

Antonio Wayne Cameron Middlesex 

David Richard Castranio Cary 

Gregory Scott Cohoon Bowie, MD 

Jennifer Anne Godkin Lemon Springs 

*** Joel Brian Gray Mt Airy 

* Wu-Chen Jong Durham 

Carolyn Booth Knott Durham 

*♦* Anton Kristiawan Indonesia 

Marcus Alan Lamb Marion 

Seung Hee Lee Raleigh 

John Carl Robert Lentz Kingston, NY 

+** Salman Hermet Maher Bennington, VT 

+Co-irajor H Honors Program S University Sdiolai^ Program 

*Cuml-3ude **MagnaCum Laude ♦••SummaCum I_audc 

21 



* Michael Ronn Marcelais Durham 

Kenneth Marvin McEntire, Jr Cary 

* Brandt Eduard Obermeit Kenly 

John Christopher O'Neill Chapel Hill 

S** Norman Alan Oursland Asheville 

Scott Graham Parkerson Charlotte 

* Justin Everett Pinnix Apex 

James Michael Presto Rougemont 

Phillip Allen Richardson Raleigh 

* Asha Oni Rucker Statesville 

Brian George Rumple Graham 

Enayetullah Shabon Cary 

Earl Richardson Shannon Fayetteville 

Debra Kay Sherrill Raleigh 

Jerome Edward Sienkiewicz Charlotte 

David Kenneth Smith, Jr Germanton 

Nathan Phillip Stewart Julian 

Saymai Thammavong Raleigh 

* Brandon Wayne Troutman Concord 

Paula Sexton Violet Atkins, VA 

Daniel James Waller Ahoskie 

Toni Genee Whitaker Rocky Mount 

Madison Neal Whitten III Raleigh 

* Scott Timothy Wilson Binghamton, NY 

* Rizka Windiastuti Jakarta, Indonesia 

* Craig Pinnell Wright Indianapolis, IN 

* Jason Adam Young Gamer 

David Charles Zahn Manteo 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 

+ Darby Lee-Alan Owenby Andrews 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

* Ian Beavers Raleigh 

Anthony Wayne Bhe Fayetteville 

♦* Ottis Kendrick Black III Shawboro 

Christopher George Bohner Treuorton, PA 

S+** Jan Martin Borgersen Charlotte 

* Tyler Andrew Buckner Marshall 

♦* Tien Hy Bui Winston-Salem 

+* Jonathan Michael Butzke Cary 

Nathaniel Lee Chavis Red Springs 

S*** Michael Chou Durham 

Edward James Coyne Kemersville 

* William Michael Davis Alloway, NJ 

*** Roy Lee Draughn Asheboro 

Barry Allen DuFresne Almond 

** Brian Edward Durham Asheboro 

William Charles Earnhardt Salisbury 

* Richard Maurice Flack, Jr Winston-Salem 

*Co-maior H Honore PrDgram S UnKxraty Scholar Program 

•CumLaudc ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SununaCum Laude 

22 



Chris Derek Formy-Duval Durham 

John Clayton Foster Greensboro 

Keith Matthew Gailey Burlington 

*♦ Kenny Gentile Bahama 

S+** Peter Nabih Ghali Raleigh 

*♦ Dwaine Charles Gonyier Goldsboro 

+ William James Harriss Fuquay-Varina 

Omar Aref Hassan Raleigh 

Jody Miller Haynes Elkin 

♦ David Rudolph Hendricks Louisville, KY 

Michael Christopher Hughes Charlotte 

S Brian Keith Jones Summerfield 

+* James Franklin Jones Winston Salem 

♦ Judy Coble Keadle Gary 

James Patrick Keil Asheville 

+ Thay Khang Newton 

Richard Dale Lancaster Goldsboro 

+ Christopher Allen Leazer Mooresville 

+ Steven Michael Lovett Fairmont, WV 

*♦* H. Andrew Mayo Homell, NY 

Michael Scott Moore Winston-Salem 

Steven Todd Moore High Point 

*** Roger Douglas Morgan Salisbury 

Wesley Clayton Musselwhite St. Pauls 

Hyoung Gyun Noh Fairfax, VA 

** Shwetalkumar Arvindbhai Patel Madison 

♦ Deward Victor Pepper, Jr Durham 

♦ David Alan Pitts Winston Salem 

Daniel James Piatt Clinton 

*♦ Michael Ernest Purcell, Jr Kemersville 

David Andrew Ray Fayetteville 

** Devin Bryan Ridge Greensboro 

S* Daniel Scott Schudel Gastonia 

Kyle Matthew Sefton Boone 

Jef&ey Andrew Shafer Raleigh 

+** Bhairav Suresh Shah Raleigh 

Mark Thomas Shelton Manteo 

Gregory Shane Shook Canton 

Gregory Thomas Slusher Monroe 

Brian O'Neal Smidi Pleasant Hill 

S*** Sarah Knox Soutter RaJeigh 

Stephen Michael Spicer Knightdale 

♦ Joseph Kirt Storie Lenoir 

♦** Mark Alan Summers Robbins 

John Fitzgerald Troutman Rocky Mount 

** Jason Matthew Tschupp Cary 

*** Jan Edward Vandemeer Pleasant Valley, NY 

Francisco Xavier Viego Wilmington 

Joseph Anthony Volk III Gastonia 

+* Kent Cushman Voorhees Greensboro 

Vincent Avery Walker Kings Mountain 

S*** Michael Bradley Wallace Fayetteville 

-fCo-maior H Honon Program S Uiiivast>' ScfaoUn Prograin 

'CumLaude **MagiuCuni Laude ***SununaCuiii Laudc 

23 



Michael Bowden Warren Newton Grove 

Geoffrey Bradford Watson Charlotte 

S** Glenn Douglas Weeks Kemersville 

Adam Justice White Salisbury 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

David Anderson Allen Charlotte 

+ Scott Warden Angell East Bend 

Leon Warren Bakely III Kinston 

** Ravindra Bissram Roanoke Rapids 

Timothy David Boomhower Fuquay Varina 

Brian Douglas Brickman Raleigh 

Edward Brian Burkhart Albemarle 

♦* Joni Lea Cardin , Dallas 

Stephen Joel Christman Eden 

** Eric Wayne Coates Cary 

Douglas Allen Denney Newport 

+ Donald Webster Edge III Fayetteville 

Katie Ann Elmer Milford, UT 

Steven Christopher Frank Plymouth 

Brian Ashley Hall Eden 

Marcia Lorraine Novier Kankelfritz Sanford 

Bryan Douglas Lange Chapel Hill 

Kingsuk Mallik Greensboro 

Scott Andrew McCorkle Hampstead 

Kevin Scott Misenheimer Charlotte 

Ly Thao Nguyen Charlotte 

Clifton Thomas Register Shelby 

* Jason Roy Rimel Wilmington 

+* Alena Rittenhouse Clayton 

Larry Daniel Robinson, Jr Mt. Gilead 

** Barbara Ann Sich Wilmington 

** Lewis Clifford Snyder Lavelle, PA 

♦* Brooks Walton Strickler Wilmington 

Jeffrey David Sturm Byron Center, MI 

Kevin Marshall Styers Clemmons 

David Lauck Teague High Point 

+ William Roy Wilhelm Kemersville 

David Lee Winstead Rocky Mount 

+♦** Patrick Cecil Winstead Winterville 

** Susan Elizabeth Winstead Sharpsburg 

+ Robert J. Ziemba Sicklerville, NJ 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT 

David Ralph Mullis Morganton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Eric Jason Alverson Huntersville 

Derek Louis Beck Raleigh 

•^Co-major H Honon Program S Unheratj' Scholars Program 

*CumLaude • •Magna Cum Laudc •••SummaCum Laude 

24 



♦*♦ Paula Lynn Borden Columbus, OH 

Sonya Jeannine Braam Raleigh 

Christopher John Brown Broadway 

Daryel Lee Brown Greensboro 

Gidget Michele Chandler Marshall 

Andrew Harris Clemmer Kingsport, TN 

Kevin John Cooper Matthews 

Ryan Todd Craig Raleigh 

John Benson Crocker Greensboro 

** Aimee Lea Cunningham Apex 

♦ Brian Lee Dula Morganton 

Timothy Alan Farley Brevard 

Shonda Levon Punches Charlotte 

Matthew Scott Griffin Chesapeake, VA 

Lisa Myra Gustincic Winston Salem 

Marleigh Melanie Haigler Monroe 

Tonya Hope Jordan West Jefferson 

Samuel Burgin Kale III Morehead 

♦*♦ Joel Alan Langley Richmond, VA 

Phillip Ray Larkins, Jr Rocky Point 

Jennifer Michelle Lemly . West Jefferson 

Kristina Elise Lindblad Columbia, MD 

Andrew Thompson LoBean Franklin 

♦ Christopher Gowen Manley Bangkok, Thailand 

Mark Richard Manning Bloomington, MN 

Kristen Lee Mathews Cary 

Michael Lee McLamb Smithfield 

♦ Wilda Kara Moon Greensboro 

** James Kenneth Murray Castle Hayne 

Teresa Lynn Odenwald Derwood, MD 

Jeffery Allen Payne Raleigh 

♦♦ Jason William Peele Elkin 

Issa Ibrahim Rafidi Raleigh 

Elizabeth Brandon Sell Monroe 

Richard Earl Sessoms, Jr Durham 

Stephen Walter Sumner Dobson 

♦ Maureen Wyn Taylor Charlotte 

Timothy Renn Thomas Elizabethtown 

Marty Eugene Walker Roaring River 

Betty Louise Walters Concord 

Elizabeth Hope Wells Wilson 

Vema Hollis Wilkes Brevard 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRUL ENGINEERING - FURNITURE 
MANUFACTURING 

♦ Luke Douthit Barger Hickory 

David Allen Jetton II Lenoir 

Timothy Joe Moore Ellerbe 

Larry Eugene Osbome Asheboro 

Susan Kim Russell Taylorsville 



♦Co-major H Honore Program S UnKerat)- Sdiolan Prognm 

*CumL3ude **Ma£naCuin Laude ***5uminaCum Laude 

25 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

William Edward Bass Matthews 

Richard Gregory Blake, Jr Newport 

Jason Todd Bowden Fayetteville 

S+*** Michael Thomas Capps Wilmington 

Kevin Christopher Cheek Raleigh 

Adam Joseph Christopherson Washington 

Gregory Thomas Dunne Raleigh 

Tucker Philips Harrison Mebane 

Neil Blair Howard . Raleigh 

Susan Agneta Lloyd Chapel Hill 

Jamie Milton Lohr Kemersville 

S** Julie Patricia Martin Charlotte 

** Michelle Denise Morse Fuquay Varina 

S** Francis Brent Neal, Jr Rockingham 

* Charles Bernard Parker Cary 

Robert Shawn Pyles Wilmington 

Thomas Wayne Salter Mooresville 

♦** Corey Jon Senowitz Raleigh 

Jason Taylor Smith Raleigh 

Shonda Nicole Smith Asheville 

Howard Levone Toomer Rocky Mount 

Elliott Lee Turbeville Charlotte 

Jonathan Lee Walbom West Hurley, NY 

Jeremy Allen Walraven Trenton, NJ 

Nathaniel Mark Williams Hurdle Mills 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

William Joseph Albright Kemersville 

* Chad William Albury Spanish Wells, Bahamas 

Brandon Blair Arthurs Gastonia 

Paxton Christopher Augustine Durham 

*♦* Jaimison Whitcliff Baker Greensboro 

Lee Edgar Baker Wingate 

* Antony Bautista La Mirada, CA 

Kurt Bombien Charlotte 

John R. Boswell III Burlington 

* Brian Keith Breiholz Kill Devil Hills 

William Christopher Burkett Hickory 

♦* Peter Vernon Caldwell Boca Raton, FL 

David Brandon Calloway Asheville 

Matthew Allen Cemiway South Mills 

* Kali Graham Champion Shelby 

Kristen Rose Ciresi Boonton Twp., NJ 

Beniamino Bernard Citarelli Durham 

Daniel Martin Clark Chapel Hill 

Derrick Rodney Coates Fayetteville 

Michael Christopher Cox Goldsboro 

Amy Lynn Culbreth Charlotte 

*♦* Daniel Marion Deaton Taboro City 

•fCo-major H Honors PiDgram S Univosil) Scholars Program 

'CumLaude ••MagnaCum Laude ***SuniinaCuinLaudc 

26 



** Anthony Shane Duttera Westminster, MD 

** Christopher Marie Elliott Asheville 

Marie Richard Ellis Goldsboro 

Alexander Thomas Evans Roxboro 

Lemuel David Fagan Pascaqoula, MI 

Jeffrey Dwayne Farris Greensboro 

Michael Dae Kyu Fewel Chapel Hill 

Scott Patrick Fey Pinehurst 

Quicha Nichanda Floyd Greensboro 

Carl Joseph Friedrich Raleigh 

* Fred William Garbrecht, Jr Pollock, LA 

Samuel Boyd Gardner Raleigh 

*♦♦ Charles Walton Grant Raleigh 

Christopher Michael Grawburg Wilson 

** Loren Richard Gulak Richmond, VA 

Michael Lawrence Hall Fayetteville 

Travis Andrew Hall Belmont, MI 

Gary Vincent Harding Jamestown 

Lake Anthony Herman Southern Pines 

* Scott Michael Houston West Wood, NJ 

Andrew Shore Howard Greensboro 

Brian Scott James High Point 

Michael Lee James Lexington 

** Michael Dennis Johnson Jamestown, NY 

Charlie Edmond Jones Burlington 

+ Jenifer Lynn Jordan Pittsboro 

** Andrew Kelley III Harmony, MD 

Dana Mason Kenyon Hillsborough 

Bryan Matthew Killian Wilmington 

Samuel Bryan Kimpton Tryon 

Alan Lee King Horse Shoe 

* Kevin Darrell King Mount Olive 

Marcus Keith Kraushaar Murphy 

Michael Paul Kurtzman High Point 

Glenn Martin Kvemeland Statesville 

Clement King-Bong Kwok Raleigh 

* William Patrick Lawrence Havelock 

Melvin Ray Lee, Jr Snow Hill 

♦* Patrick Ta Chin Lee Greenville 

Brad Scott Lockhart Raleigh 

Calvin Lamon Lopez Fayetteville 

William Thomas Lowery II Pittsboro 

Christopher Van Lyles Winston-Salem 

* Keith Foster Lyonnais New Bedford, MA 

*♦ Michael Stephen Matson Raleigh 

S*** Aaron Philip Maurer Raleigh 

* Douglas Wayne McCall High Point 

Mack Woodside McGowan Charlotte 

Cheryl Lovelle McKay Charlotte 

* William Chad McNeill Asheboro 

Kent Aaron Meyer Bellefontaine, OH 

Derek Gordon Miller Willow Springs 

+Co-inajor H Honore Program S Unh osit) Sdiolan Piograni 

*CiiniLaude **MagnaCuin Laudc ***SuniiiiaCumLaudc 

27 



Neil Matthew Moser Mount Pleasant 

Joshua David Myers N. Wilkesboro 

Wayne Oscar Nitzschner Kingston, NY 

Dana Danielle Nolen Kings Mountain 

Eric William Nordquist Lexington, SC 

Wendell Culbreth Owen II Raleigh 

Christopher Rudolph Pait Tarheel 

John Claude Parris Sylva 

Chester Andrew Parsons Snow Hill, MD 

* Brian Robert Philbeck Raleigh 

Clifford Bryon Phipps Portmouth, VA 

Jack O'Bryan Powell, Jr Raleigh 

Paul Michael Ramoino Pittsburgh, PA 

Walton Brown Ray Rural Hall 

S+* Chad William Rehder Raleigh 

* Jimmie Leonard Rich Kenansville 

* Howard Jerome Rigsby Asheville 

Keith William Rising Dunwoody, GA 

S+*** Catherine Michelle Rose Reidsville 

Brian Charles Rulifson Raleigh 

Jamison Taylor Sasser Fredricktown, OH 

* Christopher Mark Sauritch Apex 

♦* Bradley Kent Shepard Jacksonville 

Robert Andrew Sizemore, Jr Raleigh 

Eric Stephen Smith Montville, NJ 

Peter Blake Stelling Nashville 

Kevin Wayne Stephenson Willow Springs 

* Donald Henry Stiel Charlotte 

Jerome William Tester Greensboro 

S Steve Sherwood Thompson Wilmington 

* Dane Andrew Tipton Cary 

Jennifer Elaine Toscano Montville, NJ 

S*** Thomas Marshall Tucker Cahriotte 

Patrick Stephen VanVickle Sedalia, MO 

Brian Trent Vaughn Burlington 

Marko Nicholas Veil Saluda 

* Charles Philip Warlick '. . . • Cary 

Philip Hargett Warren Raleigh 

Kevin Lee Waters Kinston 

Woodrow Thomas Webb III Summerfield 

Frederick Child Whitney Havelock 

** Richard Allan Willard Pinnacle 

Brian Joseph Wilson Raleigh 

Christina Lenore Woodman Ayden 

* Forrest Stephen Yount Morganton 

Thomas Andrew Zdunczyk Greensboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

♦♦ Marvin Hugh Bamett III Washington 

Rhonda Karen Corzine Wilmington 

Anthony George Green Fayetteville 

+Co-iiia|or H Honors Program S Universit> Scholars Program 

•Cum Laudc ••MagnaCum Laude •••SiunmaCum Laude 

28 



* David Thompson Hart Morehead City 

*♦♦ Nathan Phillip Sutton Charlotte 

♦♦ Mary Thi Van Thomasville 

Christopher Mitchell Ward Tabor City 




College of Forest Resources 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FOREST MANAGEMENT 

Andrew Lee Baker Marion 

Jennifer Lea Barnes Duluth, GA 

Adam Franklin Brewer Oxford 

+ Douglas Carter Burleson Lumberton 

Jeffrey Lane Correll Hudson 

John Wesley Coulston Mocksville 

Kevin Todd Dowdle Denton 

Derrick Robbins Faw Lansing 

S*** Kevin Wayne Gainey Kannapolis 

Kevin Brent Harvell Greensboro 

♦♦♦ Karin Havlin Hess Raleigh 

Alan Walker Roe Hill Waynesville 

Thomas Edward Huffman Belews Creek 

+** Barry Clayton Jackson, Jr Raleigh 

Thomas William Lane, Jr Butner 

Michael Troy Lucas Charlotte 

Roger Louis Mabry, Jr Norwood 

Brian Eugene Medlock Dallas 

Keith Ray Money Lexington 

Ryan Thomas Norris Wilmington 

Jeffrey Stephen Page Chattanooga, TN 

Kyle Eugene Parshall Raleigh 

Teresa Kisamore Serbyn Riverton, WV 

James Keith West Kinston 

♦ Philip Ralph Whitfield Hurdle Mills 

Randall Thomas Witt Raleigh 

Brian Lucas Wood Siler City 

Christopher Crossland Yauger Cameron 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL RESOURCES 

Randall Nathan Barefoot Clinton 

Pamela Roxana Boyle Fayetteville 

*♦ Cynthia Diane Buster Alexandria, VA 

Brandon Lea DeRosa Sevema Park, MD 

Jodi Lynn Farlow Trinity 

Susan Ivy Fay Raleigh 



+Co-iiiajor H Honon Program S Univcraty Sdiolan Program 

*CumLaide **M^gn3Cum Laude ***SumfiiaCum Laude 

29 



Michael Guise Frisk Arlington, VA 

+♦* Barry Clayton Jackson, Jr Raleigh 

Eric Shaw McGee Asheville 

Larissa Noelle McGinnis Shelby 

Thomas Lindsey Riddick, Jr Hertford 

George Tillman Swearingen III Charlotte 

Michael Walker Team Raleigh 

Julia Anne Teasley Durham 

Douglas Ray Thomas Climax 

Robert Jeremy Willis Lenior 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM 
MANAGEMENT 

* Logan Harry Anderson Raleigh 

Hugh Devon Autry Coats 

Susan Alison Brown Raleigh 

Brandon Lee Duncan Whiteville 

Angela Holsclaw Field Durham 

Linster Frazier, Jr Havelock 

Keirstin Lynn Gondek Califon, NJ 

* Kimberly Baldwin Jordan Graham 

Clifford Banks Mason Morehead City 

Donna Judith Louise Mattingly St Louis, MO 

Kevin Wilson Randall Anson County 

*** James Gary Ray, Jr Winston Salem 

* Steven Gary Smith Advance 

Christopher Armondo Tortu Mayslanding, NJ 

Katherine Glenn Truluck Winston Salem 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Steven Christopher Bacon Dexter, GA 

Leigh Phipps Barr Jefferson 

Kendra Krystyna Batley Wilmington 

+ Dehavalyn Sherrell Black Winston-Salem 

S James Edwin Cawthome, Jr Lynchburg, VA 

+* Donna Lynn Cleaton Dinwiddle, VA 

David Russell Floyd Caledonia, MN 

S+*** Ryan David Hobbs New Bern 

+ Kevin Matthew Holtman Halifax, VA 

Todd Elliott Howell Roanoke Rapids 

* Phillip Todd Jordan Rock Hill, SC 

+* Harry Atkins Lawton III Kingsport, TN 

+** Joseph Eliot Malak Cumberiand, MD 

Michael Lloyd Moore Wilmington 

*** Wesley Boyd Petrea Kannapolis 

+ Monte Wayne Powell, Jr Clarendon 

+ Michael Schwarz Rambusch Asheboro 

+ Loletta Catrice Redmon Brewton, AL 

* Melissa Carol Ricks Wilmington 

♦♦ Timothy Lee Schleining Pisgah Forest 

+Co-niajor H Honors Program S Univa^it}' Scholars Program 

*CumLaude **MagnaCum Laude ***SummaCum Laude 

30 



Brian Timothy Spear Creswell 

Christopher Ryan West Williamston 

+♦♦♦ Elizabeth Ann Wones Kettering, OH 

S* Robert Chung-Hua Yang Chesterfield, VA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN WOOD PRODUCTS 

John Douglas Barkee Interlaken, NY 

* Joshua Warren Edwards Jackson 

Kyle Douglas Evans Marion 

Christopher Gregory Parrow Franklin, NY 

Michael-Jon McRae Tillman Virgina Beach, VA 

Jonathan David Whitley Williamston 



College of Humanities 
and Social Sciences 




BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION 

Joshua Benedict Adams Greensboro 

* Alicia Lynn Albee , Somerville, NJ 

Michelle Le Anne Ash Washington 

*♦* Jennifer Lee Autry Colonial Heights, VA 

Laura Dale Babinski Charlotte 

* Emery Lee Barker Asheboro 

* Brooke Allison Barnard Wilmington 

Reginald Tobias Barnes Danville, VA 

Shawna Marie Bamett Charlotte 

* Christine Barbara Baron Charlotte 

S** Angela Kay Basala Cary 

David Williams Blanton Kings Mountain 

** Michele Susan Borowsky Virginia Beach, VA 

Tonya Kemble Bowen Raleigh 

Kevin Michael Brewer High Point 

Dana Leigh Bridgeman Gastonia 

** Tami Michelle Campbell Gastonia 

Jennifer Kirkman Cline Greensboro 

Andrea Kay Collare Clemmons 

Ann McCarty Collins Raleigh 

Michelle Kathleen Connell New Bern 

Trean Camille Cook Denton 

Lloyd Ann Corbett Swansboro 

Cynthia Ann Crisco Albermarle 

* Katherine Luanne Crutchfield South Hill, VA 

Thomas Rayvon Daye Hillsborough 



+Co-niajor H Honors Program S Univenil) Scholars Program 

'CiunLaudc **MagnaCum Laudc ***SummaCumLaude 

31 



Kenneth Allen Deutsch II Fayetteville 

Paul James Doherty Raleigh 

Lisa Marie Donofrio Cary 

♦* Eileen Frances Duley Cary 

♦* Kayla Monique Duty Balboa, Republic of Panama 

Elizabeth Brant Eatman Raleigh 

Brenda Janelle Elliott Cary 

John Douglas Erhart Rockville, MD 

Robert Harrison Evans Greensboro 

* Alison Marie Fanner Lone Valley, NJ 

Charles Bryan Ferrell Dunn 

+ Leah Christine Fleischhauer Rhinebeck, NY 

Carlisle Yvette Fulford Raleigh 

Yolonda Kysontey Garrett Fayetteville 

Suzanne Elizabeth Getz Charlotte 

Jennifer Gibbons Lumberton 

♦♦ Graham Alexander Goode Harare, Zumbabwe 

Jennifer Tobie Grieves Hopewell, NJ 

Michael Eric Guffie Decatur, GA 

* Mary Kristen Haddock Orlando, FL 

Jacqueline Anne Haidt Raleigh 

Shakira Ann Hand Winston-Salem 

*** Misty Leann Hankins Martinsville, VA 

* Margaret London Hardee Morehead City 

Russell Allen Harmon Winston-Salem 

Lerone Antionne Harper Columbus, GA 

* Heather Marie Healy Gaithersburg, MD 

Laura Beth Herold St Petersburg, FL 

Kathleen Megan Herrelko Beavercreek, OH 

Lakajai Wynette Hill Blounts Creek 

Melissa Ann Hoffinan Stevensville, MI 

S* Denise Marie lacona Woodbridge, VA 

Jonathan Scott Jackson Plymouth 

Kenneth Robert Johnson ML Holly, NJ 

* Harrison Nathan Jones IV Manteo 

Melanie Grenoris Keel Winston Salem 

Christopher Lee Knowles New Bern 

Michelle Marie Kroth Cary 

Zachary Lee Lentz Gastonia 

+ Donna Elizabeth Liberman Charlotte 

S** Emily Caroline Lietz Greensboro 

David Matthew Long Charlotte 

Melissa Susan LoPresti Poughkeepsie, NY 

Bradley Hodge Lowry Greensboro 

Jennifer Ann Mahlum Raleigh 

Jennifer Lea Mahoney Apex 

** Casey Jenna Mansfield Raleigh 

Mark Marochak Raleigh 

William David McFadyen III New Bern 

Heather Lynne McKinney Nashville 

Rafael David McLeod Waxhaw 

Reba Suzette Milboume Palm Bay, FL 

+Co-ina)or H Honors Program S Univasty Scholan Program 

•CumLaude ••MagnaCura Laude •••SummaCum Laude 

32 



Andrew Alexander Mills Charlotte 

Nicolle Andrea Morock Raleigh 

Regina Lea Morrow Kemersville 

Kimberly Ann Murphy Potomac, MD 

Albert Bruce Myles Fayetteville 

Erika Anne Neijstrom Greensboro 

Larry Donnell Nelson Boston, MA 

David Jeffrey Nock Charlotte 

Amanda Elizabeth Novak Cary 

James Wilbum Pack III Asheville 

+ Erica Joy Page Raleigh 

♦* Lori Elise Peek Wilson 

Scott Elwood Pentoney Sandwich, MA 

♦ Kobianne Pless Auburn, CA 

Elizabeth Bicknell Prince Williamston 

Carlos Jermaine Pruitt Anderson, SC 

+ Elizabeth Eva Reyes Raleigh 

Jennifer Kristen Rhodes Hendersonville 

Jennifer Dare Rickard Sanford 

Mary Lynn Rives Sanford 

Donald Bruce Roberts Hillsborough 

Retha Leeanne Ross Albermarle 

+♦*♦ Cole Lee Russing Boone 

Letitia Rene Scott Greenville 

Holly Elizabeth Scull Charlotte 

Geelea Ann Seaford Lexington 

Sherri Nicole Sherman Hendersonville 

♦ Caroline Anne Shields . Rochester, NY 

*♦ Natasha Helena Smalls Charlotte 

+ Scott Andrew Southerland Winston Salem 

Jeffrey Duval Stanley Tabor City 

Courtney Leigh Steen Toccoa, GA 

Marcie Lynn Stephenson Raleigh 

Wendy Loraine Stone Cary 

Karen Diana Stuart Gamer 

Brice Tyler Stumpf Raleigh 

♦ Shauna Louise Sutton Charlotte 

Susan Ann Taylor Charlotte 

Robert Earl Taylor III Charlotte 

Anna Carol Tedder King 

James Otis Terry Winston-Salem 

Dana Rebecca Trimble Anderson, SC 

♦* Astrid Verdegaal Raleigh 

Danny Ray Vinson II Raleigh 

♦ Thomas Anthony Vitanza Washingtonville, NY 

Kelsey Amanda Walters RaJeigh 

Ursula Maryanda Ware Hillsborough 

Brian Douglas Warren Newton Grove 

+ Amy Marie Whitworth Charlotte 

** James Steven Willard Durham 

♦ Tamara Wilson Winstead Raleigh 

Joel Frank Wright Cary 

tCo-maior H Honors Prograin S Unh ast> Sdiolan Propam 

'CumLaude **MjgiuCumLaudc ***SuiiiiiiaCum Laude 

33 



*** Erica Claire Yaeger Durham 

Deborah Ellen Young Denver 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

♦*♦ Kathryn Elizabeth Adams Raleigh 

Michael Ray Ball Raleigh 

+ George Lennon Benton, Jr Whiteville 

Adam Tobin Bible Raleigh 

Michael Lewis Biesecker Lexington 

Elizabeth Ann Bruning Greensboro 

Mark William Coley Raleigh 

Melissa Mills Daniels Clayton 

Sandra Elaine Dickerson Oxford 

* Tecca Lynn Dowdy Massillon, OH 

S* Jennifer Ann Erickson Apex 

Terence Christopher Flora Durham 

Rebecca Cline Frazer Goldsboro 

H*** Joel Marcus Gilbert Hudson 

Matthew Cole Giimore Raleigh 

Kelley Gayle Goodrich Gastonia 

S** Steven Thomas Hemdon Greensboro 

Kevin Ray Holmes Creedmoor 

James Christopher Hubbard Raleigh 

♦♦♦ Priscilla Speed Hunter St Petersburg, FL 

** Crystal Michelle Jones Wilmington 

H* David Robert Kristan Raleigh 

H* Jean Frances Lorscheider Raleigh 

Daniel Joseph Macchia Central Islip, NY 

Jennifer Diane Mazza Raleigh 

Jennifer Austin Minges Davidson 

Cynthia Lea Moore Franklinton 

* Christi Suzanne Murphy Charlotte 

S*** Amy Elizabeth Paul Wilson 

John Jackson Payne Raleigh 

Shirley Denise Richardson Fayetteville 

+*** Cole Lee Russing Boone 

Christopher Douglas Shaw Clinton 

+** Bobby-Joe Shepard Jacksonville 

H*** Carolyn Kyle Sims Raleigh 

Andrew Judson Smith Beaufort 

Jennifer Leslie Spatz Middleton, NJ 

H Stephen Lee Stager Raleigh 

Kurt Careton Sykes Oriskany Falls, NY 

H*** Maureen Deborah Tinnesz Raleigh 

Erica Tess Triplett Mocksville 

Denise Lynette Tyler Cary 

Anne-Marie Veronica Veliek Huntington, NY 

H Leah Jeanette Vesselov Morganton 

Tracy Lynn Weaver Raleigh 

William Brett Wetzell Gastonia 

Jenell Lynn Whitefield Greensboro 

+Co-major H Honors Program S Univosity Scholars Program 

'CumLaude • 'Magna Cum Laude •••SummaCum Laude 

34 



+ Amy Marie Whitworth Charlotte 

H Holly Nichole Wilson Roanoke Rapids 

Andrea Faye Woolard Raleigh 

Jolie Heather Wrenn Fuquay-Varina 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Deirdra Lynette demons Maiden 

Meredith Anne Meaders Cary 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

Mark Christian Augustson Avon 

* Amanda Jane Barbour Fayetteville 

Howard Lee Bell Manteo 

* David Wayne Brown Richmond, VA 

David Tron Buff Morganton 

Robert James Coleman Yorktown Heights, NY 

**♦ Colleen Anne Coyle Durham 

Christopher Chad Eller Gastonia 

H*** Megan Lynn Pauls . Washington, DC 

+ Mark Wesley Friedrich Raleigh 

Letoria Sharelle Gales Red Springs 

* Michelle Lynn Gardner Raleigh 

James Edward Gunter Sophia 

Jodey Rebecca Hathaway Greenville 

+ Caprice Kristel Henry Jacksonville 

Shannon Kirk Holden Charlotte 

Raymond Melvin Hucks, Jr Goldsboro 

* Jeffrey Duane Humphrey Burlington 

Benjamin Kirk Hutchins Raleigh 

Cory Mark Johnson Statesville 

Lawrence Travis Locklear Pembroke 

Jonathan Styers McRae Laurinburg 

Douglas Edward Mitchell Mt. Olive 

Anand Nalin Parikh Chapel Hill 

Brian Paul Ramoth Wayne, NJ 

* Amanda Jean Reed Knoxville, TN 

Kristin Ann Saddlemire Arlington, VT 

* Joseph Andrew Simmons Ocean City, NJ 

Steven Patrick Stachecki Durham 

Kirk Allen Stehman Coal Township, PA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HISTORY 

Christopher Grant Barnes Albemarle 

Charles Edward Bettini, Jr Greensboro 

Hayward Burrell Campbell II Rocky Mount 

* Robert Paul Murphy Deer Park, NY 



+Co-iiujor H Honon Program S Univosity Sdiolan PiDgram 

•Cum Laudc •♦MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laudc 

35 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

David Leach Baird III Raleigh 

Erick Sloane Batts Statsonsburg 

Melissa Ann Brim Greensboro 

Gary Wendell Bussey West Hempstead, NY 

S+'**'* Michael Thomas Capps . . Wilmington 

Troy Matthew Chamey Upper Marlboro, MD 

Karen Benita Chester Newport News, VA 

S+*'*'* Samantha Margaret Clark Cary 

Christopher Andrew Cox Edenton 

S+*'''* Andrew Michael Crocker Fayetteville 

S+*'* Pamela Beth Fordham Annapolis, MD 

+ Mark Wesley Friedrich Raleigh 

Emilia Gutkin Raleigh 

"•■• Jeanne Moore Hellman Apex 

+" Allison Suzanne Hertzler High Point 

Mark Gregory Jonas Bowie, MD 

*" Jason Clay Lail Conover 

David William Little Raleigh 

S+'*'* Joel Lee Madden Charlotte 

John David Millican Whiteville 

S+**t John Caviness O'Quiim Fuquay-Varina 

S+'* Chad William Rehder Raleigh 

Edward George Shipman Bahama 

H*"* Peter Joel Solet Durham 

*"• Heather Alicia Sparger Salisbury 

+*" Vann Franklin Stancil Kenly 

Robert Horace Stevenson Raleigh 

Glyn Curry Thomas Greensboro 

**•» Patricia Jane Watson Grifton 

+ Ericka Lynn Whitmire Kannapolis 

Mary Theresa Woods Raleigh 

**■• Melissa Amy Young Morrisville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Jonathan Andrew Beasley Winston-Salem 

+ Michael Robert Lemanski Durham 

Roderick T. Spearman Wilmington 

+**■• Patrick Cecil Winstead Winterville 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

Jonathan Bowling Bullock Charlotte 

Catherine Barbara Degiralamo Mendham, NJ 

+ Caprice Kristel Henry Jacksonville 

+■• Dwight Dean King Clinton 

+ Kelly Gene Williams Winston-Salem 



+Co-iiujor H Honon Program S University Scholars Program 

•Cum LiDilc ••MagnaCum Laude •••SummaCum Laudc 

36 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Stephen Terrell Arick Raleigh 

Lauren Michelle Cambra Worcester, MA 

William David Carter New Bern 

Scott Anthony Clark Kinston 

Thomas Michael Cripps Albany, NY 

Jeffrey Warner Curtis Raleigh 

Thomas Paul De Witt Cary 

Cassandra Joivette Duncan Fletcher 

Ashley Anne Farrell Wilmington 

Thomas Winslow Flowers Old Fort 

Jennifer Kristi Forgy Morganton 

Jackie Lynn Gallion Gamer 

Dorothy Louann Gay-Lord Greenville 

♦ Melissa Katherine Green Roanoke, VA 

♦ Christopher John Hains Clayton 

Michael David Hart Raleigh 

Shannon Ashley Hedrick Raleigh 

Michael Jason Houser Vale 

**♦ Kathryn Lee Hunter Dobson 

Phyllis Chantana Jasper Valdosta, GA 

Tanya Jones Virginia Beach, VA 

Natasha Toinette Koonce Grifton 

Lashonda Denise Lanier Snow Hill 

Tammy Dennis Little Williamston 

Constance Millette Lucas Rocky Mount 

Natalie Beth Menius Salisbury 

Leon Jagdeo Mohan Stamford, CT 

Alan Douglas Moore Rocky Mount 

♦ Erik Christian Ness Charlotte 

Ashley Elizabeth Overton Rocky Mount 

+ Erica Joy Page Raleigh 

Scott David Parrillo Spring Lake Heights, NJ 

** Laura Llewellyn Pence Fairfax, VA 

+ Scott Hamilton Phillips Halifax 

♦ Lycia Ross Phipps Portsmouth, VA 

McClellan Bond Plihcik Greensboro 

** Rebecca Ann Plummer Clifton, VA 

William Misenheimer Polk Harrisburg 

Mills Travis Pruden Roxobel 

Charles Bret Rice Clemmons 

♦♦ Shannon Linelle Riley Wilson 

Raul Rizzo Chicago, IL 

Michelle Elizabeth Rothengast Raleigh 

*♦ Rodney Stephen Saunders Spring Hope 

Barton Howard Shoulars Raleigh 

Christopher Allan Simmons Fayetteville 

♦♦ Stacie Marie Snively Erie, PA 

Erin Alanna Stanton Morrisville 

Takishia Yvette Sutton Goldsboro 



+Co-inajor H HononPrograin S Uni%£rsil> Sdiolan Program 

•CumLaude ••MagnaCum Laude •••SummaCum Laude 

37 



Keely Leigh Taylor Morehead City 

Walter Davis Tenney Raleigh 

Theresa Lynn Turner Greensboro 

Pritesh Arvind Vakani Wilmington 

Antoinette Walker Fayetteville 

+* Angela Letitia Williams Rocky Mount 

Felicia Amice Williams Rocky Mount 

+ Kelly Gene Williams Winston-Salem 

April Louise Wiltshire Kemersville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ES POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Cris Andrew Kania Fayetteville 

Beth Nancy Moll Alexandria, VA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

+ George Lennon Benton, Jr Whiteville 

+** Bobby-Joe Shepard Jacksonville 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

Mark Augustus Adams Raleigh 

Aaron Nathan Bailey Jacksonville 

Richard Michael Bestafka Raleigh 

Erin Marie Byrne Hemdon, VA 

John Michael Carroll Gamer 

Karen Allene Deloach Raleigh 

Richard Louis Denton Zebulon 

Vemetta Yvette DeVane Winston-Salem 

♦* Richard Eugene Dunn Goldsboro 

Tracy Lynn Entwisle Tampa, FL 

Robin Renee Fore Raleigh 

Kimberly Sheree Gatling Philadelphia, PA 

+♦♦* William Arthur George Nags Head 

Amber Lynne Hallman Winston-Salem 

Emily Rae Heesch Hickory 

** Cynthia Ann Holland Four Oaks 

Carmela Dawn Jackson Lewisburg, WV 

Adam Paul Jaeger New York, NY 

Susan Lyn Kiger Rocky Mount 

Kristen Leigh Kodak Penfield, NY 

Crystal Lea Lane Wilmington 

Walter Teddy Largent, Jr Morganton 

**♦ Paulette Hotte Martin Raleigh 

* Amy Elizabeth Novello Pittsboro 

Kimberly Christina Petralia Hemdon, VA 

** Trinh Dang-Thuy Pham Charlotte 

Glik Rahlan Raleigh 

Jason Robert Shearin Raleigh 

Jonathan Lee Shoaf Midway 

Lisa Foster Smith Spring Hope 

+Co-niajor H Honors Program S University Scholars Program 

'CumLaude ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laudc 

38 



Michael Gregory Stellar San Jose, CA 

Lembe Gertrude Dende Tayilo Irving, TX 

Charles Adam Tucker Clinton 

Douglas Deendris Tyson Durham 

Clifton Tyron White Goldsboro 

+♦ Angela Letitia Williams Rocky Mount 

♦* Kathryn Anne Williams Kirkby Lonsdale, England 

Krystal Gayle Wortham Fuquay-Varina 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Keri Michelle Beauchaine Raleigh 

+ Leah Christine Fleischhauer Rhinebeck, NY 

H* Angela Ann Fulton Holland, OH 

Leon Samuel Grimes, Jr Dublin 

+ Elizabeth Eva Reyes Raleigh 

H+*** Catherine Michelle Rose Reidsville 

Julio Adam Santana Fayetteville 

+ Cynthia Darlene Storck Moyock 

Daniel A. Tisdel Denver, CO 

Audwin Underwood Charlotte 

+ Jodi Vedelli Harrisonburg, VA 

BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK 

Brookie Elizabeth Alexander Raleigh 

Lea Meadows Baker Statesville 

♦♦ Stephanie Ellen Best Cary 

Stephanie Lynne Boone Franklin, VA 

Alice Jane Burruss Ocracoke 

Tracy Angel Carter Tueson, AZ 

Tonya Markette Faison Durham 

Tracee Dionne Gregory Oxford 

Daphne Charese Hardin Winston-Salem 

Elizabeth Ann Holmes Stamford, CT 

Charisse Marie Hopkins Point Pleasant, NJ 

**♦ Angela Barbour Ksor Burlington 

* John Austin Lauve Morehead City 

Melissa Coleman McPherson Willow Springs 

Dana Carol Melton Advance 

Janie Powell Miles Raleigh 

* Leslie Gibbs O'Hara Wilson 

♦* Leigh Grace Osterlund Vienna, VA 

Tammy Annette Streater Durham 

* Angela Marie Tomlin Whittier 

Heather Renee Wilkinson Union City, TN 

*♦* Teresa Ellen Valliere Raleigh 



<Co-inajor H Honors Prograin S l/nivenil> Sdiolan Program 

*CuiiiLaude "MagnaCum Laude ***SuniinaCum Laude 

39 



College of Management 




BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ACCOUNTING 

* Susan Nicole Benfield Washington 

Ellis Craven Brewer Warsaw 

* Tina Michelle Carpenter Asheville 

Sean Michael Donaldson Salisbury 

Toni Anne Duncan-Seivers Wake Forest 

Karen Nicole Dupuy d'Angeac Lillington 

Kimberly Danielle Gilliam Pamlico County 

Lisa Ann Hawthorne Lansdale, PA 

Christa Marie Hopkins Bear Creek 

Randy Earl Jones Tarboro 

Kory Keishawn Kale Middlesex 

* Kenneth Franklin Lancaster Raleigh 

* Wendy Bunn Latta Zebulon 

*** Melissa Ann Mau Alamonte Springs, FL 

Jermaine Douglass McKinley Hickory 

Donna Tyler Moses Detroit MI 

Amy Denise Murphy Wilson 

Geoffrey Allan Powell Kill Devil Hills 

Alex Russell Ravenscraft Chicago IL 

Andre Demeur Robinson Rowland 

Linh Brian Schladweiler Rocky Mount 

Paul Franklin Sipe Hickory 

James Troy Walker Apex 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING 

James Ray Allison Kemersville 

*** Frederick Rom Ange, Jr Raleigh 

Kimberly Dawn Ansell Nags Head 

S** Christine Ann Bauer Charlotte 

** Julia Reynolds Beyer Fayetteville 

♦* Stephanie Walker Cain Cullman, AL 

Susan Laine Cannady Henderson 

Tobey Jaimes Carpenter Raleigh 

** Michele Yee-Yu Chao Raleigh 

Tamera Lee Combs Langdon, ND 

* Matthew Leathe Crane Conway, AR 

♦♦ Christopher Darin Crepps Pittsboro 

Tara Lynne Cromes Greensboro 

Nathan Joel Derrick, Jr Wake Forest 

♦♦* Maria Idalina De Sousa Gardner MA 

Michael Lawrence Fekete Bethlehem 

Robert Thomas Fitts Zebulon 

Charles Blair Foster Gastonia 

Joseph Ned Godwin, Jr Raleigh 



+Co-niaior H Honors Piogiani S Univereity Scholars Program 

*CuinLaude * 'Magna Cum Laude •••SummaCum Laude 

40 



Cicely Andrea Hart Winston-Salem 

**♦ Nancy Lynn Heyward Thibodaux, LA 

♦* Charles Daniel Hite Gastonia 

Barry Johnson Hodges Dobson 

Teresa Marie Jarman Jacksonville 

♦♦ Robin Sue Kearney Goldsboro 

Pamela Tonita Kelly Raeford 

*♦ Shannon Snow Langdon Winston-Salem 

* Timothy John LaSpaluto Cary 

♦* Ronald Wendell Lee, Jr Four Oaks 

♦** Lianne Lowell Raleigh 

*** Tagrid Maher Bennington, VT 

Amy Michelle Marler East Bend 

* Melanie Dianne McDougall Apex 

James Chad McLamb Benson 

* Amy Elizabeth Mills Cary 

Cristina Elizabeth Mobley Charlotte 

Amber Nicole Nassef Goldsboro 

+♦♦ Amaris Edmee Pena San Juan, Puerto Rico 

Donna Turner Pemell Maiden 

Jon Patrick Rygelski Richmond, IN 

Graham Paul Schillmoller Wilmington 

Laura Lynn Sizemore Englewood, CO 

Debra Jean Smith Raleigh 

* Elaine Roth Staedeli Cary 

David Brian Stroud Mt Holly 

Ashraf Munif Treish Raleigh 

Marion Harold Waters, Jr Mebane 

John Edward Wilks Richmond, VA 

Raymond Charles Zalusky III Wilson 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Brandon Edward Bingham Cherryville 

Seth Harrison Bingham Cary 

David Michael Bowling Raleigh 

♦♦♦ Kristen Nicole Broadway Wake Forest 

Charles Meade Clodfelter III Raleigh 

+* Michael Richard Cress Cary 

*♦ Michael Vincent DiPilato Charlotte 

Todd Michael English Raleigh 

Yvette Michelle Gamer Gamer 

Kenneth Wayne Godfrey Charlotte 

William Wayne Grayson Shelby 

Krista Lusk Guerriero Raleigh 

Charles Michael Hall, Jr Lexington 

Colby Lee Hall Raleigh 

Barbara Lou Harris Cary 

Matthew Hamilton Hawes Charlotte 

Jeremy Alan Johnson Selma 

* Monty Shea Johnson North Wilkesboro 

William Allen Kallam Charlotte 



♦Co-m^or H Honors Program S Uiuvarity Scholars Program 

'CumLaide * 'Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude 

41 



Matthew Roberts Kam Raleigh 

Joshua Landis Kelly Charlotte 

Russell Pate Linville Winston-Salem 

Fred Dennis Lockhart, Jr Raleigh 

Arthur Quinn Long, Jr Murphy 

Curtis Dion Marshall Omaha, NE 

Tanya Annette McCarty Raleigh 

Michael Harvey McMillan Rocky Mount 

John Preston McPhaul Sanford 

Paul Andrew Metivier Caiy 

Michael Christopher Miller , East Hanover, NJ 

Kristin Lynn Redd Edgewater, MD 

Charles Anderson Rose, Jr Mt. Holly 

+* Marcos Eduardo Ruiz-Avila San Salvador, El Salvador 

Michael Eric Schmitt Springfield, VA 

John Carter Skinner, Jr Raleigh 

Jeffrey Warren Smith Charlotte 

Haywood Earl Spruiil, Jr Greenville 

Marc Granville Stevens Charlotte 

+ Cynthia Darlene Storck Moycock 

James Beauford Trotter III Denton 

+ Jodi Vedelli Harrisonburg, VA 

Steven Wayne Yates Durham 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS IVL\NAGEMENT 

Mark Adam Acitelli Charlotte 

Mark Alan Agnor Raleigh 

Adrian Alston Norlina 

Maxwell Joseph Anthony Charlotte 

* Melissa Anne Ashbaugh Springfield, VA 

Kristen Geneva Ashley Whiteville 

* Bradley Drew Baker Chapel Hill 

Jeffrey Burke Bamett High Point 

Tobi Wray Baynor Washington 

** Stephen Wayne Bowman Hendersonville 

Stephen Christopher Brinkley Morganton 

* Matthew Thomas Brinkman Durham 

James Jacob Brooks Monroe 

Heather Lyn Burbank Gibsonviile 

Kevin Patrick Castle Durham 

Stacie Brooke Clark Lenoir 

Nikii Rena Cloninger Marion 

Garrick Michael Cole Asheville 

Christopher James Cook Panama City, Panama 

Kelly Rene Grumpier Raleigh 

Sherry Diane Deal Conover 

Fatima Omega Dockery Washington, DC 

Jennifer Renae Doweil Newton 

James Michael Dunn Cary 

Chad Thomas East Hickory 

Mark Thomas Faulkner Thomasville 



+Co-inajor H Honors Prograin S Univenity Sdiolan Program 

•CumLaudc ••MagnaCum Laude •••SummaCum Laudc 

42 



Wendi Lee Foote Asheville 

* Elefteria Rebeka Futris Winston Salem 

* Amaud Gadaix Raleigh 

Charles Leonard Griffin Jacksonville 

* Scott Alan Gugenheim Charlotte 

Nathan Roger Hamilton Fayetteville 

Stanley Edwards Hannen Durham 

Thomas Sanders Herb West Bloomfield, MI 

Cynthia Diane Hemdon Apex 

* Thurston Mayne Hill Clemmons 

William Chad Homer Hurdle Mills 

John Edward Imburgia Plymouth Meeting, PA 

* Mary Elizabeth Jamison Cary 

Tracy Ralph Jones Morganton 

Jason Hopkins Kimble Raleigh 

Anthony Paul Konig Greensboro 

Todd Arthur Larson Charlotte 

David Victor Lee Greensboro 

Jason Marcus Lucas Greensboro 

James Christopher Lyons Annapolis, MD 

* Ashley Kaye Markham Greensboro 

Laura Suzanne Mashbum Carthage 

Chris Girard Medve Kingston, NY 

Randall Alan Miller Charlotte 

Frank Anthony Mistero Lawrence, NY 

♦♦* Sinead Kathleen O'Neal Sylva 

Karen Lynn Paffen Greensboro 

+♦♦ Amaris Edmee Pena San Juan, Puerto Rico 

♦♦ Alison Renee Perkins Wilson 

Stephanie Lynn Price Hickory 

Carey Olivia Pugh Greensboro 

Geoffrey Stoddard Richards Charlotte 

*** George Anthony Robertson Raleigh 

Mark Galeano Rummell Raleigh 

* Leigh Anne Saunders Lexington 

Ryan James Shaughnessy Raleigh 

Holly Christine Smith Salisbury, MD 

Nathan Lee Stamey Concord 

Mary Beth Stauffer Winston Salem 

Allison Claire Summerlin Wilmington 

Aaron Matthew Swart Mooresville 

♦♦ Ann Parady Thomas Raleigh 

Gary Richard Tobin Winston-Salem 

Samuel Tumer, Jr Richmond, VA 

Kevin Scott Vroome Charlotte 

Steven James Wahlbrink Raleigh 

Gregory Steven Walters Hickory 

Allison Bowman Waniata Morehead City 

Lauren Leigh Wilkinson Raleigh 

Barbara Lyn Williams Charlotte 

Jimmy Helmy Zaki Raleigh 

Karl Frederick Zellman Raleigh 

+Co-in^or H Honors Program S Unn enin Scholars Program 

'CumUudc **MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laude 

43 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

* William Robert Barefoot Dunn 

S Jonathan Craig Blackwell Matthews 

Michael Kent Bradbury Greensboro 

+* Michael Richard Cress Cary 

Stephen Patrick Dolan Boston, MA 

Jason David Ferguson Hampstead 

** William Ernst Floyd Winston-Salem 

Tracey Young Franklin Long Beach 

Heydar Rafig Gasumov Baku, Azerbaijan 

Lock Shane Ireland Jacksonville, FL 

Travis James Janovich Sanford 

+ Leonard Albert Marcacci Winston-Salem 

Eugene Gregory Nolen New Bern 

+♦ Marcos Eduardo Ruiz-Avila San Salvador, El Salvador 

+ Scott Anrew Southerland Winston-Salem 

Thomas Dwight Tichenor Pinehurst 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ECONOMICS 

S+*** Samantha Margaret Clark Cary 

Samuel Preston Douglas III Wilson 

*** Donna Diane Floyd Corinth, MS 

Scott Vincent Hartis Charlotte 

Travis Shane Jackson , Hendersonville 

* Michael Dominic Lauricella Hagerstown, MD 

Derek Thomas Leite Raleigh 

Scott Thomas Nichols Gastonia 

*** Yijiang Joanna Shi Raleigh 



College of Physical 

and Mathematical Sciences 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

*** Todd Douglas Fuller Charlotte 

Coleen Ann Tworkowski Andover, CT 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 

Amy Sue Acanfora Laurinburg 

* Jason Lee Baker Raleigh 

Susan Julaine Branch Ayden 



*** 



+Co-inajor H Honon Program S Univeraty Sdiolan Program 

•CumLaude • 'Magna Cum Laude •••SummaCum Laude 

44 



♦** Jason Patrick Burton Conover 

SH+** Erin Christine Caine Raleigh 

+*♦ Trisha Myers Castranio Raleigh 

+♦* Alison Jane Cobb Arden 

+ Christopher Ray Delozier Charlotte 

Azeiia Carolnet Edwards Snow Hill 

** Russell Brian Furr Wilmington 

+♦*♦ Jayne Keifer Goodman Chicago, IL 

Diane Blake Harper Kinston 

S*** Courtney Lynne High Bailey 

+ Dwight Dale Hill, Jr Smithfield 

* Jessica Brooke Hillard Plymounth 

+ Kevin Matthew Holtman Halifax, VA 

+* Charles David Hunter Winston-Salem 

Ayse Karca Durham 

*** Roger Jagdish Narayan Raleigh 

+ Emily Lesesne Nelson Columbia, SC 

** Alan Frank Parlipiano Slidell, LA 

+ Monte Wayne Powell, Jr Clarendon 

S+*** Christina Lea Thomas Rockingham 

Brian Keith Tolley Smithfield, VA 

+ Karen Elizabeth Twiford Rocky Mount 

+ Gary Scott Weaver Fayetteville 

+*♦ Michelle Dee-Leigh Wilkerson Jacksonville 

Alicia Heather Wilson Raleigh 

Kimberley Ann Yongue Reidsville 

Lawrence Wonsik Yoon Toronto, Ontario 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Bernard Alvan Barrameda Fayetteville 

Andrew Kiskadden Boal Raleigh 

** Christina Lynn Cole Charlotte 

Kimberly Anne Ford Mebane 

H* Jonas Charles Gunter Canton 

Angela Dawn Hall Burlington 

Reginald Howard Farmville 

H*** John Robert Kitchin Whittier 

Juan Pablo Mack Raleigh 

H Robert Timothy Mathers Willow Spring 

Maulik Dhanesh Mehta Charlotte 

SH*** Craig Michael Micallef Kitty Hawk 

Mark Gregory Myers Raleigh 

Guy Jeffrey Newcomb Southern Pines 

Kristi Diahann Perdue Charlotte 

Jennifer Ann Smith Raleigh 

Patrick Hubert Walker Burgaw 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

Michael Ryan Blagg Albemarle 



+Co-inajor H Hooon Program S Universit\' Scholan Program 

*CumL3udc **MagnaCum Laude ***SummaCum Laude 

45 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY 

Robert Clark Gresham, Jr Charlotte 

Srinivas Krishnasami Cary 

James Albert Skinner, Jr Winston-Salem 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS 

♦ Aimee Elaine Bickers Winston Salem 

Timothy Alan Blanchard Davenport, lA 

+♦*♦ Kerry Eleanore Buckley Raleigh 

Damon Christopher Butler Clinton, MD 

SH+*** Mary Patricia Campbell Raleigh 

Brian Michael Derwart Baltimore, MD 

SH+*** Derek Brent Efird Chapel Hill 

Hubert Ray Hardy, Jr Morganton 

+** Andrew Graydon Hatch Raleigh 

Monica Regina Hobbs Goldsboro 

SH+*** Jason Donald Home Richlands 

S** Mark Robert Howe Gastonia 

Benjamin Wayne Jones Winston Salem 

+ Reginald Bryan Jones Marion 

Man Sik Joo Fairfax, VA 

Daniel Earl Kendall Asheville 

H** Sandra Louise Kraushaar Fayetteville 

+*** Thomas Aaron Ledford Bakersville 

Shelley Page Mull Morganton 

SH+** Amber Lee Radachovsky Fayetteville 

S+*** Catherine Michelle Rose . Reidsville 

Douglas Kim Shamlin Cary 

SH+*** Matthew John Smith Goldsboro 

Susan Dawn Stone Coats 

Donna Kimberley Talbert Southern Pines 

Jennifer Leigh Taylor Wilmington 

Laurie Anne Vick Nashville 

Stephanie Williams Kinston 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN METEOROLOGY 

Anthony Philip Armstrong Charlotte 

Sharon Natalie Baker Sanford 

*♦♦ Christian Winford Barnes Salisbury 

S** George Matthews Bridgers Conway 

Timothy Adam Corley Richmond, VA 

Mary Elizabeth Duhan Angola, NY 

Martha Elizabeth Durr Jefferson 

*♦♦ Darrell Bryan Ensley Harrisburg 

Jason Martin Graves Burlington 

William Christopher Hock Greer, SC 

* Lara Elizabeth Joyce Mooresville 

Jeremy Mark McCollum Asheville 

Carl Ray Morgan II Greensboro 

+Co-niajor H Honotj Program S Unhosity Scholars Program 

•CumLaude ••MagnaCum Laude •••SummaCum Laude 

46 



William Richard Mosley, Jr Wilson 

Douglas Glenn Schneider Sanford 

* James Arnold Thurman Kinston 

* John Thomas Walker Madison, MS 

*** James Christopher Weaver Norfolk, VA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL RESOURCES 

Michael Todd Becker Saint Pauls 

David Ross Brock Winston-Salem 

* Christopher Lee Hamblet Raleigh 

John Valentine Lazar, Jr Henderson 

Lisa Kay Masco Lake Hauasu City, AZ 

Eric Wayne Schupbach Charlotte 

Stephen Lynn Southerland Chinquapin 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICS 

Sean Francis Boylan Longbranch, NJ 

Jeffrey David Brown Lincolnton 

SH+*** Mary Patricia Campbell Raleigh 

Nathan Scott Ciliberto Sanford 

SH*** Tonya Shea Coffey Lenoir 

SH*** William Seth Hartley Winston-Salem 

+** Andrew Graydon Hatch Raleigh 

H* Justin Alexander Lancaster Raleigh 

Kevin Dean Richardson Rocky Mount 

SH*** Vincent Timothy Woods Rockville, MD 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN STATISTICS 

* Robert Peter Agnelli Winston-Salem 

David Paul Biggs Beckley, WV 

Leslie Gail Brown Lillington 

Tracy Lynn Card Wake Forest 

Craig David DeVault Kingsport, TN 

*** Carol Lynn Smith Dukes Wake Forest 

** Diane Crossman Hall Raleigh 

* Lynda Smith Harrison Raleigh 

Meisha Elizabeth Key Greensboro 

H*** Tara Lynn Knowles Autryville 

Erik Fred Koenig Houston, TX 

Steven Kent Munger Cary 

Warren Christopher Smith Winston-Salem 

Sarah Robertson Wright Davidson 



+Co-iiMgor H Honors Progran S Unnergi) Sdiobn Progiani 

'CumLaudc ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SununaCum Laudc 

47 



College of Textiles 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Textiles and the College of Engineering. 

Robert Arnold Baker Clayton 

Stacey Lynne Bolen Washington 

* Brad Alan Dickinson Charlotte 

♦** Jaren Jacob Edwards Stanley 

LeeAnn Fish Yadkinville 

* Sarah Louise Green Zebulon 

**♦ Steven Craig Hamrick Shelby 

Mark Gregory Hofberg Burlington 

Walter Jason Johnson Greensboro 

* Anh-Kiet Dang Pham Hickory 

* Claudia Rebecca Rose Shelby 

Donnie Lee Shackelford High Point 

Monroe Keith Spillman, Jr Salisbury 

Jeffrey Steven Thomas Gastonia 

Cynthia Marie Watta Raleigh 

Loyd Chadwick Whitmire Conover 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE AND APPAREL MANAGEMENT 

Brian Scott Baity North Wilkesboro 

* Christopher Todd Basinger Wilson 

Joseph Eddie Batten Sanford 

Howard Ray Blackburn, Jr Concord 

James Wesley Bolton Oxford 

Timothy Shawn Bowen Rutherfordton 

Raymond Lamar Bradley IV Gastonia 

Kristen Anne Cannon Charlotte 

*♦ Carley Simone Cano San Salvador, El Salador 

Jennifer Michelle Chambers Greensboro 

David Phillip Childress Lumberton 

William Jay Davis Raleigh 

Adam David Dunefsky Huntington Station, NY 

Jon Christian Ennis Mooresville 

Andrew Swain Faucette Mebane 

Wendy Dawn Foster Yadkinville 

Elizabeth Alice Frey Flemington, NJ 

Ginger Marie Grantham Hickory 

* Mendy Elizabeth Grantham Mount Olive 

David Michael Harrison, Jr Henderson 

** Julie Renee Hayes Rual Hall 

Heather Anne Henderson Highland, NY 

*** Marc Roger Hess Gent, Belgium 

James Lewis Huene, Jr Hickory 



+Co-iiia)or H Honors Program S University Scholars Program 

•Cum Laude ••MagnaCum Laudc •••SummaCum Laude 

48 



Angle Dawn James Statesville 

Richard Rankin Jarman Gastonia 

David Cleveland Luckett Burgaw 

Heather Elizabeth Mackinstry Lexington 

Charles Daniel Madson Easton, PA 

Rebecca Whitney Marks Mt. Holly 

* Kenneth Reid Marsh High Point 

Bryan Zachary Matheny Statesville 

Bradley Mark McLawhom Fayetteville 

William Clifton Mitchiner, Jr Roxboro 

Troy Douglas Neil Hendersonville 

Keith William Ogden Roanoke Rapids 

Edie Renn Parish Aberdeen 

Emily Caroline Paul Aurora 

** Gregory Lee Powell Eliicott City, MD 

Charles Dickinson Reed Charlotte 

Andrew James Robillard Winston-Salem 

Anthony Ray Sherrill Hickory 

Kristy Paige Smith High Point 

Spencer Andrew Smith Mayodan 

John Emerson Snyder Greensboro 

+ Jennifer Roxanne Spry Greensboro 

Joseph Bradley Stevens Gamer 

Paul Cameron Stroup Brevard 

John Alan Stuppnig Charlotte 

Winona Kay Thompson Graham 

Jonathan Stanley Tickle Winston-Salem 

James Kevin Tiddy Gastonia 

Cori Ellen Tubbs Raleigh 

** Michelle Leigh Uren , Shelby 

Dieter Horst Wagner Cramerton 

John William Wall III Greensboro 

+ Ericka Lynn Whitmire Kannapolis 

♦** Holly Lynn Williams Maggie Valley 

Joseph Aaron Windley III Raleigh 

* Cameron McNairy Wyrick Greensboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

David Wesley Carlson Charlotte 

Suzanne Marie Galioto Cary 

John Michael Gembicki, Jr Concord 

Chad Hughes Henry Raleigh 

Andrea Rene Howington Cameron 

Neil Kevin Kauer Raleigh 

* Christopher Shane Leonard Lexington 

** Judson Tate Merritt III New Bern 

Vincent Andrews Monfalcone III Wilmington 

+♦ Robert Baxter Powell Raleigh 

Jessie Parrish Ramsey III Greensboro 

** Amanda Kay Hitter Robbins 

Brian Ray Sechrest Southmont 

+Co-inaior H Honors Prognni S Uiuv'enit>' Sdiobn Prograni 

*CuniLaude **MagjiaCuin Laude ***SuniiiiaCuni Laude 

49 



Monty Glenn Terrell Raleigh 

♦♦ Jonathan Michael Thomas Gamer 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE MATERLVLS SCIENCE 

Susan Ellen Bennett Raleigh 

Jason McCrae Boyd Gastonia 

Gregory Scott Campbell Maiden 

James Archibald Campbell III Charlotte 

Shawn Gregory Dunning Winston-Salem 

William Henderson Everitt Yanceyville 

Bryan Ronald Lisk Charlotte 

Jay Min ' Charlotte 

Franklin Thomas Moutos Winston-Salem 

Ryan Ballard Munn Charlotte 

Paul Christopher Plante Scotch Plains, NJ 

♦ Andrew Kelsey Smith Gastonia 

Cory Paul Wilson Salisbury 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE SCIENCE 

Thang Due Nguyen Fayetteville 

William Keith Russell Oakboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY 

Sherin Abdel Mogazi Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILES 

Heather Elaine Barbour . Hope Mills 

James David Brock Norwood 

Jodi Lynn Brookshire Saluda 

* Steven Andrew Carmichael Roanoke Rapids 

Kerry Kaylene Cody Hickory 

Kristi Rose James High Point 

Amy Melissa Leonhardt Raleigh 

Carma Dunyell Lynn Cary 

Patricia Ann Miller Laurinburg 

Kristie Liane Reid High Point 

Allison Lorraine Richards Raleigh 

+ Jennifer Roxanne Spry Greensboro 

Christopher David Thomas Polkton 

Sheryl Delores Tyndall Goldsboro 

Shawn David Ward Bethlehem 



+Co-niajor H Honors Program S Univcnity Scholars Prognun 

'CuniLaude "MagnaCum Laude •••SummaCuin Laude 

50 




GRADUATE DEGREES 



Master's Degrees 



MASTER OF ACCOUNTING 

Nadia Munawar AH Karachi, Pakistan 

James Everidge Banner Mt. Airy 

Kevin Don Bartholomew Milan, TN 

Jennifer Marie Burbank Gary 

Charles Hubert Cole, Jr Ocala, FL 

James Ellis Colotta Indianola, MS 

David Scott Compton Durham 

Mary Alicia Currin Oxford 

Brian Andrew Davis Newton 

Pamela Pearson Dodge Raleigh 

Wendy Torbitt Duncan Prattsburg, NY 

James Walter Ennis Smithfield 

Deborah Coltrain Fabian Wilson 

Margaretha Kathleen Freiburger Charlotte 

Marianne Elizabeth Gill Middletown, NJ 

Stephen Bradley Glenn Rockingham 

Leslie Suzanne Hager Conover 

Deryle Keith Hammonds Kannapolis 

Kimberly Marie Hansen Houston, TX 

Frances M. Hem Holmdel, NJ 

Brian Edward Jesinkey Simpsonville, SC 

Penny Jones Kaffenberger Burlington 

Robin Michelle Koonce Fayetteville 

Suzan Rayfield Maddox Buies Creek 

Robin Collins Mangum Dunn 

William Melvin Martin, Jr Roanoke, VA 

Sandra Ann Marie Massengili Benson 

Dianna Renee Mulik Raleigh 

Sharon Litteken Northcutt Palmyra, MO 

Michael Henry Owenby Sevierville, TN 

William Edwin Palmer Cheyney, PA 

Edith Gayle Finer Sneads Ferry 

Samuel Keith Pleasant Roxboro 

Andre Romondo Plemmer Tarboro 

Meri-Frances Rega Clemmons 

Jennifer Leigh Seal Prospect Hill 

Bradley Troy Shive Salisbury 

Stanley Tyler Treece Asheville 

Thurman Robert Ward III Pinehurst 

Cheryl Ann Bjomson Yanik Humboldt, lA 



+Co-major 5 1 



MASTER OF AGRICULTURE 

Thomas Eli Harvey Canton 

Clifford Dean Ruth Hendersonville 

William Edward Vasser Raleigh 

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE 

Ronald Jeffrey Agresta Steubenville, OH 

Amy Charlene Allen Bear Creek 

Jonathan Lucien Biron Savannah, GA 

Jonathan Martin Carr Raleigh 

Anna Katherine Dyer Charlotte 

Joseph Karl Folger Webster, NY 

Jason Sutherland Gable Columbus, OH 

Enzo Marfella Rocky Hill, CT 

Charles Eric Trunnell Southport 

MASTER OF CHEMISTRY 

Dalia Girgis Mikhael Raleigh 

MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Terry Lee Albrecht Raleigh 

Steven Michael Click . Cookeville 

Edward Monroe Curtis III Beaumont, TX 

Ufiik Dilek Ismir, Turkey 

John Stanley Wakelam Fargher III , Raleigh 

Richard Wayne Fedora Mechanicsburg, PA 

Alan Rhett Fussell Wilmington 

Steven Glenn Haynie Cary 

Yu-Tsang Li Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic Of China 

Scott Allen Miles Raleigh 

James Clayton Neill Hickory 

Keith Mack Roberts Elizabethtown 

MASTER OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Burton Floyd Beers, Jr Raleigh 

Kyle Lynn Croutwater Raleigh 

Martin Skippy Dulberg Raleigh 

Philip Dickson Hren Durham 

Laura Lynne Kold Mooresville 

Ann Blair Janak Dallas, TX 

Karen Purer McKenzie Cary 

Stephen Robert Morris Raleigh 

Bradford Wayne Mott Harrells 

Tai Woo Nam Apex 

Ernest Caleb Pasour III Raleigh 

Daniel Paul Sharpe Richlands 

Suxu Sun Raleigh 

Honglei Tu Nanjing, People's Republic Of China 

52 +Co-major 



James Joseph Yuill Raleigh 

Zhaofeng Zhu Suzhou, People's Republic Of China 

MASTER OF ECONOMICS 

Magda Adriani Jakarta, Indonesia 

Gleg Petrovich Lekhtman Simferopol, Ukraine 

Scott Bradley Maher Gary 

Nikolai Vadimovich Maslov Moscow, Russia 

Michael John Paska Rochester, MN 

MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Adult And Community College Education 

Angela Rene Ballentine Henderson 

Manjusri Basu , Calcutta, India 

Susan Jill Gibson-MacNeela Hillsborough 

Lisa Joy Hughet Raleigh 

Monica Terrell Leach Pittsboro 

Carey Matthews McMains Apex 

Laurie Holmes Mettam-Rude St. Mary's City, MD 

Theresa Leigh Sellers O'Driscoll Raleigh 

Counselor Education 

Cindy Evans Haeck Raleigh 

Jill McAllister Hartley Grosse He, MI 

Pinchas Mordechai Herman Pittsburgh, PA 

Elizabeth Douglas Morse Wilson 

Suzanne Locke Norfleet Cary 

John Carl Panepinto Cary 

Katherine Marie Wiles Indianapolis, IN 

Curriculum And Instruction 

Joyce Boykin Gardner Wendell 

Tracey Collette P. Greggs Birmingham, AL 

Edith Allison Hodges Raleigh 

Catherine Wallwork Home Raleigh 

Megan McLaurin Poole Apex 

Kelly Sasser Smith Princeton 

Educational Administration And Supervision 

Janet Martin Allen Oxford 

Stephen Paul Alspaugh Delaware, OH 

Barbara Satterwhite Bums Raleigh 

+ Daniel Bonaparte Cliffe IV Burgaw 

Dan John Greaven Wesley Hills, NY 

Charlotte Nash Hughes Raleigh 

David Scott Schwenker Raleigh 

Stacey Futch Weddle Lafayette, LA 



+Co-major 53 



Higher Education Administration 

Crystal Lynn Bragg Berea, OH 

Carrie Frederick McLean Warsaw 

Mathematics Education 

Jacquelyn Ann Banks Cary 

Kelly Ann Cochrane Matthews 

Brian Robert DeLap Canton, OH 

Kathy Griffin Atlanta, GA 

Ashley Ann Richardson High Point 

Wendy Kathleen Stocum Whitney Point, NY 

Occupational Education 

William Lester Terrill, Jr Menomonie, WI 

Science Education 

Annette Elaine Railey Wentzville, MO 

Katherine Claire Richter Raleigh 

Justyn Fleming Spencer Henderson 

Special Education 

Linda Kay Abrams Mckeesport, PA 

Michelle Christman Albert Chamblee, GA 

Margaret McElroy Allen Raleigh 

Karyn Egan Brelloch Cary 

Sudakshina Ghosh . Calcutta, India 

Marshall Jackson Wilson 

Sharon O'Dell Learning Raleigh 

Patricia Zboinski McCabe Sayville, NY 

Heather Marie Meehan Chapel Hill 

Billie Jeanne Satterwhite Thomas Raleigh 

Lisa Gray Vick Wilson 

Jacqueline Wheeland Elmira, NY 

Jessica Dawn White Clayton 

Technology Education 

+ Daniel Bonaparte Cliffe IV Burgaw 

David Patrick Walker Durham 

Training And Development 

Lesley Holland Downey Durham 



MASTER OF ENGINEERING 

Frank Hay Alexander Winterville 

54 +Co-major 



Donald Wayne Bissette Wilmington 

Paul James Brentnell Greensboro 

Kirk Patton Bumgamer Wilmington 

Kathleen Connolly Flanagan Haveiock 

John Francis Gogan, Jr West Seneca, NY 

Richard Douglas Grady, Jr Goldsboro 

Paul Andrew Guley III Burlington 

Clifton Thomas Jones Durham 

David Alan Koukol Fayetteville 

Ruth Ellen Mormino Lanni Lenoir 

Robert Joe Pollock Durham 

Michael Andrew Sutton Cary 

David Yanik Asheville 

MASTER OF FORESTRY 

Barry Dean New Raleigh 

MASTER OF GRAPHIC DESIGN 

Hsing-Wen Chang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic Of China 

Elizabeth Crawford Throop Atlanta, GA 

MASTER OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

Donald Charles Corey Aiken, SC 

Leslie Ray Frye Raleigh 

Yookyung Ha Seoul, South Korea 

Margaret Anne Jacobi Wilmington 

Sherri Michelle Koester Dallas, TX 

Valerie Anne McGaughey Raleigh 

Jennifer Anne McMillan Chapel Hill 

Anne Elizabeth Shaw Concord 

Tania Nina Sosiak Raleigh 

Krishnan G. Srirangam Chicago, IL 

Daniel McMichael Stipe Easton, PA 

MASTER OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Mark Edward Fitzpatrick Charlotte 

Alp Erkan Omur Istanbul, Turkey 

MASTER OF INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 

Leonard Shawn Dockery High Point 

Pedro Resto Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 

Patrick Gordon Schmiedel Raleigh 

Craig Visser South Portland, ME 

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Alicia Louise Berry Raleigh 

Matthew Bernard Dube New Bedford, MA 



+Co-major 55 



Joseph Paul Godfrey Cary 

Susan Elizabeth Kiesel Milford, CT 

Jeffrey Essex Kleaveland Spokane, WA 

Yvonne Gorman Maher Raleigh 

William Anthony McGee Germanton 

Alisandra Dolores Mora Madrid, Spain 

Patrick Graham Pleasants Goldsboro 

Anne Louise Valentine Carrboro 

MASTER OF LIFE SCIENCES 

Mark Fletcher Austin Hickory 

Alison Jameen Baldwin Fairmount, IN 

MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Bradley Scott Carter Columbus 

Alexander Grishin Raleigh 

Jason Warren Williamson Anderson 

MASTER OF OPERATIONS RESEARCH 

William Terry Fulkerson Webster, NY 

Jennifer Letitia Jancik Buffalo, MN 

MASTER OF PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

John Patrick Clougherty Raleigh 

Conchita Maria Greene Lillington 

Bridget LuOuida Height Charlotte 

Alberto Luis Roman Mt. Holly 

Junko Yumoto Takarazuka City, Hyogo, Japan 

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

George Simpson Ake, Jr Raleigh 

Nola Marie Allan Gamer 

Mary Kathryn Deaton Raleigh 

Anna Young Evans Bailey 

Douglas Jerome Hewett Shallotte 

Gregg Edward Jarvies Hillsborough 

Rendell Lamont Jones Charles City, VA 

Shannon Lee Lasater Burlington 

Michael Ralph Longmire Raleigh 

Ngoc Boi Thi Nguyen Greensboro 

Gail Jean Paddock Raleigh 

Alitha Gail Palich Louisburg 

Clarence Mark Poole Raleigh 

Sandra McHugh Shanahan Cary 

Steven Elliott Smith Apex 



56 +Co-inajor 



MASTER OF STATISTICS 

Michael John Mandac Arichea Manila, Philippines 

Erin Elyse Blankenship Washington, MI 

James Daniel Dockery Harrisburg, PA 

Mi-jeom Joe Pusan, Korea 

Bridget Gillian Mahoney Poughkeepsie, NY 

Stephanie Brumfield Monks Fort Gibson, OK 

Ronald Wayne Patten, Jr Matthews 

Carol Joy Simpson Springfield, PA 

Eric Stuart Yow North Wilkesboro 

Wenlian Yu Nanjing, People's Republic Of China 

MASTER OF TECHNOLOGY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

Laura Warren Lauffer Fayetteville 

Donna Ree Rainbow Raleigh 

Thomas Scott Sorrill Liberty, IL 

MASTER OF TEXTILES 

Antonio M. V. Francisco New Bedford, MA 

Jerry Michael King Staley 

Marcia Ellen Quinlan Mansfield, MA 

MASTER OF WILDLIFE BIOLOGY 

Selena Birgit Bauer Humansville, MO 

MASTER OF ARTS DEGREES 

English 

Ryan Marcus Barbour Willow Springs 

Felecia Eileen Carr- Young Raleigh 

Philip Alan Collins Burlington 

Clare Jacobs Dannenberg Gamer 

Richard Foster Harris IV Charlotte 

Cason Lynley Rent Helms Charlotte 

Edith Ferree Jeffreys Raleigh 

Jennifer Leigh Kiziah Hudson 

Michael Garrity Malouf Newton, MA 

Daphne Olivia McLawhom Grifton 

Jason Paul Miller Raleigh 

Christopher Alan Perrius Park Ridge, NJ 

Patricia Ann Shore State Road 



History 



Kathryn Wates Crockett Manassas, VA 

Jonathan Edward Fair Reading, PA 



+Co-major 57 



Liberal Studies 

William Holmes Bumette Raleigh 

Nancy Carole Doherty Raleigh 

James Oscar Duncan, Jr Silver Spring, MD 

Landon Wood Fauber Lynchburg, VA 

Steven Harold Gillikin Beaufort 

Christie Knittel Mabry Raleigh 

Carolyn Carriker Noriega Chapel Hill 

Lynn Rosamond Norris Raleigh 

Joyce Evans Rodham Raleigh 

Political Science 

Mason Russell Harris Southern Pines 

Public History 

Catherine Welbom Brown Kemersville 

Beth Lauren Calamia Durham 

Steven Greg Chudnick Highland Park 

Jennifer Pustz Kulikowski Raleigh 

Yvette Marie Stillwell Winter Springs 

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES 

Adult And Community College Education 

Vickie Harrington Hall Taylorsville 

Shea Ann Henson Atlanta, GA 

Wei Ning Shenyang, People's Republic Of China 

Joyce Dale Trumbo Odom Harrisonburg, VA 

Barbara Jean Pairitz Grand Rapids, MI 

Aerospace Engineering 

Michael Howard Duncan EUenboro 

Michael Dean Neaves Lansing 

Agricultural And Extension Education 

Linda Kay Becton Harlowe 

Animal Science 

Sabrina Leigh Tuttle High Point 

Applied Mathematics 

Rhett Davis Guthrie Santa Anna, TX 



58 +Co-inajor 



Biochemistry 

Stephanie Lorraine Pollard Foster Miami, FL 

Botany 

Marguerite Melissa Brake Battieboro 

Chemical Engineering 

Joseph Albert Miller, Jr New Carrollton, MD 

Stephanie Tolstedt Read Columbus, OH 

Santosh Srinivas Upadhya Bombay, India 

Chemistry 

Debra Jeanne Driscoll Gillette, NJ 

Civil Engineering 

Pankaj Agarwal Calcutta, India 

Brenda Ann Bonner Cookeville, TN 

Shannon Carol Caldwell Asheboro 

Navaneet Dutt Guwahati, Assam, India 

Danial Grant Fisher Dover, NH 

Russell Todd Goin Panama City, FL 

Scott Matthew Ney Cape Elizabeth, ME 

Kimberly Whitsel Sackett Buda, TX 

Timothy Nathaniel Smith Raleigh 

Kasey Dawn Trimble Washington, WV 

Matthew Joseph Zenker Springfield, VA 

Computer Engineering 

Shahrooz Salehi Alavi Tehran, Iran 

Hayrettin Buyuktepe Istanbul, Turkey 

Vikas Chandra Raleigh 

Stephen Christopher DeMarco Clinton 

Drew Patrick Gugliotta Raleigh 

Perrin Jay Hirshman East Brunswick, NJ 

Matthew David Jennings Rochester, MN 

Michael Edward Murphy Durham 

Alexander Gist Phelps Chapel Hill 

John Perumalsamy Pushraraj Madras, India 

Dharmaraja Sivaramakr Rajan Raleigh 

Bryan Cole Staats Ravenswood, WV 

Jason Matthew Sullivan Raleigh 

Venkata R. M. Surapaneni .^ . Chapel Hill 

Han Zhu Cary 



+Co-major 59 



Computer Science 



Antoine Larmanjat Airvault, France 

Muralidhar Narasimha Raleigh 

Crop Science 

Andrea Josefina Cardinal Buenos Aires, Argentina 

Alfred Stanley Culpepper Woodland 

Katherine Mary Jennings Apex 

Cassandra Edgar Webster Mentor, OH 

Anthony David White Payson, IL 

Ecology 

Keith Richard Markland Columbia, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Timothy Alan Brenneman Raleigh 

Alan Dennis Cannon Schaumberg, IL 

Mark Cameron Cassada Clemmons 

Colleen Patricia Crowley Edison, NJ 

Bruce Eliot Duewer Oakton, VA 

Matthew Holt Frantz Greensboro 

Matthew Burdet Harris Greenville 

Richard Mark LeGrand Edmond, OK 

Xiaofeng Lu Shanghai, People's Republic Of China 

Marcel Arrobio Lumaban Cary 

Stephen John Mann Durham 

Todd Frederick Miller Cincinatti, OH 

Lixin Nie Hefei, People's Republic Of China 

Melita Danyel Parker Clinton 

Shetal Natwarbhai Patel Apex 

Dhirendra Kumar Pathak Dallas, TX 

Nabil Hussein Rabbani Saidu, Lebanon 

William Edward Rader III Cary 

Barbara Ann Scarlette Greensboro 

Eric Arvidson Staton Raleigh 

Hemant Chandrakant Sura Raleigh 

Sherril Ann Taylor Raleigh 

Stephen Kent Taylor Durham 

Stephen Robert Taylor Thomasville 

Jason Tennant Teeter Raleigh 

Hon Ngoc Tran Raleigh 

Eric Matthew Vogel Charleroi, PA 

Lori Paull Wynkoop Grand Junction, CO 

Entomology 

Edward Douglas Karoly Pickerington, OH 



60 +Co-major 



Food Science 



Ellen Margaret Ciplinski Newington, CT 

Kay Lynn McNeill College Station, TX 

Meliati Simon Medan, Indonesia 

Ragip Una] Adana, Turkey 

Forestry 

Robert Patrick Crook Litchfield, CT 

Jennifer Leigh Jennings Cary 

Mary-Margaret Sykes McKinney Wilson 

Gregory Felix Rayo Meyer Kigali, Rwanda 

Cheryl Case Stewart Kenneth City, FL 

Higher Education Administration 

Jason Sloan Boyd Erie, PA 

Horticultural Science 

Patrick John McGuigan South Euclid, OH 

John Njoroge Njenga Lari Division, Kenya 

Robert Joseph Rouse Charlestown, RI 

Hunter LaMar Stubbs Gastonia 

Industrial Engineering 

+ Leigh Ann Clarke Brain Raleigh 

Sharon Melissa Bennett Joines Raleigh 

Daniel Paul Kelaher New Providence, NJ 

+ Christopher John Petra Franklin, KY 

Steven Alexander Reynolds Knoxville, TN 

+ Andrew Zozom, Jr Raleigh 

Management 

Sonali Agrawal Raleigh 

Robert Christian Brantley Raleigh 

Jacqueline Nina Brown Raleigh 

Jeffrey Jude Bulger Cary 

Amy Elizabeth Crossley Cincinnati, OH 

Laurie Newkirk Dunston Raleigh 

Steven Atwood Edwards Pittsboro 

Randall Scott Eichelberger King Of Prussia, PA 

Chung-Ren Fang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic Of China 

Helene Aline Flament Campagne Les Wardrecques, France 

Owe Lennart Forsberg Stockholm, Sweden 

Stefan Forster Munich, Germany 

Jason Mathieu Fryar Raleigh 

James Lester Hager, Jr Cary 

Donald Hale, Jr Raleigh 

Stephen Thomas Hamborg Des Moines, lA 

+Co-major 5 1 



Todd Robert Hargnett Raleigh 

Richard Lee Ingle Winston-Salem 

Christopher Jones Raleigh 

Brian Richard Kelly Brooklawn, NJ 

William Denes Kovacs Raleigh 

David Lee Kurtz, Jr Raleigh 

Jie Ma Leshan, People's Republic Of China 

Courtney LaTanya Mack Raleigh 

Steven Francis May Call, Colombia 

William Patrick McCrorie Floral Park, NY 

Dirrek Deon Moore Raleigh 

Michael David Nelson Apex 

Kimberiy Mitchell Neptune Selma 

David Cameron Parker, Jr Montgomery, AL 

Robert John Pekoske Kenosha, WI 

John Charles Rinehart Dunkirk, MD 

John Irvin Ring Dobson 

Amy Teresa Ruggiero Raleigh 

Keith David Sabol Cary 

Zakhia Serhani Roubaix, France 

Renuka Kocherlakota Singh Pune, India 

Jun Song Beijing, People's Republic Of China 

Brent Eugene Taylor Glen Alpine 

Susan Elizabeth Taylor Raleigh 

Robert Scott VanKirk Chambersberg, PA 

Sripriya Vijayasekaran Madras, India 

Kenneth Lee Wood Nashville, TN 

Marine, Earth And Atmospheric Sciences 

Craig Brooks Lane Raleigh 

Glenn Shubert Shell, Jr Claremont 

Fredrick Stratton de Pollok Sedalia, CO 

Guwei Zhu Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People's Republic Of China 

Materials Science And Engineering 

Kevin Lloyd Beaman Raleigh 

Konrad Fredrich Jarausch Chapel Hill 

Russell Warren Patterson Tallassee, AL 

Robert Joseph Ratway Ann Arbor, MI 

Keith Wayne Sharp Arkadelphia, AR 



Mathematics 



Robert Nelson Hunt Raleigh 

Hiroshi Ishikawa Yonezawa, Japan 

Maria Tourkodimitri Raleigh 



Mechanical Engineering 



Cory Allen Cataldo Chesapeake, VA 

Adam Brian Chmielewski Salisbury 



62 +Co-major 



Paul Joseph Cromer Raleigh 

William Arthur Harris Jr Durham 

Samit Ashok Khedekar Bombay, India 

Danielle Spinicci Labrozzi China Grove 

Quan Ma Beijing, People's Republic Of China 

James Paul McKay Raleigh 

Vittorio Carlo Orsini Jr High Point 

Kazushige Yano Kumamoto, Japan 



Nuclear Engineering 

Richard Lonnie Altstatt Tullahoma, TN 

Savvas Victor Morris Thessaloniki, Greece 

Operations Research 

+ Leigh Ann Clarke BrainRaleigh 

+ Christopher John Petra Franklin, KY 

+ Andrew Zozom, Jr Raleigh 

Parks, Recreation And Tourism Management 

Kelly Dean Baithlow St. Albans, WV 

Michael John Branigan Delhi, NY 

David Randall Dannenberg Lilbum, GA 

David Christopher Holder Wingate 

Physiology 

Christopher Douglas Hepler High Point 

Plant Pathology 

Lisa Marie Ferguson Raleigh 

Joseph Edward Flaherty Fayetteville 

Dawn Elizabeth Eraser Edinburgh, Scotland 

Una Jean Harrison Asheville 

Herman Duardo Hidalgo Heredia, Costa Rica 

Scott Louis Walker Raleigh 



Psychology 



Mary Taylor Hartman Raleigh 

Karen Ann McGee Raleigh 

Heather Lee Osborne Morehead City 



Rural Sociology 



Michelle Renee Beck-Warden Raleigh 

Diane Coucouias Calleson Durham 

Katherine Ann Hyde Raleigh 



+Co-inajor 63 



Technical Communication 

Javier Edward Berkhoff Raleigh 

Christina Biliouris Fayetteville 

John Lee Bumgamer Raleigh 

Cindy Karen Haga Winston-Salem 

Joseph Laurence LaCroce Raleigh 

Michelle Corbins Nichols Raleigh 

Leesa Kaye Clark Payne Burlington 

Deborah Gay Walker Roxboro 

Stephanie Edwards Waters Cary 

Technology Education 

Craig Thomas Barber Durham 

Textile Chemistry 

Corduia Christina Guerth Ochsenfurt, Germany 

Nilesh Harinarayan Rathi Pune, India 

Textile Engineering 

James Christopher Love Statesville 

Benjamin Robert Martin Winston-Salem 

Textiles 

Henderic Whilhelm Martin Aamink Charlotte 

Ned Thaxton Beck Charlotte 

Howard Andrew Hardee New Hill 

Gregory Joseph Loughry Raleigh 

Fangning Sun Weifang, People's Republic Of China 

Mia Dawn Swann Ellenboro 

Training And Development 

Rinnette Minor Godwin Raleigh 

Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Anita Ann Colbert Rock Hill, SC 

Wood And Paper Science 

Douglas Frank Falls Franklin, VA 

Timothy George Smith Clayton 



Zoology 



Susan Mary Campbell Raleigh 

Janet Lee Dow Kinston 

Lori Ann Frear Grahamsville, NY 



64 +Co-major 



Michael Joseph Guzy Silex, MO 

Leopoldo Miranda Rio Piedras, PR 

Todd Clifford Wenzel . , West Allis, WI 

Steven Gregory Williams Fuquay-Varina 



DOCTOR OF EDUCATION DEGREES 



Candy Lee Metz Beal, Curriculum And Instruction 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Case Study on the Use of ReadingAVriting Workshop to Teach English Language Arts 

to At-risk Adolescents. (Under the direction of John F. Arnold.) 

Anne Eleanor Doster, Adult And Community College Education 

Lancaster, South Carolina 

Dissertation: A Qualitative Study of Adaptation to Job Loss of Managerial Males at Mid-life. (Under 

the direction of Barbara M. Kirby.) 

Pamela Tipton Hilbert, Adult And Community College Education 

Harrisonburg, Virginia 

Dissertation: Student Perceptions of Difficulties to Participation in the Focused Industrial Training 

Programs of a North Carolina Community College. (Under the direction of Rosemary Gillett-Karam.) 

Joseph Milton Hodges, Sr., Adult And Community College Education 

Wallace, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Governor's Commission on Education beyond the High School The Carlyle 

Commission 1961-1963. (Under the direction of J. Conrad Glass, Jr.. and Scipio A. J. Colin III.) 

Cynthia Summeriin Jones, Adult And Community College Education 

Greenville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Factors Associated with Women Students' Curriculum Choice in North Carolina 

Community Colleges. (Under the direction of Ronald W. Shearon.) 

Elizabeth Plyler Myers Lee, Educational Administration And Supervision 

Rich Square, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Sensitivity of Criterion-referenced Test Reliability to the Position of the Cutoff 

Score. (Under the direction of Raymond G. Taylor, Jr..) 

Cathy Marie Lowery, Adult And Community College Education 

Pembroke, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Leadership Behaviors and Job Performance of County Extension Directors in the North 

Carolina Cooperative Extension Service. (Under the direction of Ronald W. Shearon.) 

Ruth Pwiti Mufandaedza, Adult And Community College Education 

Mutare, Zimbabwe 

Dissertation: Psychosocial Factors That Influence College Students' Knowledge and Use of Condoms 

for HFV Prevention in Mutare, Zimbabwe. (Under the direction of Nancy E. Hagan and Edgar I. 

Famier.) 



65 



Howard Stephen Paris, Adult And Community College Education 

Warsaw, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Perceptions of Academic Deans in the North Carolina Community College System 

Regarding Current and Future Application of Total Quality Management (TQM) Principles in an 

Academic Setting. (Under the direction of Edgar I. Farmer.) 

Lucille Cook Roth, Adult And Community College Education 

Beaufort, South Carolina 

Dissertation: The Relationship Between Student Ratings and Faculty Responses in a Community 

College Setting. (Under the direction of George A. Baker III.) 

Kathryn Baker Smith, Adult And Community College Education 

Jamestown, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Role of the North Carolina Community College System in the Economic 

Development of the State's Communities. (Under the direction of Edgar J. Boone.) 

Sarah Wallace Somerville, Adult And Community College Education 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Dissertation: An Examination of EEO-6 and IPEDS Reports to Determine the Status of Women and 

Minorities in Leadership Positions of Two-year Public Institutions of Higher Education in the United 

States. (Under the direction of Rosemary Gillett-Karam and George A. Baker III.) 

Sharon Scarborough Waters, Adult And Community College Education 

Tarboro, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Participation Patterns of Older Students in the North Carolina Community College 

System and Reasons Given for Their Participation. (Under the direction of J. Conrad Glass, Jr..) 

LaVeme Robinson Weldon, Curriculum And Instruction 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Making Connections: Exploring the Effects of a Culturally Relevant Curriculum on 

Writing for Low-achieving Eighth-grade African-American Students. (Under the direction of John 

F. Arnold.) 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREES 



Nitin Kumar Agarwal, Operations Research 

Indore, India 

Dissertation: Percentile Goal as a Performance Criterion in a Multiclass GI/G/1 Queueing System. 

(Under the direction of loannis Viniotis.) 

Robert Emerson Allison, Jr.., Textile Technology Management 

Cleveland, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Design and Utilization of the Textile and Apparel Business Information System 

(TABIS): A Data Warehouse for Econometric and Demographic Textile- and Apparel-related Data. 

(Under the direction of Trevor J. Little and Moon Won Suh.) 



66 



Christopher Arcona, Mechanical Engineering 

Burke, Virginia 

Dissertation: Tool Force, Chip Formation and Surface Finish in Diamond Turning. (Under the 

direction of Thomas A. Dow and John A. Bailey.) 

Manpreet Singh Arora, Fiber And Polymer Science 

New Delhi, India 

Dissertation: Modeling and Control of the Dyeing of Nylon by Dye and Chemical Metering. (Under 

the direction of Ralph McGregor.) 

Anita Rae Bahe, Forestry 

Aurora, Nebraska 

Dissertation: Science and Policy: The Biological, Environmental and Policy Implications of Organic 

Waste Reutilization in Urban Landscape Management (Under the direction of Ellis B. Cowling.) 

Barbara Ann Bailey, Biomathematics 

University Park, Maryland 

Dissertation: Asymptotics and Applications of Lx>cal Lyapunov Exponents. (Under the direction of 

Stephen P. Ellner and Douglas W. Nychka.) 

Cathleen Flake Barrows, Statistics 

Cary, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Effect of Measurement Error on Two-sample Tests. (Under the direction of 

Leonard A. Stefanski.) 

Robert Davey Belding, Horticultural Science 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Epicuticular Wax of Apple and Its Relationship to Sooty Blotch Incidence and Captan 

Retention. (Under the direction of Eric Young and Sylvia M. Blankenship.) 

Samir Mohamed Benmakhlouf, Textile Technology Management 

Fez, Morocco 

Dissertation: Adaptive Loom Control for Yam Defects. (Under the direction of Mansour H. M 

Mohamed and Perry L. Grady.) 

Carson Lee Bennett II, Physics 

South Boston, Virginia 

Dissertation: Steady-state Simulations of Parallel and Oblique Collisionless Shocks. (Under the 

direction of Donald C. Ellison.) 

Bonita Louise Blake, Toxicology 

Chadboum, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Flavin-containing Monooxygenases: Occurrence in Brain and Role in the Hepatic 

Microsomal Metabolism of a Phenothiazine Antipsychotic. (Under the direction of Ernest Hodgson.) 

Karim Samy Mina Boutros, Electrical Engineering 

Alexandria, Egypt 

Dissertation: Low Temperature Vapor Phase Epitaxy of III-V Compounds for Optoelectronic 

Devices. (Under the direction of Salah M. Bedair.) 



67 



Gavin Richard Cato, Computer Engineering 

Seminole, Florida 

Dissertation: Partitioning and Scheduling DSP Algorithms for Parallel Execution Using the Order 

Graph Method. (Under the direction of Winser E. Alexander and Douglas S. Reeves.) 

Harpreet Singh Chadha, Civil Engineering 

New Delhi, India 

Dissertation: Formal Specification and Verification of Concurrent Systems. (Under the direction of 

John W. Baugh, Jr..) 

Richard Allen Chassey, Counselor Education 

Louisburg, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Relationship of Moral Judgement, Dysfiinctional Cognitive Attitudes and 

Perception of the Residence Hall Social Environment to Residence Hall Student Disciplinary Status. 

(Under the direction of Lawrence K. Jones.) 

Xuzhou Chen, Applied Mathematics 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Matrix Iterative Analysis. (Under the direction of Robert E. Hartwig.) 

Kwanho Choi, Mechanical Engineering 

Taejon, South Korea 

Dissertation: Composite Laminated Shells under Transverse End Load. (Under the direction of James 

C. Mulligan.) 

Joseph Jerome Clone, Marine, Earth And Atmospheric Sciences 

Baldwin, New York 

Dissertation: The Impact of Gulf Stream-induced Diabatic Forcing on Coastal Mid-Atlantic Surface 

Cyclogenesis. (Under the direction of Sethu Raman.) 

Polly Kathleen Dinsmore, Food Science 

Dallas, Texas 

Dissertation: Genetic and Mutational Studies of the abiA Phage Resistance Gene in Lactococcus 

lactis and Identification of a Phage Genomic Region Involved in Sensitivity to AbiA. (Under the 

direction of Todd R.KIaenhammer.) 

Holly Joyce Dunham, Microbiology 

Elm City, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Role of Lactobacillus reuteri in Controlling Avian Growth Depression (AGD). 

(Under the direction of Walter J. Dobrogosz.) 

Don Jayantha Ediriwickrema, Forestry 

Tangalle, Sri Lanka 

Dissertation: Modeling and Analysis of AVHRR Data for Biogenic Emission Inventory System 

(BEIS). (Under the direction of Siamak Khorram.) 

Yusef Fahmy, Materials Science And Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Modification of the Mechanical Behavior in A15 Intermetallic Compounds by 

Structural Changes Induced by Interstitial Alloying. (Under the direction of Carl C. Koch.) 



68 



Mitra Fiuzat, Microbiology 

Abadan, Iran 

Dissertation: Study o{ Lactobacillus reuteri in vitro, in situ and in the Gastrointestinal Tract of CD-I 

Mice. (Under the direction of Walter J. Dobrogosz.) 

Darren Louis Frechette, Economics 

Bristol, Connecticut 

Dissertation: Three Essays Concerning Commodity Storage under Rational Expectations. (Under the 

direction of Walter N. Thurman.) 

Debra Lynn Frederick, Genetics 

Shreveport, Louisiana 

Dissertation: The Regulation of Protein Phosphatase Type I in the Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 

(Under the direction of Kelly G. Tatchell and William R. Atchley.) 

Miressa Duffera Garoma, Soil Science 

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 

Dissertation: Biogeochemistry of Phosphorus in the Highland Plateau Soils of Ethiopia. (Under the 

direction of Wayne P. Robarge and T. Jot Smyth.) 

Zacharia George, Civil Engineering 

Kerala, India 

Dissertation: Development and Evaluation of Methods for Coupled Seismic Analysis of Piping 

Systems. (Under the direction of Ajaya K. Gupta.) 

Ashok Kumar Ghosh, Wood And Paper Science 

Lucknow, India 

Dissertation: The Role of Ozone in Multistage TCF Bleaching Processes. (Under the direction of 

Rudra P. Singh and Josef S. Gratzl.) 

Bertha Smith Gorham, Education Research And Policy Analysis 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Dissertation: Changing Schools for Children: An Evaluation of a Preschool Intervention Program 

for At-risk Children. (Under the direction of Robert C. Serow and Elizabeth MacPhail-Wilcox.) 

Geoffrey Ian Graham, Genetics 

St. Paul, Minnesota 

Dissertation: Mapping Quantitative Trail Loci Using Specialized Populations. (Under the direction 

of Charles W. Stuber.) 

Donna Marie Grant, Toxicology 

Easton, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: A Comparison of the Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of Two 

Benzoylphenylurea Pesticides, Diflubenzuron and Lufenuron in the Rat and Mouse. (Under the 

direction of Patricia E. Levi.) 

David Herring Hardy, Soil Science 

LaGrange, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Laboratory, Greenhouse and Field Studies on Atrazine Dissipation with Emphasis on 

Volatilization. (Under the direction of Jerome B. Weber.) 



69 



Robert Thomas Harger, Jr., Mathematics 

Eden, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Realization of Level Two Integrable Highest Weight Representations of the Affme Lie 

Algebra A,*^'. (Under the direction of Kailash C. Misra.) 

Debra Jean Grantham Holden, Psychology 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Impact of Perceived Risk on Low Income, Rural, Postmenopausal Women's 

Decisions to Get Mammograms. (Under the direction of Donald W. Drewes.) 

Jearmie Conrad Hollar, Mathematics Education 

Lenoir, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Effects of a Graphing Approach College Algebra Curriculum on Students' 

Understanding of the Function Concept. (Under the direction of Karen S. Norwood.) 

Xiaodong Huang, Mechanical Engineering 

Nanjing, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Development of Robotic Manipulator Learning Controls Using Artificial Neural 

Networks. (Under the direction of Gordon K. F. Lee and Leonhard E. Bemold.) 

Elaine Ann Cohen Hubal, Chemical Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Mathematical Modeling of Mass Transport of Inhaled Gases in the Upper Respiratory 

Tract. (Under the direction of Peter S. Fedkiw.) 

Mary Lynn Hudson, Aerospace Engineering 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Dissertation: Linear Stability of Hypersonic Flows in Thermal and Chemical Nonequilibrium. (Under 

the direction of Ndaona Chokani and Graham V. Candler.) 

Catherine Lee Jahncke, Physics 

Covington, Louisiana 

Dissertation: Near-field Optical Spectroscopy. (Under the direction Hans D. Hallen and Michael A. 

Paesler.) 

Matthew Tracy Johnson, Jr.., Entomology 

Dallas, Texas 

Dissertation: The Role of Natural Enemies in Ecology and Evolution of He liothis virescens on 

Transgenic Plants. (Under the direction of Fred L. Gould.) 

Elizabeth Bright Kegley, Nutrition 

Pulaski, Virginia 

Dissertation: Effect of Source and Level of Supplemental Chromium on the Performance, Glucose 

Metabolism and Immune Response of Cattle. (Under the direction of Jerry W. Spears.) 

Paresh Umakant Kenkare, Chemical Engineering 

Bombay, India 

Dissertation: Modeling of Phase Separation in Aqueous Two-phase Systems Containing Salts. (Under 

the direction of Carol K. Hall.) 



70 



Bahrain GhafTarzadeh Kermani, Electrical Engineering 

Tehran, Iran 

Dissertation: On Using Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms to Optimize Performance 

on an Electronic Nose. (Under the direction of H. Troy Nagle, Jr..) 

Richard Scott Kern, Materials Science And Engineering 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Silicon Carbide and Aluminum 

Nitride Thin Films Grown by Gas-source Molecular Beam Epitaxy. (Under the direction of Robert 

F. Davis.) 

Lester Hoe-Aun Khoo, Immunology 

Singapore 

Dissertation: Callinectin, an Antibacterial Peptide from Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun 

(1896), Hemocytes. (Under the direction of Edward J. Noga.) 

HongKey Kim, Mechanical Engineering 

Choong-nam, South Korea 

Dissertation: Analysis of Axisymmetrically Loaded Filament Wound Composite Cylindrical Shells. 

(Under the direction of Fuh-Gwo Yuan.) 

Peter Deane King, Zoology 

Armidale, Australia 

Dissertation: Aquatic Respiration of Freshwater Turtles. (Under the direction of Harold F. Heatwole.) 

Adrianna Grant Kirkman, Wood And Paper Science 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation : Feasibility and Economic Studies of Novel Technologies in the Pulp and Paper Industry 

through Process Simulation. (Under the direction of Josef S. Gratzl.) 

Scott Oliver Knowles, Toxicology 

St. Petersburg, Florida 

Dissertation: Lead Disrupts Lipid Metabolism in Human, Rodent and Avian Species: Consequences 

for Immune Function and Disease Resistance. (Under the direction of William E. Donaldson.) 

Pramod V. N. Koppol, Computer Science 

Hyderabad, India 

Dissertation: Incremental Analysis and Testing of Distributed Software Systems. (Under the 

direction of Kuo-Chung Tai.) 

Ja-Hum Ku, Physics 

Seoul, South Korea 

Dissertation: Properties of Si^Ge,., Alloy Surfaces and Co/Si^Ge,., Interfaces. (Under the direction 

of Robert J. Nemanich.) 

Andres Humberto La Rosa, Physics 

Huacho, Peru 

Dissertation: Time-resolved Near-field Imaging of Carrier Dynamics in Silicon. (Under the direction 

of Michael A. Paesler.) 



71 



David Wallace Laird, Plant Pathology 

Starkvilie, Mississippi 

Dissertation: Iron and Iron-Protein Relationships in Heterodera glycines-infected Soybean. (Under 

the direction of Kenneth R. Barker and Jeng-Sheng Huang.) 

Surachit Laksanasut, Economics 

Bangkok, Thailand 

Dissertation: Federal Reserve Policy Reaction Functions: An Empirical Investigation. (Under the 

direction of Douglas K. Pearce.) 

Ming Lei, Mechanical Engineering 

Jiajiang, Sichuan, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses and Optimal Design of Bifurcating Blood 

Vessels. (Under the direction of Clement Kleinstreuer.) 

Cheng-Ming Li, Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Mucin Biosynthesis: A. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bovine Mucin Core 2 

P6-N-Acetyl-glucosaminyltransferase cDNA; B. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies and 

Immunoassay of Guinea Pig Tracheal Mucins. (Under the direction of Kenneth B. Adler.) 

Xiang Lin, Nutrition 

Shenyang, Liaoning, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Bacterial Keratinase: Purification, Gene Structure and Cloning for Hyperexpression. 

(Under the direction of Jason C. H. Shih.) 

Helen Shulman Lupton-Smith, Counselor Education 

Johnson City, Tennessee 

Dissertation: The Effects of a Peer Mediation Training Program on High School and Elementary 

School Students. (Under the direction of Edwin R. Gerler, Jr..) 

Guoying Ma, Crop Science 

Jiangsu, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Differential Responses of Weed Species to Prosulfiiron. (Under the direction of Harold 

D. Coble and Frederick T. Corbin.) 

Wyatt Alexander Mangum, Genetics 

Richmond, Virginia 

Dissertation: Modeling the Population Biology and Population Genetic Dynamics of die Parasite 

Varroa jacobsoni Oudemans on Its Host, Apis mellifera L., with Nonlinear Difference Equations. 

(Under the direction of Trudy F. Mackay.) 

Vaidyanath Mani, Applied Mathematics 

Madras, India 

Dissertation: On Black Box Interpolation over Arbitrary Fields. (Under the direction of Robert E. 

Hartwig.) 

Pedro Manjarrez-Sandoval, Crop Science 

Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico 

Dissertation: Genetic Variance Among Inbred Lines and Fj Heterosis as Predicted by Coefficient of 

Parentage and RFLP-based Genetic Similarity Estimates in Soybean. (Under the direction of Thomas 

E. Carter, Jr..) 



72 



Lauren Michaela Mclntyre, Genetics 

New Brunswick, New Jersey 

Dissertation: DNA Fingerprinting and Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium: A Continuous Approach to the 

Analysis of VNTR Fragment Lengths. (Under the direction of Bruce S. Weir and Stephanie E. 

Curtis.) 

Jian Meng, Fiber And Polymer Science 

Jiangxi, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Study of Carding Dynamics. (Under the direction of Abdelfattah M. Seyam.) 

William Edward Milholen II, Aerospace Engineering 

Asheville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Computational Analysis of Semi-span Model Test Techniques. (Under the direction of 

Ndaona Chokani.) 

Jeffrey Scott Montgomery, Physics 

Hattiesburg, Mississippi 

Dissertation: Materials and Device Analysis of Hydrogen Plasma Prepared Silicon Surfaces. (Under 

the direction of Robert J. Nemanich.) 

Susan Elizabeth Moore, Forestry 

Rochester, New York 

Dissertation: Natural Regeneration of Adantic White Cedar in the Great Dismal Swamp. (Under the 

direction of Robert C. Kellison.) 

Ramesh Murthy, Forestry 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Effect of COj, Nutrients and Water on the Physiology of Loblolly Pine Trees, (Pinus 

taeda L.). (Under the direction of Phillip M. Dougherty and Howard L. Allen, Jr..) 

Meltem Asli Narter, Fiber And Polymer Science 

Izmir, Turkey 

Dissertation: Micromechanics of Three-dimensional Fiberweb Nonwovens: Constitutive Equations. 

(Under the direction of Subhash K. Batra and David R. Buchanan.) 

Wendy Levin Newby, Psychology 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Social Functioning Late Effects in Child and Adolescent Survivors of Cancer (Under 

the direction of Patricia F. Horan and Cathy L. Crossland.) 

Ines Josefina Pagan, Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic 

Dissertation: Actions of Interieukin-l and Prostaglandin Ej on Rabbit Ciliary Epithelial Cells. (Under 

the direction of Lloyd N. Fleisher and Arthur L. Aronson.) 

John Arvle Patten, Mechanical Engineering 

Kannapolis, North Carolina 

Dissertation : Molecular Dynamics Modelling and Analysis of the Precision Machining of Germanium 

Including the High Pressure Phase Transformation. (Under the direction of John S. Strenkowski and 

Paul H. DeHoflf.) 



73 



Mohan Dajirao Pawar, Fiber And Polymer Science 

MaJegaon, India 

Dissertation: Analyzing the Thermal Protective Performance of Single Layer Garment Materials in 

Bench Scale and Manikin Tests. (Under the direction of Roger L. Barker and Hechmi Hamouda.) 

Dai Hung Peters, Forestry 

Kokomo, Indiana 

Dissertation: Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Management: A Case Study of the 

Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. (Under the direction of Jan G. Laarman.) 

Lee Michael Prochaska, Crop Science 

San Antonio, Texas 

Dissertation: The Role of Glyphosate for Weed Management in Glyphosate Tolerant Cotton. (Under 

the direction of Harold D. Coble.) 

Narayan Bahadar Rajbhandari, Forestry 

Lalitpur, Nepal 

Dissertation: The Use of Level Spreaders to Enhance Effectiveness of Forested Filter Zones by 

Dispersion of Agricultural Runoff. (Under the direction of James D. Gregory.) 

Noah Nathan Ranells, Soil Science 

New York, New York 

Dissertation: Winter Annual Grass-Legume Bicultures for Efficient Nitrogen Management in No-till 

Com Production Systems. (Under the direction of Michael G. Wagger.) 

Victoria Lee Reardin, Psychology 

Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Predicting Leadership Behaviors from Personality as Measured by the Myers-Briggs 

Personality Indicator. (Under the direction of Samuel B. Pond III.) 

Jeffrey Andrew Royle, Statistics 

Manchester, Michigan 

Dissertation: Statistical Inference for Heterogeneous Random Fields. (Under the direction of Douglas 

W. Nychka.) 

Frank Harrison Ruggiero, Marine, Earth And Atmospheric Sciences 

Lyndhurst, New Jersey 

Dissertation: Short-term Forecasting with a Mesoscale Model Using Four-dimensional Data 

Assimilation of Asynoptic Data. (Under the direction of Rangarao V. Madala and Seth Raman.) 

Jeffrey Richard Ryan, Entomology 

Syracuse, New York 

Dissertation: Host-associated Genomic and Antigenic Variance in Diverse Strains of Borrelia 

burgdorferi, the Etiologic Agent of Lyme Disease. (Under the direction of Charles S. Apperson and 

Jay F. Levine.) 

James David Schuman, Food Science 

Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina 

Dissertation: Thermal and Biological Inactivation in Bacterial Pathogens in Liquid Egg. (Under the 

direction of Brian W. Sheldon.) 



74 



Liang Shi, Nuclear Engineering 

Beijing, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Nuclear Reactor Loose Part Impact Activity and Damage Mechanisms. (Under the 

direction of Charles W. Mayo and J. Michael Doster.) 

Steven John Smith, Microbiology 

Freeport, Illinois 

Dissertation: Physiological Influence of Sterol on Gene Regulation and Respiration in the Yeast, 

Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (Under the direction of Leo W. Parks.) 

Christopher Gordon Taylor, Genetics 

St. Charles, Missouri 

Dissertation: Characterization of a Tobacco Promoter and Its Applications in Creating 

Nematode-resistant Transgenic Plants. (Under the direction of Mark A. Conkling and Charles S. 

Levings III.) 

Carl Stephen Tennessee, Biological And Agricultural Engineering 

Ft. Walton Beach, Florida 

Dissertation: Development of a Flowing Plasma Reactor for Surface Biodecontamination. (Under 

the direction of Larry F. Stikeleather and Roger P. Rohrbach.) 

Stuart Marc Thomas, Chemical Engineering 

Marshfield, Wisconsin 

Dissertation: Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Nitrogen-substituted Aromatic 

Metabolism. (Under the direction of Steven W. Peretti and David F. Ollis.) 

Jiunn-Yann Tsai, Electrical Engineering 

Taichung, Taiwan, Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Drain Engineering for Deep Submicrometer MOSFET Devices. (Under the direction 

of Carlton M. Osbum.) 

Kuenhi Tsai, Biomathematics and Statistics 

Nan-tou, Taiwan, Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Survival Analysis for Telemetry Data in Animal Studies. (Under the direction of 

Kenneth H. Pollock and Cavell Brownie.) 

Setyo Dwi Utomo, Crop Science 

Bandar Lampung, Indonesia 

Dissertation: Evaluation ofFour Peanut /nv/7ro Culture Methods and a Model Transgene Expression 

System Based on Agrobacterium-mediated Transformation of Mature Leaves. (Under the direction 

of Thomas G. Isleib.) 

Mark Harold Van Horn, Electrical Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Three-dimensional Boundary Detection in Intracoronary Ultrasound Images. (Under 

the direction of Wesley E. Snyder.) 

Ken Van Vu, Computer Engineering 

Cary, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Blocking Probabilities in ATM Traffic Management (Under the direction of Ame A. 

J. Nilsson and Harry G. Perros.) 



75 



Charles Arthur Walker, Jr.., Horticultural Science 

Macon, Georgia 

Dissertation: The Cherokee Rose in the Southeastern United States: An Historical Perspective. 

(Under the direction of Dennis J. Werner and James C. Raulston.) 

Theodore Michael Webster, Crop Science 

Mentor, Ohio 

Dissertation: Purple Nutsedge {Cyperus rotundus) Population Dynamics and Interference in Com 

(Zea mays) and Cotton {Gossypium hirsutum). (Under the direction of Harold D. Coble.) 

Paul Steven Weinhold, Biological And Agricultural Engineering 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Dissertation: Nondestructive Vibrational Testing as a Means of Assessing the Directional Elastic 

Moduli of Vertebral Cancellous Bone of Ovariectomized Animals. (Under the direction of C. Frank 

Abrams, Jr.. and Simon C. Roe.) 

Jack Martin Weiss, Biomathematics 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Cubic Ternary Complex Model: A Heuristic for Classifying Equilibrium 

Pharmacological Models and for Understanding Efficacy and Apparent Affinity in These Models. 

(Under the direction of Stephen P. Ellner and Paul H. Morgan.) 

Kennedy Sirengo Wekesa, Zoology 

Nairobi, Kenya 

Dissertation: Organizational and Activational Effects of Androgens in a Reflex Ovulator, the Pine 

Vole {Microtus pinetorum). (Under the direction of John G. Vandenbergh.) 

Mark Gordon Wensell, Physics 

Darlington, Maryland 

Dissertation: Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Semiconductor Surfaces. (Under the 

direction of Jerzy Bemholc.) 

Nancy Mason White, Forestry 

Cary, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Spatial Analysis of Fecal Coliform Bacteria Fate and Transport (Under the direction 

of Hugh A. Devine.) 

Cheung (David) Wong, Computer Science 

Hong Kong 

Dissertation: Performance Enhancement Techniques and Methodologies for Highly Parallel 

Processing Systems in Scientific Computational Applications. (Under the direction of Edward W. 

Davis, Jr. and Robert E. Funderlic.) 

Joosung Yang, Immunology 

Seoul, South Korea 

Dissertation: Pathogenic Molecular Clone of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV): Characterization 

of die FIV- NCSUl Molecular Clone JSY3. (Under the direction of Wayne A. F. Tompkins.) 

Ahmet Yigit, Industrial Engineering 

Erzurum, Turkey 

Dissertation: A Cell Formation Methodology Based on Fuzzy Set Theory. (Under the direction of 

Jaime Trevino and Thorn J. Hodgson.) 



76 




Zili Zhang, Toxicology 

Shanghai, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Potential Mechanisms of Bis(2-choloroethyl) Sulfide-induced Cutaneous Vesication. 

(Under the direction of Nancy A. Monteiro-Riviere.) 

Xiaolong Zhang, Economics and Statistics 

Changchun, People's Republic Of China 

Dissertation: Integrating Resource Types, Access Conditions and Preference Differences into Models 

for Use and Nonuse Values: The Case of Marine Debris Control. (Under the direction of Thomas 

Johnson.) 



College of Veterinary Medicine 



DOCTOR OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Robert Scott Bakal Sunrise, FL 

Linda Balot Greenville 

Karen Bokeny Beck Raleigh 

Christina Mann Benjamin Raleigh 

Stephanie Jane Bower Spring City, PA 

Larissa Annett Bowman Somerset, PA 

Audra Jean Branum Mt. Holly 

Bradley Ritter Brown Jamestown 

Dawn Jennifer Bush Currituck 

Amy Kennedy Butler Star 

Tama Elaine Cathers Rosehill, KS 

Buck James Clark Jacksonville 

Wesley Todd Cook Durham 

Marian Patrice Covington Mebane 

Melissa Wayne Curry Greensboro 

Patricia Marie Dennis Raleigh 

Kelli Katherine Ferris Apex 

Carole Frischmann Paris France 

Stephen Stanley Galloway Memphis, TN 

Laura Bjurstrom Gaylord Dousman, WI 

Karen L. W. Goss Port Washington, NY 

Mary Chester Green Statesville 

Bobbi Jo Griffith Virginia Beach, VA 

Diane Lynn Gruhier Ventnor, NJ 

Sheila Baztan Hanby Wilmington 

Timothy Edward Herold Charlotte 

Raymond Albert Huml Gamer 

Amy Griffin Jessup Pilot Mountain 

Kevin David Jones, Jr Wilmington 

Erin Leigh Kaz Guilford, NH 

Deborah Simon Langford Raleigh 

Krista Marie Dubray LaPerle Rutland, VT 



77 



Dagny Jayne Leininger Wyomissing, PA 

Stephanie D. Meyer Smithton, PA 

Sybille Annette Miller Hobbs, NM 

Michelle Misavage-Jones Sharon, PA 

Bridget! Celeste Mitchell Greensboro 

Myles Roderic Moritz Havelock 

Melanie Smith Morris Tucson, AZ 

Roberta Rene Mothershead Greensboro 

Sonia Lea Mumford Chapel Hill 

Christian Douglas O'Malley Cary 

Colleen Yara Peat Fayetteville 

Janelle Rae Peccie Charlotte 

Leah Suzanne Prather Wilmington 

John Seidon Roberts Newton 

Elizabeth Sherman Roberts Hillsborough 

Karen Jean Rosenberry New Bloomfield, PA 

James Mark Sasser Mount Olive 

Megan Savory-Davis Harare, Zimbabwe 

Deborah Ruth Scarborough Lexington, KY 

Sonja Michelle Steelman-Szymeczek Kannapolis 

Sally Sides Steward Welcome 

Sandra Jo Strong Raleigh 

Francis Jan-Yeh Sun Durham 

Tonya Lin Tanner Forest City 

Scott Lee Trasti Angier 

Philip David VanHarreveld Santa Cruz De Sul, Brazil 

Dorothy Delight Wilson Raleigh 

Angela Marquita Wright Hickory 

Danny Lee Wright Polkton 

Brenda Dashner Yercheck Ft. Pierce, FL 

Christopher Carr York Sanford 

Stacey Barbara Young Oxon Hill, MD 

Virginia Nicholls Young Raleigh 



78 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS' AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN 

TEACHING 



Name 

Dr. M. Thomas Hester 



Department and College 

Department of English 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS' AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN 
TEACHING COLLEGE NOMINEES 



Name 

Dr. Richard R. Braham 

Dr. M. Thomas Hester 

Dr. Samuel Hudson 

Dr. Geraldine H. Luginbuhi 
Dr. Stephen E. Margolis 
Dr. James M. Nau 
Dr. John C. Park 
Dr. Richard R. Patty 
Dr. Michael Pause 
Dr. Phillip L. Sannes 



Department and College 

Department of Forestry 
College of Forest Resources 

Department of English 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry 
and Science 
College of Textiles 

Department of Microbiology 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Department of Economics 
College of Management 

Department of Civil Engineering 
College of Engineering 

Department of Mathematics and Science Education 
College of Education and Psychology 

Department of Physics 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Department of Design and Technology 
School of Design 

Department of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences 

and Radiology 

College of Veterinary Medicine 



79 



UNDERGRADUATE ALUMNI DISTINGUISHED PROFESSORS 



Name 

Dr. Gary B. Blank 

Dr. John M. Cullen 

Dr. Michele M. Magill 
Mr. Carol A. Pope 
Ms. Nancy Hill Snow 
Dr. C. Gerald Van Dyke 



Department and College 

Department of Forestry 
College of Forest Resources 

Department of Microbiology, Pathology 

and Parasitology 

College of Veterinary Medicine 

Department of Foreign Languages & Literature 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Department of Curriculum and Instruction 
College of Education and Psychology 

Department of Communication 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Department of Botany 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



Name 



GRADUATE ALUMNI DISTINGUISHED PROFESSORS 

Department and College 



Dr. Mason Pharr 



Dr. Robin Gardner 



Professor of Horticultural Science 
College of Agriculture and Life Science 

Professor of Nuclear and Chemical Engineering 
College of Engineering 



ALUMNI AWARD IN OUTREACH AND EXTENSION 

Name College 

Dr. Wilma S. Hammett College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Dr. Craig Brookins College of Education and Psychology 

Dr. R. Alan Schueler College of Engineering 



80 



ALUMNI OUTSTANDING RESEARCH AWARD 

Name Department and College 

Dr. Carl Koch 



Dr. Thomas Banks 



Dr. Walt Wolfram 



Department of Materials Science and Engineering 
College of Engineering 

Department of Mathematics 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Department of English 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



Name 

Dr. Stephen A. Bai 

Dr. Moody T. Chu 

Dr. L. Richard Delia Fave 

Dr. Tushar K. Ghosh 

Dr. Larry F. Grand 

Dr. Edward D. Gurley 

Dr. Jacqueline M. Hughes-Oliver 

Dr. David N. Hyman 

Mr. Bryce H. Lane 

Mr. Paul P. McCain 

Dr. Larysa Mykyta 



OUTSTANDING TEACHERS FOR 1995-96 

Department and College 



Department of Anatomy, Physiological Science, 

and Radiology 

College of Veterinary Medicine 

Department of Mathematics 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Department of Sociology and Anthropology 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Department of Textile and Apparel Management 
College of Textiles 

Department of Plant Pathology 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Department of Civil Engineering 
College of Engineering 

Department of Statistics 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Department of Economics 
College of Management 

Department of Horticultural Science 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Department of Civil Engineering 
College of Engineering 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



81 



Dr. Susan S. Osborne Department of Curriculum & Instruction 

College of Education and Psychology 

Dr. Samuel L. Pardue Department of Poultry Science 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Dr. J. Wayne Place Department of Architecture 

School of Design 

Mr. Herman A. Sampson DepartmentofAgricultural and Resource Economics 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Dr. Elisabeth A. Wheeler Department of Wood and Paper Science 

College of Forest Resources 

Dr. James R. Wilson Department of Industrial Engineering 

College of Engineering 



AWARDS FOR ACHIEVEMENT 
1995-96 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 

Highest Ranking Scholars. Holly A. Chandler, Chapin, SC; Deborah E. Citrin, Thomasville; Henry 
C. McDade, Hillsborough; Melanie L. Tew, Stedman, Christopher C. Wilms, Cary 

Agri-Life Council Outstanding Club Member Awards: 

African American Science and Health Society: Shirley E. Owino, Raleigh 

Agricultural & Extension Education Club: Lori L. Lucas, Mt. Holly 

Agronomy: Jonathan T. Linker, Mooresville 

Animal Science: David F. Correll, Cleveland 

Biochemistry: Kimberly L. Whitehead, Durham 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering: Science Curriculum - Gary C. Miller, Cary 

Agri-Business: Ronnie K. Hill, Temple, TX; 

Food Science: Caria M. Shook, Conover 

Horticultural Science: Carl P. Myers, Jr., Morganton 

Jeffersonians Club: Scott H. Phillips, Halifax 

National Agri-Marketing Association: Douglas S. Goodwin, Vale 

NCSU Collegiate 4-H Club: Joseph S. Enroughty, Nashville 

Poultry Science: Kevin I. Jones, Elk Park 

Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental: John P. Femald, Autryville 

Pre-Veterinary: Jennifer L. Hasty, Roanoke Rapids; Kip W. Lopez, Morrisville; Angela K. 
Redinger, Fairmont; John D. Shevock, Dover, DE 

Wildlife Biology: Brent N. Lineberger, Raleigh 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Outstanding Senior: Jennifer Roney, Mebane 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Outstanding Senior: Rhonda J. Hunt, Clayton 



82 



Scholastic Achievement: Rosemary D. Bowen, Walnut Cove 
Wall Street Journal: Rosemary D. Bowen, Walnut Cove 

Agronomy 

Senior Highest Scholastic Average in the Agronomy Club: Jamie A. Boaz, Yanceyville 
American Society of Agronomy Award, Most Outstanding Senior: Sheila J. Hughes, Durham 
Agronomy Club Leadership Award: Jason F. Joyce, Winston Salem 
Crop & Soil Science Senior Highest Scholastic Average: David J. Tucker, Laurel Spring 

Animal Science 

Most Outstanding Club Senior: Jason H. Wilson, Kittrell 

Most Outstanding Club Member: Lee A. Menius, Salisbury 

Most Outstanding New Club Member: Robert S. Betka, Kemersville 

Outstanding Senior in Animal Science: Holly A. Chandler, Chapin, SC 

American Society of Animal Science Undergraduate Awards: Katherine E. Barger, Davidson; 
Cortney C. Barkley, Belmont; Kara J. Bissett; Elizabeth City; Rosemary D. Bowen, Walnut Cove; 
Holly A. Chandler, Chapin, SC; Jeffrey T. Cole, Orlando, FL; Katherine V. Cutter, Asheville; Heidi 
H. Friedlein, Durham; Jonathan M. Gaddy, Zebulon; Christine E. Kistler, Raleigh; Kristine J. Lang, 
Harkers Island; Zane I. Lapinskes, Raleigh; Regina C. Linville, Madison; Laurie A. Lyon, Sanford; 
Wrenn W. Matthis, Clinton; Stephanie A. Moore, Asheville; Amy J. Poole, Manteo; Diane D. Porter, 
Apex; Russell L. Sprinkles, Belmont; Matthew B. Turner, Kinston; Ashley E. Webb, Clinton; Lori K. 
White, Raleigh. 

Biochemistry 

H. Robert Horton Award : Christina L. Thomas, Rockingham 

The American Institute of Chemists Foundation Outstanding Biochemistry Student Award: Jayne 
K. Goodman, Raleigh 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Student Honors Awards - North Carolina Student 
Engineering Branch of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers: Jamie J. Lancaster, Rocky 
Mount, 

Botany 

Outstanding Botany Senior: Laura J. Grignon, Charlotte 

Food Science 

B. M. Newell Award: Chris W. Pemell, Cary 

Forbes Leadership Award: Caria M. Shook, Conover 

Ambrosia Chocolate Top Scholar Award: Chris W. Pemell, Cary 

Leonard & Francis Crouch Scholastic Achievement Award: Carla M. Shook, Conover 

Horticultural Science 

Outstanding Senior Horticulturist Award: Leslie B. Booker, Manteo; Beverly A. Carroll, Concord 

Microbiology 

Most Outstanding Student: Robert K. Harrell, Henderson; Gregory W. Knapp, Cary 

Poultry Science 

T.T. Brown Poultry Science Club Award: Chad Larson, Sargeant, MN 

Zoology 

Zoology Senior Highest Scholastic Average: Henry C. McDade, Hillsborough 



83 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

Architecture Awards 

The American Institute of Architects Henry Adams Medal: Criteria: scholastic achievement, 
character, and promise of professional ability. Joseph Booth McCoy, Clarksville, Tennessee 

The American Institute of Architects Henry Adams Certificate of Merit: Criteria: scholastic 
achievement, character, and promise of professional ability. Phillipe Anton Jentsch, Monthey, 
Switzerland. 

Richard Green Award for Design Achievement: Criteria: greatest promise in design by a 
Bachelor of Architecture degree recipient. John Douglas Tucker, Springfield, VA. 

Architecture Faculty Award for Design Achievement: Criteria: greatest promise in design by a 
Bachelor of Environmental Design/ Architecture degree recipient. Ian Sherrod Gordon, Chapel Hill; 
Jamey Edward Glueck, Nashville. 

Alpha Rho Chi Medal: Criteria: ability for leadership... willing service to his or her school and 
program. ..promise of real professional merit through attitude and personality. Kenneth H. 
Friedlein, Raleigh. 

Golden Section Award: Criteria: appreciation for and creative application of technology in 
architecture. Amy Elizabeth DeDominicis, Durham. 

Academic Achievement Award: Criteria: graduate student with the highest grade point average. 
Jay Richard Fulkerson, Chapel Hill. 

Academic Achievement Award: Criteria: undergraduate student with the highest grade point 
average by a Bachelor of Architecture degree recipient. Phillipe Anton Jentsch, Monthey, 
Switzerland. 

Academic Achievement Award: Criteria: undergraduate student with the highest grade point 
average by a Bachelor of Environmental Design/Architecture degree recipient. David Bryan Hill, 
Greensboro. 

Technology Award: Criteria: professional level graduating student whose academic and design 
work best reflects an appreciation for and creative application of technology in architecture. James 
David Robertson, Raleigh. 

Urban Analysis Award: Criteria: awarded for an exemplary study of urban form and space. 
Catlin Emmett Tyler III, Midlothian, VA. 

Design and Technolgy Awards 

Design and Technology Faculty Book Awards in Design: Criteria: outstanding academic 
achievement in the Design curriculum with highest GPA and design excellence. Autumn Lee 
Stroupe, Monroe. 

Design arui Technology Faculty Book Awards in Design: Criteria: Great promise as a design 
professional. Benjamin Coble MacNeill, Raleigh. 

Design and Technology Graduate Faculty Book Award: Criteria: outstanding academic 
achievement in the graduate Design curriculum with highest GPA and design excellence. Valerie 
McGaughey, Raleigh. 

Graphic Design Awards 

Graphic Design Faculty Book Award: Criteria: academic and design excellence, contributions 
to the learning environment, and potential to engage the profession of graphic design by a graduate 
student. Elizabeth Crawford Throop, Raleigh. 

Graphic Design Faculty Book Award: Criteria: academic and design excellence, contributions 
to the learning environment, and potential to engage the profession of graphic design by a recipient 
of the Bachelor of Environmental Design/Graphic Design recipient. Dianne Virginia Hall, 
Leicester. 



84 



Industrial Design Awards 

Design and Technology Faculty Book Award in Industrial Design: Criteria: outstanding 
academic achievement in the Industrial E>esign curriculum with highest GPA and design excellence 
Justin Alan Chambers, Chapel Hill. 

Design and Technology Graduate Faculty Book Award: Criteria: outstanding academic 
achievement in the graduate Industrial Design curriculum with highest GPA and design excellence. 
Daniel McMichael Stipe, Raleigh. 

Industrial Designers Society of America Student Merit Award: Criteria: outstanding graduate in 
Industrial Design: Jonathan Tad Templeton, Greensboro. 

Landscape Architecture Awards 

The American Society of Landscape Architects Certificate of Honor: Criteria: scholarship and 
accomplishment in skills related to the art and technology of Landscape Architecture. Alicia Louise 
Berry, Raleigh. Katherine Frances Dow, Raleigh. Anne Louise Valentine, Carrboro. 

The American Society of Landscape Architects Certificate of Merit: Criteria: scholarship and 
accomplishment in skills related to the art and technology of Landscape Architecture. Rodney Todd 
Eason, Clayton; William Anthony McGee, Germanton; Patrick Graham Pleasants, Raleigh 

The North Carolina American Society of Landscape Architects Book Award: Criteria: total 
scholastic performance and professional promise. Michael Jeffrey Norris, Lenoir. 

Landscape Architecture Faculty Honor Award: Criteria: outstanding academic performance and 
design excellence in Landscape Architecture. Anne Louise Valentine, Carrboro. 

Landscape Architecture Faculty Service Award: Criteria: for dedicated service in support of 
faculty and students in the Department of Landscape Architecture. Yvonne Gorman Maher, 
Raleigh. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Education Council Outstanding Senior Awards: 

Health Occupations Teacher Education: Barry Dean Watkins, Bahama 

Mathematics Education (high school): Dorothy Cummins Malpass, Turkey 

Mathematics Education (middle school): Cherre Hope Simpson, Gamer 

Middle Grades Language Arts and Social Studies: Kathleen Ryan VanOrmer, Summerfieid 

Psychology (outstanding graduating senior): Kevin Archer Pelphrey, Raleigh 

Psychology (general option): Kristopher Jason Preacher, Taylorsville 

Psychology (human resource development option): Kristina Michelle Ringler, Raleigh 

Science Education (high school): Heidi Chandler Willard, Raleigh 

Science Education (middle school): Conrad Keith Streeter, Alamogordo, NM 

Technology Education: Brian Thomas Smith, Raleigh 

Departmental Awards: 

Durwin M. Hanson Achievement Award (Occupational Education): Lori Lynn Lucas, Raleigh 
Epsilon Pi Tau Leadership Award (Technology Education): William Cecil Reece, Whitsett 
Outstanding Teaching Assistants: Daniel Cliffe, Burgaw; Kathy Griffin, Atlanta, GA 
Mathematics Education Service Award to Outstanding Teacher: Donald McGurrin, Wendell 
Psychology Department Award for Service to the Department: Connie Lee Shelton, Raleigh 
Psychology Department Award for Academic Achievement: Bernard Philip Bowling IV, Surf 

City; William Arthur George, Nags Head 

Psychology Department Award for Research: Scott Andrew Wowra, Raeford 
Science Education Service Award to Outstanding Teacher: Linda H. Hicks, Raleigh 



85 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Engineering Senior Award for Scholarly Achievement: Stephanie Manfredi, Hickory (Chemical 
Engineering) 

Engineering Senior Award for Citizenship and Service: Michael Chou, Durham (Electrical and 
Computer Engineering) 

Engineering Senior Award for Leadership: Aaron P. Maurer, Knoxville, TN (Electrical and 
Computer Engineering) 

Engineering Senior Award for the Humanities: Catherine M. Rose, Reidsville (Mechanical and 
Aerospace Engineering); Charles B. Parker, Cary (Materials Science & Engineering) 

Dean's Achievement Award - 1996: John C. O'Quinn, Fuquay Varina (Chemical Engineering) 

BIOLOGICAL and AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Agri-Life Council Outstanding Club Member Award for Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering: Engineering Curriculum: Gary C. Miller, Cary 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers Student Honor Award: North Carolina Student 
Engineering Branch of ASAE: Jamie J. Lancaster, Rocky Mount 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Hoechst Celanese Award for Academic Excellence: To Be Announced 
Hoechst Celanese Award for Excellence in Leadership: To Be Announced 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Associated General Contractors Award to Outstanding Senior in Civil Engineering/Construction 
Option: John T. Delzell, Greensboro 

Outstanding Teaching Assistant Awards: Kasey D. Trimble, Washington, WV; Sean H. 
Anderson, Raleigh 

Stephan Sqfran/PCEA-Triangle Chapter Student Estimators Award: Victor C. Smith, 
Wrightsville Beach 

Institute of Transportation Senior Award - Fall 1995: Robert T. Burlington, Greenville 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Scholarly Achievement: Joel Gray, Mt. Airy 
Humanities: Toni G. Whitaker, Rocky Mount 
Citizenship and Service: Carolyn Knott, Durham 

ELECTRICAL and COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

Outstanding Electrical Engineering Senior Award: Sarah K. Soutt, Raleigh 
Outstanding Computer Engineering Senior Award: Joseph A. Delgross, Cary 
Outstanding IEEE Student Award: Roy L. Draughn, Asheboro 
College of Engineering Outstanding Senior Nominees: 
Scholarly Achievement: Joseph A. Delgross, Cary 
Leadership: Roy L. Draughn, Asheboro 
Citizenship and Service: Michael Chou, Durham 
Humanities: Jan E. Vandemeer, Pleasant Valley, NY 

FURNTTURE MANUFACTURING and MANAGEMENT 

Rudolph Willard Award, Outstanding Senior in Furniture Manufacturing and Management: 
Luke D. Barger, Hickory 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Outstanding Senior in Industrial Engineering: Paula L. Borden, Columbus, OH 



86 



MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

Departmental Senior Award in Leadership: Julie P. Martin, Charlotte 

Departmental Senior Award in Citizenship and Service: Francis B. Neal, Jr., Rockingham 

Departmental Senior Award in Scholarly Achievement: Corey J. Senowitz, Raleigh 

Josephus Daniels Scholarship 95-96: Michelle D. Morse, Fuquay-Varina 

Dr. Charles R Manning Accident Reconstruction Analysis, Inc. Scholarship for 95-96: Corey J. 

Senowitz, Raleigh 

Mrs. L. P. Doshi Scholarship: Charles B. Parker, Cary 

A. J. Fletcher Music Scholarship: Michael T. Capps, Wilmington 

John A. Boren Merit Scholarship: Kevin C. Cheek, Cary 

MECHANICAL and AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

ASME Outstanding Student Member: Catherine M. Rose, Reidsviile 

Pi Tau Sigma Outstanding Senior Award: Catherine M. Rose, Reidsviile 

AIAA Southeast Regional Conference: Outstanding Student Paper Presentation: Eric N. Burcsu, 

Cary 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Outstanding Nuclear Engineering Senior Award: Nathan Sutton, Charlotte 



COLLEGE OF FOREST RESOURCES 

Forestry 

Biltmore Forest Work Scholarship: Daniel Carpenter, Kings Mountain; T. Matthew Grzebien, 
Cary; Charles D. Hines, Hillsborough; Everett C. Jenkins, Washington. 

James L. Goodwin Work Scholarship: E. Brian Absher, Elkin; Andrew L. Baker, Cramerton; 
Jennifer Barnes, Duluth, GA; Thomas E. Huffman, Virginia Beach, VA; Danny R. Ledford, Slier 
City; M. Troy Lucas, Charlotte; Ryan Norris, Castle Hayne; John Nicosia, Raleigh; Kyle E. 
Parshall, Raleigh; Boice E. Triplett, Belmont. 

George K. Slocum Endowed Work Scholarship: Jennifer M. Willoughby, Fuquay-Varina. 

Dan K. Spears Endowed Work Scholarship: Jennifer M Willoughby, Fuquay-Varina. 

John M. and Sally Blalock Beard Academic Scholarship: Edward B. Cole, Highlands; Helen S. 
O'Donnell, Raleigh; Philip R. Whitfield, Hurdle Mills. 

Ralph C Bryant Academic Scholarship: Daniel Carpenter, Kings Mountain; Doug Burleson, 
Lumberton. 

Edwin F. Conger Academic Scholarship: Cynthia D. Buster, Alexandria, VA; Wesley A. 
Ledford, Lawndale. 

James L. Goodwin Academic Scholarship: Andrew L. Baker, Cramerton; Stephen P. Bennett, 
Candler; Thomas W. Bevier, Sanford; Tabatha G. Bledsoe, Creston; Cynthia Buster, Alexandria, 
VA; DeVela J. Clark, Raleigh; James Cooper, Arlington, VA; Jeffrey L. Correll, Hudson; Amy E. 
Gatlin, Raleigh; Karin Hess, Knightdale; Barry C. Jackson, Jr., Angier; Heather A. Kendall, 
Worthington, OH; Robert C. McClure, West Jefferson; Kathy Messerschmidt, Lynchburg, VA; 
Keith R. Money, Lexington; Susan Ritter, Greensboro; Jeffrey L. Wait, Candler. 

Jonathan Wainhouse Memorial Academic Scholarship: Jennifer R. Miller, Charlotte. 

Hofmann Forest Academic Scholarship: Christopher R. Blanton, Kings Mountain; Jeremy S. 
Brinkley, Lexington; Jennifer L. Buzzard, Raleigh; Kirk R. Chitia, Raleigh; DeVela J. Clark, 
Raleigh; Edward B. Cole, Highlands; Timothy M. Disclafani, Cary; Kelley M. Duffield, Cary; 
Kevin W. Gainey, Kannapolis; Theresa L. Galinski, Greensboro; Michael R. McCoy, Clarksville, 
TN; John A. Papalas, Greenville. 

Victor W. Herlevich Academic Scholarship: Amy E. Gatlin, Raleigh. 

Maki-Gemmer-Johnson Summer Camp Academic Scholarship: Kristofer C. Baker, Fuquay- 
Varina; Steven P. Bennett, Candler; Daniel R. Carpenter, Kings Mountain. 

U.S. Forest Service Science Award: Kevin Wayne Gainey, Kannapolis, NC 



87 



Parks, Recreation and Tourism Manangement 

Outstanding New PRTM Student: Adrienne Bailey, Lumberton 

Outstanding Underclassman: Stephen Watson, Kenly 

Thomas I. Mines Award: Elizabeth Griffith, Gary 

Outstanding Graduate Student: Nancy Bell Edwards, Gary 

Outstanding Teacher: Dr. Roger Moore 

Going the Extra Mile Teacher: Annette Moore 

Going the Extra Mile Student: Sue Yerkes, Raleigh 

Going the Extra Mile Staff Member: Reggi Powell 

College of Forest Resources Outstanding African American Graduate Student: Teri Whyte, 
Sandford, Florida 

N.C. Recreator's Foundation Scholarship: Ghristy Mingis, Gary; Laura White, Fuquay-Varina 

Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Hoffman Forest Endowed 
Scholarship: Jennifer E. Britt, Greensboro; Laura Bryson, Brevard; Isarel A. Fountain, Raleigh; 
Teresa Llerena, Raleigh 

Wood and Paper Science 

Pulp and Paper Science 

Alonzo Aldrich Scholarship: Sherri Tennille Vollmer, Louisburg 

Asea Brown Bovier, Inc. Scholarship: Elizabeth Ann Wones, Kettering, OH 

Betz Laboratories, Inc. Scholarship: Erik Sean Edwards, Femandina Bch., FL 

C. Cline Peters Scholarship: Michael Alan Halstead, Pollocksville 

Caraustar Industries Scholarship: Timothy Cornelius Jones, Hopkins, SG 

Carol & Carter Fox Scholarship: Matthew David Gampbell, Femandina Bch., FL 

Cascade Industries Scholarship: Eugene Anthony Foster, Greensboro 

Charles W. Coker, Sr. Scholarship: Robert Ghung-Hua Yang, Ghesterfield, VA 

CIBA-GEIGY Corporation Scholarship: William M. Ponton, Hertford 

Class of 1 966 Scholarship: Mr. Bradley Earle Lucas, Raleigh 

David Bossen Scholarship: Kerri Gray Knight, Brown Summit 

Dietrich V. Asten Scholarship: Glenn Jason Martin, Harrisburg, PA 

Dr. Fred B. Schelhor Scholarship: Melissa Garol Ricks, Wilmington 

Drs. Li-S. & Lee-F. Chang Scholarship: Ghristopher H. Alexander, Bronx, NY 

Dwight J. Thomson Scholarship: William Ashley Sparks, Roanoke Rapids 

E. E. Ellis Scholarship: Shannon Marie Bumgamer, Hickory 

E. J. & S. W. Brickhouse Scholarship: Ryan David Hobbs, New Bern 

E. J. "Woody" Rice Family Scholarship: Matthew Christian Quick, Arrington, VA 

Eric L. Ellwood Scholarship: Karen Reiko Shigehara, Raleigh 

George E. Oakley, Jr. Scholarship: Greg Bryan Gardner, New Bern 

Harry H. Saunders Scholarship: Jason Allen Mayberry, Goose Greek, SG 

Hazard H. & Ada May Scholarship: Angela Elizabeth Hylton, Washington 

Hercules. Inc. Scholarship: Holly Elizabeth Grain, Tryon 

International Paper Co. Scholarship: Jennifer Louise Hinson, Albemarle 

International Paper Scholarship (NCSU) Alumni #1: Andrew Lee Weller, Washington 

International Paper Scholarship (NCSU) Alumni #2: Michael A. Will, Matthews 

James River Corporation Scholarship: Donna Lynn Gleaton, Dinwiddle, VA 

James M. Piette Scholarship: Rebecca Ann Geiger, Albany, GA 

John A. Heitmann, III Scholarship: E. Scott Tedder, Ghadboum 

John L Moore Scholarship: Steven Ghristopher Bacon, Dudley, LA 

John M. May, Jr. Scholarship: Kendra Krystyna Batley, Wilmington 

Kamine Eng. & Mechan. Scholarship: Andrew Haisten Linn, Lynchburg, VA 

Lawrence H. Camp Scholarship: James Edwin Gawthome, Jr., Lynchburg, VA 

M. Lebby Boinest. Jr. Scholarship: Marcus Wayne Barnes, Roanoke Rapids 

Mark J. Alexander Scholarship: Michele K. Bennett, Greenville 

Michael I. Sherman Scholarship: Christina Gay Buchanan, Spruce Pine 

88 



Nalco Chemical Scholarship: Christopher L. Swift, Dalton, MA 

Nalco Chemical Company Scholarship: Valerie Jean Vonnoh, Yulee, FL 

Paper Chase Scholarship: Lynette Dawn Griffm, Williamston 

PIMA-Southeastern Division Scholarship: Terri Dorinda Lail, Hildebran 

PPF: Derek Roy Morris, Elkin 

PPF: Daphne Jerrene Moses, Fayetteville 

PPF: Benjamin Dale Moore, Roanoke Rapids 

PPF: Cynthia Camille Winston, Wake Forest 

PPF: Lena Renee Williams, Richmond, VA 

PPF: James Christian Samp, Mechanicsville, VA 

PPF: Alicia Nhu Uyen Pham, Rock Hill, SC 

PPF: Ginger Ann Yockel, Williamston 

PPF: MyHa Thi Hoang, Rockhille, SC 

PPF: Brian Wells Jones, Columbia, SC 

PPF: Roger Jordan Laufer, Florence, SC 

PPF: Nathan William Jones, New Bern 

PPF: Mary Beth Harris, Pantego 

PPF: Keith Alan Donaldson, Canton 

PPF: Clayton Baylor Metcalfe, Roanoke Rapids 

PPF: April Elise Cassano, West Point, VA 

PPF: Miranda Renee Martin, Rock Hill, SC 

PPF: Cory Hall Knox, Williamston 

Ray Smith Scholarship: David Arthur Council, Williamston 

Rector/Ashcraft Scholarship: Harry Atkins Lawton, III, Kingsport, TN 

Richard H. Owens Scholarship: Spencer Frederick Adams, Laurinburg 

Robert G. Hitchings Scholarship: Valerie Ivy Pai, Raleigh 

Robert L. Bentley Scholarship: Phillip Todd Jordan, Rock Hill, SC 

Ronald Estridge Family Scholarship: George Brent Shorter, Roanoke, VA 

Scapa Group, Inc. Scholarship: Thomas Joseph Jenn, Raleigh 

Sonoco (NCSU) Alumni Scholarship: Michele Leigh Parsons, Rock Hill, SC 

Stone Container Corporation Scholarship: Richard Busbee Phillips, Mobile, AL 

Sture J. Olsson Scholarship: Joseph Eliot Malak, Cumberland, MD 

Sunds Defibrator. Inc. Scholarship: Sue Ann Quick, Arrington, VA 

Terry P. Charbonnier Scholarship: Eric Steven Thompsen, Burgess, VA 

The Shouvlin Family Scholarship: Anthea Yen Chun Wu, Cary 

Thiele Kaolin Scholarship: Matthew James Morgan, Moon, VA 

Tidewater Construction Scholarship: Kevin William South, West Point, VA 

Turner Family Scholarship: Nathaniel M. Meacham, Chesterfield, VA 

Union Camp Corporation Scholarship: Matthew Aaron Turner, Suffolk, VA 

Valmet Corporation Scholarship: Wesley Boyd Petrea, Kannapolis 

Vinings Industries Scholarship: Chancey Boyce Washburn, Albany, GA 

Westvaco Corporation Scholarship: Jon Russell Jackson, Ashland, VA 

Weyerhaeuser Company Scholarship: Veronica Jill Huneycutt, Albemarle 

Will P. Lovin Scholarship: Timothy Lee Schleining, Pisgah Forest 

Willamette Industries, Inc. Scholarship: Britt Mills Haddock, Ayden 

William M. Bailey Scholarship: Paul Michael Jctt, Raleigh 

Wm. V. Cross Scholarship: Christopher L. Swift, Dalton, MA 

Wood Products 

Coastal Lumber Company Scholarship: J. Collins Fitts, Roanoke Rapids 

Cochrane Furniture Company Scholarship: Pamela R. Wall, Casar 

Eurodrawer Scholarship: Billy W. Esra, Mocksville; Kendall C. Walker, Mocksville; Eric L. 
Wiliness, Mocksville 

Jerry G. Williams & Sons. Inc. Scholarship: Sampson E. Neumann, Smithfield 

Lampe & Malphrus Lumber Company Scholarship: Laurie A. Pittman, Clayton 



89 



Roy M. Carter Endowed Scholarship: Bernard C. Harberts, Statesville 
Thomas Forshaw, Jr. Endowed Scholarship: Stephen M. LaFrance, Wilmington 
Toney Lumber Company Scholarship: James E. Bailey, Louisburg 

Weyerhaeuser Company Scholarship: Kyle D. Evans, Marion; David P. Laramee, Raleigh; 
Robert M. PaduUa, Jr., Matthews 



COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences: William Arthur George, Nags Head; John Caviness 
O'Quinn, Fuquay-Varina; Teresa Ellen Valliere, Raleigh 

Department of Communication: Misty Leann Hankins, Martinsville, VA 

Department of English: Maureen Deborah Tinnesz, Raleigh 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures: Catherine Michelle Rose, Reidsville 

Department of History: Megan Lynn Pauls, Washington, DC 

Division of Multidisciplinary Studies: John Caviness O'Quiim, Fuquay Varina 

Social Work: Teresa Ellen Valliere, Raleigh 
Department of Philosophy and Religion: Bobby-Joe Shepard, Jacksonville 
Department of Political Science and Public Administration: Kathryn Lee Hunter, Dobson 
Department of Sociology and Anthropology: William Arthur George, Nags Head 
CHASS Council Outstanding Senior Award: Cole Lee Russing, Boone 



COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT 

High Ranking Seniors: 

College of Management: 

Fall 1995 Jette Buhelt Olsen, Raleigh 

Spring 1996 Yijiang Joanna Shi, Raleigh 

Department of Accounting: 

Fall 1995 Nancy H. Johnson, Raleigh 

Spring 1996 Lianne Lowell, Raleigh 

Department of Business: 

Fall 1995 Jette Buhelt Olsen, Raleigh 

Spring 1996 Kristen Nicole Broadway, Wake Forest 

Department of Economics: 

Fall 1995 Danield Patrick West, Gamer 

Spring 1996 Yijiang Joanna Shi, Raleigh 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

College Awards to Outstanding Seniors: 
Scholarly Achievement: 

Fall 1995 Tiffany Michelle Barnes, Greensboro 

Spring 1996 Mary Patricia Campbell, Raleigh 



90 



Leadership: 

Fall 1995 Kristie Ann Cook, Mount Airy 

Spring 1996 Todd Douglas Fuller, Charlotte; Tonya Shea Coffey, 

Lenoir 

Research: 

Fall 1995 John Michael Woodell, Morganton 

Spring 1996 Mary Patricia Campbell, Raleigh 

Chemistry Department 

The Merck Index Awards for Scholastic Achievement: Andrew Kiskadden Boal, Raleigh; 
Robert Timothy Mathers, Willow Springs 

The CRC Press Freshman Chemistry Achievement Award: Jennifer Lea Catanzaro, Hickory; 
Reagan Josephine Greene, Ferguson 

AICF - American Institute of Chemists' Foundation: Juliette Christine Bates, Raleigh 

1996 Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry: John Robert Kitchin, Cary 

Hypercube Scholar: Craig Michael Micallef, Kitty Hawk 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department: 

Outstanding Graduating Senior in Marine Sciences: Christopher Lee Hamblet, Raleigh 
Outstanding Graduating Senior in Earth Sciences: Srinivas Krishnasami, Cary 
Outstanding Graduating Senior in Atmospheric Sciences: Christian Winford Barnes, 
Salisbury; Darrell Bryan Ensley, Harrisburg 
Outstanding Teaching Assistant Awards: 

Marine Sciences: James McFall Epps, Salisbury 

Earth Sciences: Adrienne Gaughan, Raleigh; Matthew James Heller, Raleigh 

Atmospheric Sciences: Regi George Oommen, Raleigh 

Mathematics Department: 

Outstanding Graduating Senior in Mathematics: Mary Patricia Campbell, Raleigh 
John Cell Scholarship: Elizabeth Kathryn Hunt, Durham 

Mary Alice and Hubert V. Park Scholarship: Tamara Brooke Rosenbaum, Winston-Salem 
Jack Levine-Charles Anderson Award: Mary Patricia Campbell, Raleigh; Christopher Ryan 

Vinroot, Charlotte 

Charles Anderson Scholarship: Dustin Frederick Kapraun, Wilmington 

Charles F. Lewis Scholarship: Karen Jean Johnson, Moravian Falls 

Mrs. Robert C. Bullock Scholarship: Carolyn Elizabeth Hollack, Raleigh 

The Maltbie Award: Peter Garth Hardy, Raleigh; Rebecca Jo Krakowski, Raleigh 

Lowell S. Winton/Nicholas I. Rose Scholarship: Vaidyanath Mani, Raleigh 

Howard A. Petrea Scholarship: Phoebe Allison Profitt, Boone 

Carey Mumford Scholarship: John Wesley Cain, Greenville 

Outstanding Teaching Assistant Awards: Christopher Mark Lyerly, Raleigh; John Vivian 

(Matt) Matthews III, Raleigh; Amanda Buffington Matthews, Raleigh; John Robert Peach, Durham; 

Jeffrey David Schroeter, McLean, VA 

Physics Department: 

Outstanding Graduating Seniors in Physics: Mary Patricia Campbell, Raleigh; William Seth 
Hartley, Lexington; Tonya Shea Coffey, Lenoir 

Nancy Chung Freshman Scholarship: Christopher Lynn Hinkle, Cumberland, MD 



91 



Statistics Department: 

Outstanding Graduating Seniors in Statistics: 

Fall 1995 - Tiffany Marie Morgan, Raleigh 

Spring 1996 - Carol Lynn Smith Dukes, Fuquay-Varina; Tara Lynn 

Knowles, Autryville 
F. E. McVay Scholarship: Leslie Meredith Stroupe, Mount Airy 
SAS Institute Scholarship: Sarah Jane Holshouser, Newton 

Outstanding Teaching Assistant Awards: Erin Elyse Blankenship, Raleigh; Alan Hughes 
Hartford, Raleigh; Bridget Gillian Mahoney, Raleigh 

Paige Plagge Graduate Award for Citizenship: Russell Alpizar, Raleigh 
Mendenhall Teaching Scholars: 

Summer 1995 - Scott Alan Langfeldt, Gary 

Summer 1996 - Lei Zhu, Raleigh 

1995-96 Gertrude Mary Cox Fellowship Award: Lorraine Marie Vorburger, Raleigh 
Academic Achievement Award Fellows: 

Gertrude Mary Cox Academic Achievement Award Fellows: 

Outstanding PhD Candidate - Seongyeon Kim, Raleigh 

Outstanding M.S. Candidate - Stephanie Brumfield Monks, Raleigh 

Outstanding PhD Qualifier - Alan Hughes Hartford, Raleigh 



COLLEGE OF TEXTILES 

Joseph D. Moore Honor Award: Julie Renee Hayes, Rural Hall 

Lawrence Jason Honor Award: Bradley Mark McLawhom, Fayetteville 

Chester H Roth Honor Award: Emily Caroline Paul, Aurora 

John M. Reeves Scholarship: Mindy Estelle Lowder, Norwood 

John E. Reeves Award: Stacey Lynne Bolen, Washington 

Donald F. McCullough Award: Adam David Dunefsky, Raleigh 

American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists Award: Andrea Rene Howington, 

Cameron 

The American Institute of Chemists Foundation Award: Jonathan Michael Thomas, Gamer 

Phi Psi Textile Fraternity Award: Suzannah Lynn Poteat, Salisbury 

American Association for Textile Technology Award: Edie Renn Parish, Aberdeen 

Kappa Tau Beta Student Leadership Award: Julie Renee Hayes, Rural Hall 

Delta Kappa Phi Textile Fraternity: Andrea Rene Howington, Cameron 

AAMA - Apparel Student of the Year: Caroline Berry Bolt, Greenville 

Henry A. Rutherford Honorary Award: Kelly Michelle Tinga, Wilmington 

Peter R Lord Textile Engineering Design Leadership Award: Monroe Keidi Spillman, Jr., 

Salisbury 

Hoechst Celanese Excellence Award for Leadership: Michelle Leigh Uren, Shelby 
Hoechst Celanese Excellence Award in Academics: To Be Announced 
Hoechst Celanese Excellence Award in Graduate Studies: To Be Announced 



ALUMNI ATHLETIC AWARD 

Todd Douglas Fuller, Charlotte 



92 



THE HONOR SOCIETY OF 
PHI BETA KAPPA 

INITIATED - SPRING 1996 



John Michael Angelo 
Jennifer Lee Autry 
Stewart Campbell Aycock 
Laura Minwer Badwan 
Marcus Wayne Barnes 
Burton Kyle Batten 
Ethan Victor Brown 
Rebecca Jean Brown 
John Wesley Cain 
Keith Kaz Contre 
Colleen Anne Coyle 
Laura Camille Daughtry 
Jay Lawrence Dunbar 
Jo Beth Eakin 
Sharon Monk Elledge 
Laura Erin England 
Peter James Erikson 
Daniel Ali Ettefagh 
Megan Pauls 
Amy Michelle Finger 
Donna Diane Floyd 



Carol Anne Fuller 
Jeffrey Andrew Gage 
Shirley Michelle Garoutte 
Tiffany Rachelle Goins 
Stephanie Kay Gregory 
Laura Jeanne Grignon 
Robert Daniel Hancock 
Joel Michael Hartman 
Jennifer Marie Howard 
Amy Marie Jackson 
Jennifer Maureen Kilgore 
Tara Lynn Knowles 
Patrick Lerome Leary 
Thomas Aaron Ledford 
Alexander Benton Legrand 
Regina Carol Linville 
John Paul Morgan Longphre 
Michael David Madritch 
Elizabeth Hope Maguire 
Kristen Lynn Neuharth 
Chad Derek Norman 



Pamela Thompson Offner 
Dana Louise Pearce 
Kristina Michelle Ringler 
Jason Owen Rose 
Tamara Brooke Rosenbaum 
Jonathan Charles Routh 
Lynn Jamie Rubin 
Carmen LeAnne Sanders 
Elizabeth Anne Smith 
Leslie Elizabeth Smith 
Steven Carl Spruill 
Elizabeth Marie Sutton 
Susan Jordan Turner 
Lavanya Prabhakar Vaidya 
Christopher Ryan Vinroot 
Lawrence Lee Wentz 
Gillian Norton Will 
Patrick Cecil Winstead 
April Ann Wood 
Erica Claire Yaeger 
Heather Marie Yandle 



INITUTED - FALL 1995 



Laura Rebecca Bach 
Lynne Attix Blair 
Hunter Lynn Blanton 
Rebecca Susan Bookout 
Anita Jeanne Borton 
Ryan Patrick Boyles 
Jason Patrick Burton 
Samantha Margaret Clark 
Steven Wayne Craft 
Damon Russell Dellafave 
Frank Ethan Dickey 
Emili Rachele Duke 
Marissa Lee Earles 
Erika Leigh Farr 
Katherine Ellen Fielden 
Carol Nicole Friddle 
Michael Hart Glasheen 



Kerry Lynn Hammond 
Misty Leann Hankins 
Jenny Rebecca Helton 
Joan Rlee Henderson 
Courtney Lynne High 
Heidi Jeanette Hughes 
Kathryn Lee Hunter 
Meja Trienne Johnson 
Alberta Olivia Burkett Keel 
John Robert Kitchin 
Christopher Keith Lannon 
Tammy Karrie-Cheng Low 
Michael S Luhrs 
William Joseph Lyerly 
Deborah Ware Mettler 
Michelle Callahan Nielsen 
Christopher Allen Parham 



Akash Arvind Patel 
Phoebe Alison Proffit 
Karen Ruth Quinn 
Amanda Gayle Ray 
Robin Jeanette Ray 
Sarah Kristen Reeves 
Emily Itara Richardson 
Jeannie Gail Sifford 
Kelly Anne Sigmon 
Joseph Andrew Simmons 
Erin Mary Simons 
Christian Suzanne Spruill 
Scott Robin Starin 
Domenic John Tiani 
Chaffee William Viets 
Nanditha Vivekananthan 
John William Wilson 
Scott Andrew Wowra 



INITUTED - SPRING 1995 



Kathryn Elizabeth Adams 
Marie Renee Archambault 
Donald Lee Bailey, Jr. 
Jennifer Ross Balkcum 



Jayne Keifer Goodman 
Aaron James Green 
Robin Lynne Grice 
Leyla Suzan Gunduz 



John Caviness O'Quinn 
Denise Lynette Overcash 
Kimberly Rae Parks 
Laura Ann Pate 



93 



Christian Winford Barnes 
Tiffany Michelle Barnes 
Maria Salazar Baucom 
Patrick Herbert Baumgart 
Erin Michele Beebe 
Gavin Douglas Blosser 
Laurie Anne Bowler 
Bernard Philip Bowling 
Scott Harris Brown 
Mary Catherine Bruton 
Kerry Eleanore Buckley 
Christopher Sothoron Byrd 
Mary Patricia Campbell 
Michael Thomas Capps 
Crystal Noel Carter 
Troy Alan Carter 
Sonya Marie Chauvin 
Elizabeth Ann Chesnut 
Angela Marie Cheyunski 
Deborah Eva Citrin 
Everette Wayne Coates 
Tonya Shea Coffey 
Christina Lynn Cole 
Dennis James Coleman 
Timothy Harper Col v in 
Carolyn Marie Conlee 
Jason Todd Cooke 
William Bamette Corkey 
David Kemp Covington, Jr. 
Kevyn Moore Creech 
Andrew Michael Crocker 
Suzanne Marie Cukla 
Ryan Michael Czerwiec 
Kathryn Aline Deiulio 
John Paul Denny 
Joby Edward Dixon 
Katherine F. Dow 
Karyn Lois Dumas 
Derek Brent Efird 
Edgar Garcia Estupinan 
Erik Leigh Evans 
Laura Lynn Fierke 
Todd Douglas Fuller 
Elizabeth Sawyer Futrell 
Pamela Southerland Gabriel 
Dawn Marie Gardner 
Rebecca Jean Gatlin 
William Arthur George 
Suzanne L. Gerrior 
Joel Marcus Gilbert 



Jonathan Saunders Harb 
Kristin Anissa Hardin 
Heather Christina Harmon 
Robert Kevin Harrell 
William Seth Hartley 
Rodney Ray Hartsell 
Andrea Janel Hayes 
Ray Devouse Hayes 
Diann Marie Heibel 
Frederick Allen Hewett II 
Rebecca Sue Hoffenberg 
Jason Donald Home 
Christopher Thomas Hudgin 
Heather Edith Hughes 
Stev'en Gerald Humphrey 
Joshua Montgomery Humphreys 
Elizabeth Kathryn Hunt 
William Frederick Hunt 
Priscilla Speed Hunter 
Allison Brook Isaak 
John Eric Jelovsek 
Ryan Lea Jessup 
Phyllis Carol Jones 
Christopher Knox Karlof 
William Michael Kieman 
Jennifer Lynn King 
Kristen Michelle Kleiss 
Gregory William Knapp 
Danielle Jean Kriner 
Amy Cheryl Langdon 
Faera Irma Ledford 
Shiriey Faucette Leroy 
Christopher Lochmuller 
Adam Edward Majewski 
Kristen Marie Marshall 
Scott Walter Marshall 
Paulette Hotte Martin 
Robert Franklin Martin 
Sandeep Matai 
John Vivian Matthews III 
Craig Jennings McCotter 
Henry Cooper McDade 
Lori Renee McDowell 
Jeanine Marie McKeon 
Bridget Temwa McNamara 
Craig Michael Micallef 
Lisa Morgan Moore 
Amy Jeanette Nail 
Scott David Nash 
Christopher Todd Nixon 



Amy Louise Patterso 
Amy Elizabeth Paul 
Lisa Malaika Perantoni 
Christopher Britt Peterson 
Heather Lynn Peterson 
David Russell Phillips 
Heather Angela Philp 
Rebecca Ann Plummer 
Natalie Dickerson Prewitt 
Michelle Denise Prysby 
Donald Worthington Puliiam 
James David Rhodes 
Lee Taylor Roberts 
Catherine Michelle Rose 
Cole Lee Russing 
Deborah Kay Sanders 
Barbara S. Scott 
Justin David Scranton 
Jodi Lynn Sekula 
John Phillip Sharpe 
Yijiang Shi 
Erika Alys Silver 
Carol Lynn Smith 
Matthew John Smith 
Kathryn Elizabeth Snead 
Roy Thomas Stamper 
Allison Rae Steele 
Grant Morey Stevens 
Catherine Lizabeth Summer 
Valerie Tavares 
Rebecca L. Tedrick 
Melanie Lynn Tew 
Christina Lea Thomas 
Maureen Deborah Tinnesz 
Johann V. Torres 
Susan Tsui 
Anne Marie Tumier 
Winnie Rae Tyndall 
Christopher Ro Vaillancourt 
Teresa Ellen Valliere 
Dana Denise Weatherspoon 
Kimberiy Lynne Whitehead 
Robert Benton Williams 
Valerie Leigh Whitmire 
Christopher Carrick Wilms 
John Michael Woodell 
Vincent Timothy Woods 
Linda Rawlings Youmans 
Melissa Amy Young 
Leigh Anne Yow 



94 



THE HONOR SOCIETY OF 
PHI KAPPA PHI 

INITIATED - 1996 



Lori N. Adams 
Matthew C. Anderson 
Imelda Ariani 
Muqsit Ashraf 
Melinda G. Auman 
Laura G. Aycock 
Donald L. Bailey, Jr. 
Steven P. Bailey 
Megan E. Bartnick 
Burton K. Batten 
Lynne A. Blair 
Anita J. Borton 
Ryan P. Boyles 
Kristen N. Broadway 
William S. Bryant 
Enrico Budianto 
Jason P. Burton 
Michael J. Callahan 
Justin A. Chambers 
Robert B. Christian 
Timothy H. Colvin 
Colleen A. Coyle 
Steven W. Craft 
Laura C. Daughtry 
Jo Anna Eakin 
Marissa L. Earles 
Jason L. Elliott 
Michael A. Faoro 
Katherine E. Fielden 
Miles M. Fitch, III 
Carol A. Fuller 
Todd D. Fuller 
Jeffrey A. Gage 



Shirley M. Garoutte 
Michael H. Glasheen 
John F. Grebeta 
Stephanie K. Gregory 
S. Craig Hamrick 
Robert D. Hancock 
Misty L. Hankins 
Bernard C. Harberts 
Joel M. Hartman 
Courtney L. High 
Jennifer L. Hinson 
Heidi J. Hughes 
Jeffrey D. Jackson 
Li Jiang 

Jennifer M. Kilgore 
Melanie E. Kirk 
M. Walter Lane, II 
Christopher K. Lannon 
Zane I. Lapinskes 
William G. Leadbitter 
Wendy M. Lovelace 
Tammy K. Low 
Lianne Lowell 
William J. Lyerly 
Benjamin C. MacNeill 
Michael D. Madritch 
Elizabeth H. Maguire 
Molly H. McGaughey 
Dennis H. McNeill 
Matthew J. Morgan 
Christopher T. Mosley 
Mark A. Nippert 
Mark P. Nordberg 



Christopher A. Parham 
Akash A. Patel 
Dana L. Pearce 
David R Phillips 
Laura M, Pottmyer 
Mallory S, Price 
Phoebe A. Proffit 
Karen R Quinn 
Emily I. Richardson 
Wendy E. Rinaldi 
Jonathan C. Routh 
Cole L. Russing 
Edward M. Rutledge 
Jason B. Sandy 
Robert J. Schoderbek 
Kelly A. Sigmon 
Lisa J. Sitek 
Elizabeth A. Smith 
Christian S. Spruill 
Elizabeth M. Sutton 
Domenic J. Tiani 
Matthew B. Turner 
Jan E. Vandemeer 
Lara L. Venters 
Chaffee W. Viets 
Valerie J. Vonnoh 
Michael B. Wallace 
Aaron J. Ware 
Gillian N. Will 
April A. Wood 
Andrew M. Woods 
Heather M. Yandle 
Melissa A. Young 
Jennifer L. Zimmerman 



Frederick R. Ange, Jr. 
Bethany A. Bolt 
Michael E. Brady 
Kerry E. Buckley 
Crystal N. Carter 
Sonya M. Chauvin 
Sharon A. Chung 
Deborah E. Citrin 
Joseph A. Delgross 
John P. Denny 
Jayne K. Goodman 



INITIATED - 1995 

Erin S. Hancock 
Cerine M. Hill 
Heather E. Hughes 
Elizabeth K. Hunt 
Brandon A. Johnson 
Amy C. Langdon 
Faera 1. Ledford 
Christopher M. Lochmuller 
Philip W. Longest, Jr. 
Megan E. Mack 
Stephanie A. Manfredi 



Paulette H. Martin 
Henry C. McDade 
Richard L. Nuss 
Valerie I. Pai 
Kimberly R. Parks 
Thomas J. Pierce 
Autumn L. Stroupe 
Nathan P.Sutton 
Melanie L. Tew 
Kelly M. Tinga 



95 



PHI KAPPA PHI ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 

(4.0 and 100 NCSU Hours) 



Lori N. Adams 
Muqsit Ashraf 
Steven P. Bailey 
Anita J. Borton 
Eric N. Burcsu 
Chris L. Capps 
Holly A. Chandler 



Deborah E. Citrin 
Joseph A. Delgross 
Jason L. Elliott 
Katherine E. Fielden 
David B. Hill 
Stephanie A. Manfred! 
John C. O'Quinn 



Christopher A. Parham 
Akash A. Patel 
Nathan P. Sutton 
Melanie L. Tew 
Valerie J. Vonnoh 
Andrew M. Woods 



NATIONAL PHI KAPPA PHI FELLOWSHIP 



Nominee: John C. O'Quinn 
Honorable Mention: Erin M. Beebe 



GOLDEN CHAIN HONOR SOCIETY 

SENIORS 



Erin Michele Beebe 
James Robert Clagett 
Eileen Frances Duley 



Megan Elizabeth Jones 
Todd Douglas Fuller 
John Caviness O'Quinn 



Laura Marie Pottmyer 
Lee Taylor Roberts 
Catherine Michelle Rose 
Amy Joy Wazenegger 



ARMY ROTC COMMISSIONEES 

DECEMBER 1995 

Katina D. Geiger Fort Washington, MD 

Michael T. Parrish Durham 

Matthew G. Sayre Oveido, FL 

Robert C. Stokes South Vienna, OH 

MAY 1996 

Tracy K. Combs Southington, OH 

Dorothy L. Gay-Lord Greenville 

Christopher Kurinec Weare, NH 

Michael Moore ^^ 

Wayne O. Nitzschner Kingston, NY 

Mills T. Pruden Roxobel 

Joseph A. Simmons Ocean City, NJ 



96 



NAVY ROTC COMMISSIONEES 

DECEMBER 1995 

Allen Harper Frostburg, MD 

Daniel R. Ledford Siler City 

Brian E. Russell Manassas, VA 

Ladd W. Shepard Coventry, U.K. 

MAY 1996 

Ellis C. Brewer Warsaw 

Jonathan M. Butzke Gary 

Douglas A. Denney New Port 

Angela A. Fulton Holland, OH 

David T. Hart Morehead City 

McClellan B. Plihcik Greensboro 

Paul Rizzo Myrtle Beach, SC 

Richard E. Sessoms . Durham 

Frederick C. Whitney New Bern 

Thomas A. Zdunczyk Akron, OH 



AIR FORCE ROTC COMMISSIONEES 

DECEMBER 1995 

Mark J. Blackman . Southern Pines 

Dean J. Carter Mountain Rest, SC 

Bryan D. Kerns Spruce Pine 

MAY 1996 

Christian W. Barnes Salisbury 

Damon C. Butler Waldorf, MD 

Mary E. Duhan Angolia, NY 

Samuel B. Gardner Raleigh 

Marcia L. Kankelfritz Sanford 

Laura A. Kelly Sanford 

Timothy J. Moore Ellerbe 

Kristie L. Oxford Spotsylvania, VA 

Stacey N. Sweigard Charlotte 

Keely L. Taylor Morehead City 

Patrick C. Winstead Winterville 



97 



1996 GRADUATION 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



The following non-University organizations have contributed significantly to the 
success of our graduation exercises. 



Design and Implementation 
of Stage Backdrop: 



Mr. Frank Greathouse, Owner 
Realizations, Inc., Wilmington, NC 



Sound Systems: 

Mr. Wade C. Miller, Jr., Owner 
Sound Engineering, Greensboro, NC 



Floral Designs: 

Johnson-Paschal Floral Co., Inc. 
Raleigh, NC 



98 



Agricultural Institute 

College of Agriculture 
ana Life Sciences 




University Student Center 
North Carolina State University 

May 10, iggd 



AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 
GRADUATION EXERCISES 

May 10, 1996 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND LIFE SCIENCES 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 

Durward F. Bateman, Dean 

Presiding 

^PROCESSIONAL 

^INVOCATION Dr. James F. Ferry, Jr. 

Pastor, The First Presbyterian Church 
Gamer, NC 

ADDRESS Charles Thomas Wood 

Vice President, Retail Division I 
Southern States Cooperative 

AWARDING OF DIPLOMAS Durward F. Bateman, Dean 

James L. Oblinger 

Associate Dean and Director 

Academic Programs 

Jeffrey D. Armstrong 

Assistant Director of Academic Programs and 

Director of the Agricultural Institute 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES Larry K. Monteith 

Chancellor 
North Carolina State University 

MOVING OF THE TASSELS Class Valedictorians 

REMARKS Larry K. Monteith 

STUDENT COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER Josh Edward Allen 

^BENEDICTION 

♦RECESSIONAL 

Reception Immediately Following the Graduation Exercises. 

^Please Stand. 



AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 
GRADUATES 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 
IN AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

December 20, 1995 

t Charles Jody Britt Mt. Olive 

Christopher Dale Carroll Clayton 

t Donald Scott Deans Middlesex 

tH Mikell Blair Eddins Zebulon 

Jason Charles Schlappich Monroe 

HH Charles Nathan Veasey Durham 

May 10, 1996 

tH Josh Edward Allen Plymouth 

fHH Gregory Lee Batton Wilmington 

fH Judy Sanders Bridges Fuquay Varina 

H Roy Jennings Brown IV Clinton 

Tabatha Paulette Cox Kannapolis 

Ryan Scott King Princeton 

t Kevin Rene' Stinnett Durham 

H Jonathan Daniel Ward Hobbsville 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 
IN AGRICULTURAL PEST CONTROL 

December 20, 1995 

tH John Michael Clanton Liberty 

X Carl Graham Lamb II Ingold 



t Co-major H Honors 

J Agribusiness Concentration HH High Honors 



May 10, 1996 



William Jason Corbett Newton Grove 

Harry Kelton King Ash 

Brandon Oneal Richardson Williamston 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 
IN FIELD CROPS TECHNOLOGY 



December 20, 1995 



JH Joseph Basil Boyles King 

t Charles Jody Britt Mt. Olive 

tH John Michael Clanton Liberty 

tH Mikell Blair Eddins Zebulon 

Brian Keith Johnson Newton Grove 

Charles Bryan Kirk Knightdale 

t Thaddeus Pender Sharp IV Sims 

Alvin Randolph Shearin, Jr Wise 



May 10, 1996 



tH Josh Edward Allen Plymouth 

Preston Britt Alligood Washington 

Jeremy Bryan Darden Newton Grove 

Andrew Garrett Herring Dunn 

Brandon Lee Wilson Tarboro 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 

IN FOOD PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION, 

AND SERVICE 

December 20, 1995 

X Melanie Hartis Laurinburg 

JH Leia May Thornton Newton Grove 



t Co-major H Honors 

X Agribusiness Concentration HH High Honors 



May 10, 1996 

tH Judy Sanders Bridges Fuquay Varina 

J Wanda Michelle Harvey Apex 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 
IN GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

December 20, 1995 

t Donald Scott Deans Middlesex 

J Jason Wayland Gardner Lillington 

Clarence Lome Wiggins Corapeake 



May 10, 1996 



fH Josh Edward Allen Plymouth 

tHH Gregory Lee Batton Wilmington 

Christopher Lee Raynor Newton Grove 

H Marcus Ryan Stallings Hobbsville 

Hunter Stuart Taylor Gumberry 

Robert Thomas Wyant Vale 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 

IN LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 

DAIRY OPTION 



May 10, 1996 



t Robert Charles Davis Stony Point 

t Tina Yvonne Dixon Graham 



t Co-major H Honors ) 

X Agribusiness Concentration HH High Honors 4 

'< 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 
IN LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT AND 
TECHNOLOGY - GENERAL LIVESTOCK 
OPTION 



December 20, 1995 



Brett Alan Matthews Bunnlevel 

Roland Mack Phillips, Jr Bear Creek 

Ira LeRoy Witt Middlesex 



May 10, 1996 



J Benjamin Vaughan Coleman .... Sedalia, VA 

tHH Waylon Taft Cook Carthage 

t Robert Charles Davis Stony Point 

fH Aaron Lee Dodson Roseboro 

Cynthia Lynn Haynes Cary 

t JH Christopher Lee Hobbs Clinton 

H Ronald Dale Jarman Lilesville 

Kevin Wayne Lee Lilesville 

tJH Niles Neville Lucas Faison 

H Bryant Gibson Mason, Jr Statesville 

fH Michael Ryan Morgan Morven 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 
IN LFVESTOCK MANAGEMENT AND 
TECHNOLOGY - POULTRY OPTION 



December 20, 1995 



H Dyke Farrell Addis Olin 

X Martin Allen Loflin Bear Creek 



t Co-major H Honors 

X Agribusiness Concentration HH High Honors 



May 10, 1996 



tHH Waylon Taft Cook Carthage 

Chris Brian Goforth Statesville 

tJH Christopher Lee Hobbs Clinton 

tJH Niles Neville Lucas Faison 

Brannon Dale Preslar ' Bennett 

David Joel Reavis Harmony 

Andy Miller Smith Monroe 

t Kevin Rene' Stinnett Durham 

H George Phillip Williams Magnolia 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 

IN LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 

SWINE OPTION 



December 20, 1995 



fThaddeus Pender Sharp IV Sims 

X Allison Elizabeth Stallings .... Elizabethtown 



May 10, 1996 



H Bernard Clayton Baggett Newton Grove 

H Jeffrey Keith Bamhill Burgaw 

t Tina Yvonne Dixon Graham 

jH Aaron Lee Dodson Roseboro 

tJH Christopher Lee Hobbs Clinton 

Chad Lentz Lowder Albemarle 

ttH Niles Neville Lucas Faison 

fH Michael Ryan Morgan Morven 

Jeremy Scott Rouse Trenton 

Steven Lewis Rouse Seven Springs 

H Stuart Eugene Rouse Rose Hill 

H Olga Nicole Ruiz Mt. Olive 

Daniel Keith Waller Seven Springs h 

t Co-major H Honors ^ 

X Agribusiness Concentration HH High Honors * 

I 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 
IN ORNAMENTALS AND LANDSCAPE 
TECHNOLOGY 

December 20, 1995 

tj Burton Edward Ange, Jr Plymouth 

Michael Fuller Brainard Monroe 

fH John Michael Clanton Liberty 

tt Sean Wayne Cox Winston-Salem 

tt Matthew Stewart Fairfield Plymouth 

tt Darrin Christopher Hockstra Raleigh 

t Ethan Brian Lester Waynesville 

t Kevin Robert Lytle Indian Trail 

t Joseph Glen Magers Raleigh 

t Chris Allen Martin Arcadia 

John Chad Moose Mooresville 

James Ronald Robinson Greensboro 

tJH James Forrest Scruggs Clemmons 

fHH Richard Wayne Seagroves Wake Forest 

Jamie Michael Welch Lexington 



May 10, 1996 

Russ Milton Baucom Monroe 

HH Clifton Scott Braswell Spring Hope 

H Connie Ann Caldwell Charlotte 

HH Suzanne Denise Cox Asheboro 

Brian Michael Feezor Winston-Salem 

tJHH Michael Stephen Hartsell, Jr Concord 

tt Michael Shawn Hawkins Clemmons 

HH Curtis William Hogan Chapel Hill 

fH Charles Ryan Keams Lexington 

HH Regina Lacy Kinton Fuquay-Varina 

HH Jonathan Edward Smith Greenville 

Franklin Knute Snider Lexington 

Joshua Steven Sorrells Canton 

t Co-major H Honors 

X Agribusiness Concentration HH High Honors 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE 
IN TURFGRASS MANAGMENT 

December 20, 1995 

HHMichael Garrett Adams . . . Newport News, VA 

ft Burton Edward Ange, Jr Plymouth 

HHAnthony Conway Cheek Burlington 

Michael James Claybrook Stoneville 

ft Sean Wayne Cox Winston-Salem 

Philip Orrin Crabtree Durham 

JHH Ronald Brad Edens Kenansville 

Billy Dean Evans, Jr Stoneville 

tt Matthew Stewart Fairfield Plymouth 

J David John Fetsko Raleigh 

X Larry Bryan Hamilton Brevard 

H David Troy Helton Gastonia 

HH Jed Michael Hemenway Boonville, IN 

t J Darrin Christopher Hockstra Raleigh 

Jasen Kenneth Jenkins Winston-Salem 

{H Kristopher Layne Kees Nashville, TN 

HH Anthony Randall Kemp Boonville, IN 

Ryan Winfred Kimbro Durham 

HH Walter Dewayne Krege Banner Elk 

X Joseph Brent Leggett Nashville 

t Ethan Brian Lester Waynesville 

Brandon Leon Liles Gamer 

X Jeffrey Kent Liles Raleigh 

t Kevin Robert Lytle Indian Trail 

t Joseph Glen Magers Raleigh 

t Chris Allen Martin Arcadia 

HH Derek Lawrence Porter . . . Newport News, VA 

H Joseph Niram Ramsey Bumsville 

t JH James Forrest Scruggs Clemmons 

fHH Richard Wayne Seagroves Wake Forest 

Robert Michael Terry Jacksonville 

Joseph Brent Thomasee Kannapolis 



t Co-major H Honors 

X Agribusiness Concentration HH High Honors 



May 10, 1996 



Paul Mitchell Abemethy Lincolnton 

HH Anthony Vito Angelichio Vass 

{HH Paul Michael Brandenburg Greenville 

HH Keith Dwayne Bumell Greensboro 

Randall Jason Case Hendersonville 

HH Michael Collin Cavins Moline, IL 

HH James Daniel Chudy Raleigh 

H Harry Wayne Coble II Raleigh 

Mark Christopher Conlin CuUowhee 

H Phillip Dean Farlow Sophia 

Mark Jaison Godfrey Rockingham 

t JHH Michael Stephen Hartsell, Jr Concord 

t J Michael Shawn Hawkins Clemmons 

Stephen Noel Johnson Gastonia 

Thomas Wayne Jordan Erwin 

fH Charles Ryan Keams Lexington 

Mitchell Lee Mann Burlington 

JHH Raymond Kenneth Mann, Jr Jacksonville 

Lewis Preston Mills Monroe 

H Jason Patrick Myers Philipsburg, PA 

t Vance Moore Newlin Haw River 

}HH Andrew Winston Ninnemann . . Gambrills, MD 

Steven Barrett Overton Shiloh 

HH Mark Odell Owen Lexington 

Timothy Allen Patterson Lakeview 

Joseph Lynn Powell Cerro Gordo 

Brian Evert Ramsey Franklin 

Brad Landon Satterfield Burlington 

JHH Marc Edward Smith Williamsburg 

Robert Bryan Steed Greensboro 

t Kevin Rene' Stinnett Durham 

H Brently Aaron Ward Bakersville 

H Shannon Sanders Wheeler Raleigh 

Daniel Matthew Willis Bakersville 

Jason Daniel Wingate Sylva 

H Craig Alan Zeigler Durham 



t Co-major H Honors 

X Agribusiness Concentration HH High Honors 



Academic Honors 

Students with a grade point average of 3.00-3.49 
graduate with Honors. Students with a grade point 
average of 3.50-4.00 graduate with High Honors. 

Honor Sashes 

Students graduating with Honors are recognized w 
white sashes. Students graduating with High Hone 
are recognized with red sashes. 



Academic Costume 

Academic gowns represent a tradition handed down from the 
universities of the Middle Ages. These institutions were founded by 
the Church; the students, being clerics, were obliged to wear the 
prescribed gowns at all times. Round caps later became square 
mortarboards; the hoods, originally cowls attached to the gowns, could 
be slipped over the head for warmth. 

Many European universities have distinctive caps and gowns 
which are different from those commonly used in this country. Some 
of the gowns are of bright colors and some are embellished with fiir. 
A number of these may be noted in the procession. 

The usual color for academic gowns in the United States is 
black. The bachelor's gown is worn closed, the master's and doctor's 
may be worn open or closed. The shape of the sleeve is the 
distinguishing mark of the gown: bachelor—long pointed sleeves; 
master-oblong, square cut in the back with an arc away in front; 
doctor-bell shaped. 

Caps are black. The tassels for the Ph.D. degree are gold and 
those for other graduate and professional degrees may be of the color 
corresponding to the trimmings on the hoods. The color of the tassels 
for bachelor's degrees indicates the curriculum of the graduate: 
Agriculture, maize; Design, brown; Education, light blue; 
Engineering, orange; Forest Resource, russet; Liberal Arts, white; 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences, yellow; Textiles, wine red. 

Of all the components of the academic costume, the hood bears 
the heaviest symbolic burden. The hood must make clear the level of 
the degree, the faculty in which it was given, and the institution which 
awarded it. The level of the degree is shown by the size of the hood, 
the width of the velvet trimmings, and in the case of doctors, by the 
shape. The bachelor's, master's, and doctor's hoods are three feet, 
three and one-half feet, and four feet long respectively. The velvet 
trimming in the same order is two, three, and five inches and extends 
all around the hood on the exposed edge. This same trimming 
identifies the faculty. A partial list of the colors follows: Agriculture, 
maize; Architecture and Art, brown; Science, golden yellow; 
Economics, copper; Education, light blue; Engineering, orange; 
Forestry, russet; Physical Education, sage green; Religion, scarlet; 
Speech, silver gray; Veterinary Medicine, gray; Textiles, wine red. 
The following faculties have the same color-dark blue: Anthropology, 
History, Languages, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, 
Sociology. 




i 



CORRECTED COPY 



1996 Fall 

Graduation 

Exercises 

North Carolina State University 




Wednesday, December 1 8 
Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-Six 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Wednesday, December 1 8 
Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-Six 



This program is prepared for informational purposes only. The appearance of an 
individual's name does not constitute the University's acknowledgement, certification, or 
representation that the individual has fulfilled the requirements for a degree. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Musical Program iii 

Exercises of Graduation iv 

Dr. Jerry Punch v 

Dr. Prezell Russell Robinson vi 

Time and Location of Departmental Ceremonies vii 

ROTC Commissioning Ceremony ix 

Graduation Ushers x 

Graduation Marshals x 

The Alma Mater xi 

Academic Costume xii 

Academic Honors xii 

Undergraduate Degrees 1 

Graduate Degrees 50 

Master's Degrees 50 

Master of Arts Degrees 60 

Master of Science Degrees 61 

Doctor of Education Degrees 73 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 75 



Musical Program 

EXERCISES OF GRADUATION 

December 18, 1996 

British Brass Band Concert 8:30 a.m. 

English Folk Songs Suite Ralph Vaughan-Williams, arr. Wright 

Patterns (for Brass Band) Edward Gregson 

West Side Story Selections Leonard Bernstein, arr. Wright 

PROCESSIONAL: 9:00 a.m. 
Grand March Clare Grundman 

RECESSIONAL (Platform Party Only): 

Grand March Clare Grundman 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 

BRITISH BRASS BAND 

Dr. Robert B. Petters, Director 



111 



Exercises of Graduation 

Reynolds Coliseum 

Chancellor Larry K. Monteith 
Presiding 

December 18, 1996 

PROCESSIONAL, 9:00 am Dr. Robert B. Petters 

Director, North Carolina State University British Brass Band. 
The audience is requested to remain seated during the Processional 

WELCOME Chancellor Larry K. Monteith 

INVOCATION Rabbi Lucy Dinner 

Temple Beth Or 

NATIONAL ANTHEM Ms. Wanda Ramm 

INTRODUCTIONS Chancellor Monteith 

ADDRESS Dr. Jerry Punch 

CONFERRING OF HONORARY DEGREES Chancellor Monteith 

Dr. Prezell Russell Robinson Doctor of Humane Letters 
CONFERRING OF DEGREES Chancellor Monteith 

Candidates for advanced degrees presented by Dean of Graduate School Candidates for 
baccalaureate degrees presented by Deans of Colleges/Schools 

ADDRESS TO FELLOW GRADUATES Ms. Ghazale Sharifi-Mehr 

Class of 1996 

RECOGNITIONS Chancellor Monteith 

VALEDICTORIANS CLASS OF 1996 

Lori Nicole Adams Amy Cheryl Langdon 

Muqsit Ashraf Christopher Lochmuller 

Gavin Douglas Blosser Philip Worth Longest, Jr. 

Debra Renee Burch Deborah Ware Mettler 

Christopher Louis Capps Askash Arvind Patel 

Crystal Noel Carter Steven Carl Spruill 
Angela Marie Cheyunski 

TURNING OF THE TASSEL Ms. Ghazale Sharifi-Mehr 

ALMA MATER The Grains of Time 

RECESSIONAL (Platform Party only) 



IV 



Dr. Jerry Punch 




There are television sports reporters. And there are doctors. Dr. Jerry Punch 
is both. 

Until recently. Punch navigated between two hectic careers as a sports reporter 
for ESPN and ABC and as chief of staff of a Florida hospital and director of an 
emergency room. Occasionally, his dual interests merged: he sometimes stopped 
covering auto races so he could rush to help badly injured drivers such as Rusty 
Wallace and Don Marmor. 

Punch, 43, now concentrates on reporting full time. After 15 years in trauma 
medicine, he sold the emergency medicine group he used to run in Florida and works 
solely for ESPN and ABC, which are both Disney affiliates. 

Success has come steadily for Punch. He graduated magna cum laude from NC 
State University in 1975 before fmishing at Bowman Gray Medical School at Wake 
Forest University in 1979. He credits NC State with instilling in him the "relentless 
preparation" that shapes his work. Punch said his two best decisions in life were to 
marry his wife, Joni Fields Punch, and to attend NC State. 

A native of Newton, Punch brings a lifetime of loving sports to his profession. 
He was a mechanic and race car driver in high school and was a walk-on, back-up 
quarterback at NC State for Coach Lou Holtz. He got his start in the business 
announcing auto races on the weekends in medical school and eventually landed 
assignments with ESPN when he was a resident at a Daytona Beach hospital. 

He has been a pit reporter covering NASCAR Winston Cup races for ESPN 
since 1984 and has worked as a college football sideline reporter since 1989. He also 
hosts other motorsports events and has called play-by-play for college football, 
basketball and gymnastics. 

At the same time. Punch held down a demanding schedule as a doctor. Most 
recently, he was director of emergency room services at Memorial Hospital-Flagler 
in Burmell, Fla. 

In recognition of his accomplishments, NC State named him Outstanding 
Young Alumnus in 1989. The annual award honors graduates who are 35 or 
younger and have made the most contributions to their profession, community and 
university. 

He also was awarded the United States Air Force Outstanding Performance 
Award, which is given for exemplary service in the auto racing community, in 1989; 
was named NASCAR's Team Player of the Year in 1990; and was given the ARCA 
Motorsports Media Award in 1995. That award is presented to individuals or groups 
whose extra efforts have benefitted that motorsport series. 

Punch has four sons. He and his wife live in Cornelius with their 2 1/2 year-old 
daughter. 



Dr. Prezell Russell Robinson 




Dr. Prezell Russell Robinson is president emeritus of Saint Augustine's College 
where he is also Charles A. Mott Endowed Distinguished Professor of the Social 
Sciences. But Robinson's influence extends far beyond the Raleigh campus where 
he spent 28 years as the top administrator. He also has made an international imprint 
during his career. 

Robinson is serving for the second time as a U.S. Alternate Representative to 
the United Nations. He was first appointed by President Bush in 1992 and was 
appointed again by President Clinton this year. He also was selected by the 
Department of State to visit and lecture in six African countries in 1971 and was 
appointed by President Carter to serve on the U.S.-Liberian Commission in 1980. 

Robinson, who was bom in Batesburg, S.C, graduated from Voorhees School 
and Junior College in Denmark, S.C, before earning a bachelor's degree in 
economics and social science from Saint Augustine's. He earned master's and 
doctoral degrees in rural education and rural sociology-economics from Cornell 
University. 

He was a dean and sociology professor at Saint Augustine's between 1956 and 
1964, was appointed executive dean and professor in 1964 and was named acting 
president in June 1966. He became president and a professor of sociology eight 
months later. 

Robinson has earned recognition throughout his career, both as a faculty 
member and an administrator. He was voted one of three outstanding teachers at 
Saint Augustine's in 1961-62, was awarded a U.S. Fulbright Fellowship to India in 
1965 and was selected one of 20 college presidents in the "100 Most Effective 
Presidents of America" in 1986. Robinson has received 1 1 honorary degrees. 

Robinson has a long history of involvement in the Raleigh community. He is 
active in the Episcopal Church, at the parish, diocesan and national levels. In 
addition, Robinson is vice chairman of the North Carolina State Board of Education 
and has served on numerous academic and community organizations. They include: 
the executive committee of the International Association of University Presidents; 
the board of directors of The Episcopal Church Foundation; the Association of 
Southern Colleges and Universities, of which he was president in 1974-75; the 
executive committee of the United Negro College Fund, of which he was president 
and a member from 1 978 to 1 98 1 ; the National Association for Equal Opportunity 
in Higher Education, of which he was president from 1982 to 1985; the Association 
of Episcopal Colleges, of which he was president from 1989 to 1994; the board of 
directors of The Episcopal Church Pension Fund, on which he has served since 
1985; and the board of trustees of Peace College in Raleigh and of Voorhees 
College. 

Robinson, who lives in Raleigh, retired in 1995. He and his wife, Lulu, have 
one daughter. 



VI 



Time and Location of College 
and Departmental Ceremonies 



College of Agriculture and Life Sciences - 11 :30 a.m. 

Agricultural Business Management 225 Nelson Hall 

Agricultural and Extension Education 2 Ricks Hall 

Agronomy, Conservation, Crop, and Soil Science 2215 Williams Hall 

Animal Science McKimmon Center 

Biochemistry 1404 Williams Hall 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 158 Weaver Laboratories 

Biological Sciences 2722 Bostian Hall 

Biological Sciences Major Microbiology 

Botany Nutrition 

Ecology Plant Pathology 

Entomology Toxicology 
Genetics 

Environmental Sciences Location of Major Faculty Advisor 

Food Science 105 Schaub Hall 

Horticultural Science 159 Kilgore Hall 

Natural Resources Location of Major Faculty Advisor 

Physiology Program Location of Major Faculty Advisor 

Poultry Science 106 Scott Hall 

Applied Sociology 218 Withers Hall 

Zoology 3712 Bostian Hall 

Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences 
Medical Technology 
Zoology Majors 

School of Design - 3:00 p.m Stewart Theatre 

Coffee & Dessert - 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m Brooks Hall Gallery 

College of Education and Psychology - 1 1:30 am McKimmon Center, 

Western Boulevard 

College of Engineering - 1 1 :30 a.m. 

Aerospace Engineering Cinema, University Student Center Annex 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 158 Weaver Laboratories 

Chemical Engineering II Riddick Laboratories 

Civil Engineering 240 Nelson Hall Auditorium 

Computer Science Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, 

1801 Hillsborough Street 

Electrical and Computer Engineering Stewart Theatre, 

University Student Center 

Industrial Engineering Ephesus Baptist Church, 

6767 Hillsborough Street 



Vll 



Inti'grated Manufacturing Systems Engineering 117 Park Shops 

Maiter of Engineering 117 Park Shops 

Materials Science and Engineering 234 Riddick Laboratories 

Mechanical Engineering Cinema, University Student Center Annex 

Nuclear Engineering 1202 Burlington Laboratories 



College of Forest Resources - 1 1 :30 a.m McKimmon Center, 

Western Boulevard 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences - 1 1 :30 a.m. except for those marked with an 

asterisk 
Communication Memorial Auditorium 

♦ English - 1:30 Fairmont United Methodist Church, 

2501 Clark Avenue 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 3118 University Student Center 

History 107 Harrelson Hall 

♦ Multidisciplinary Studies - 1 :30 Fairmont United Methodist Church, 

2501 Clark Avenue 

Philosophy and Religion 3118 University Student Center 

Political Science and Public Administration 216 Poe Hall 

Social Work Forest Hills Baptist Church, 

31 10 Clark Avenue 
Sociology and Anthropology 218 Withers Hall 

College of Management - 1 1:30 a.m. 

Accounting Reynolds Coliseum 

Business Management Reynolds Coliseum 

Economics Reynolds Coliseum 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences - 1 1:30 a.m. 

Chemistry 124 Dabney Hall 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 2010 Biltmore Hall 

Mathematics 207 Hanelson Hall 

Physics 206 Cox Hall 

Statistics Roosevelt Room, Brownestone Hotel, 

1707 Hillsborough Street 

College of Textiles - 1 1:30 am W. Duke Kimbrell Atrium, 

Centennial Textiles Complex 
Reception - Immediately following departmental ceremony. . Convocation Center, 

Centennial Textiles Complex 



Vlll 



ROTC COMMISSIONING 
CEREMONY 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL JOHN F. MCINERNEY 
Presiding 

University Student Center Ballroom 
18 December 1996 

PROCESSIONAL MARCH, 4:00 p.m Dr. Robert B. Petters 

Director. North Carolina State University British Brass Band 

POSTING OF THE COLORS Multi-Service Color Guard 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

INVOCATION Reverend Phillip Wiehe 

WELCOME Dr. Larry K. Monteith 

Chancellor 

INTRODUCTIONS Lieutenant Colonel John F. Mclnemey 

Military Science 

ADDRESS Brigadier General Maxwell C. Bailey 

Commander, 2nd Air Force, Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE OATH 

OF OFFICE Captain Richard J. Field 

Professor of Naval Science 

Colonel Robert H. Penny 
Professor of Aerospace Studies 

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES Dr. Lany K. Monteith 

Brigadier General Maxwell C. Bailey 

BENEDICTION Reverend Phillip Wiehe 

RETIRING OF THE COLORS Multi-Service Color Guard 

RECESSIONAL North Carolina State University British Brass Band 

The audience is requested to remain sealed imlil the Recessional music is completed. 



IX 



Graduation Ushers 



Air Force ROTC Ushers Nav7 ROTC Ushers 



Christopher Autry 
James Chambers 
Dustin Keck 
Robert Lackey 
John McClung 
Steven Shearin 
Steven Storms 
J. C. Strickland, Jr. 
Andrew White 
Heather Wyss 



Spencer Anderson 
William Capone 
Benjamin Caricofe 
Kevin Crow 
Jereal Dorsey 
Matthew Foster 
Chapin Hough 
Eugene Reynolds 
John Scorzello 
Seth Stallings 



Army ROTC Users 

Donald Buffoni 
Scott Carter 
Christopher Culpepper 
Timothy Duggan 
Edward Gomez 
Rebekah Gunn 
Jason MacKenzie 
Robert McCracken 



Graduation Marshals 



Mark D. Anthony 
Matthew K. Boone 
Jeremy S. Bordeaux 
Corrie R. Camalier 
Jenny C. Chang 
Felton S. Dengler, IV 
Kent P. Dezendorf 
Marshal K. Eagle 
Kelly J. Fairchild 
Patricia M. Festin 
S. Michelle Garoutte 
Stephen E. Garrett 



Tiffany R. Goins 
J. Zachariah Hall, II 
David R. Higgins 
Melani Hix 
Steven E. Hughes 
P. Michael Juby, Jr. 
Aaron J. Kalarovich 
Erik O. Lie-Nielsen 
Matthew T. Lisi 
Abee C. Lowman 
Sybil L. MacDonaid 
William J. Mitchell 



Chad Myers 

Emily N. O'Quinn 

M. Claire Pittman 

Mary C. Pollard 

Heather E. Reidinger 

James A. Reinke 

Aimee D. Smart 

Bryan H. Stypmann 

Jacob Gerald Vanden Bosch 

Tracey M. Westbrook 

Catherine E. Wilfong 



The Alma Mater 



Words by: Music by: 

ALVIN M. FOUNTAIN, '23 BONNIE F. NORRIS, JR., '23 



Where the winds of Dixie softly blow 
o'er the fields of Caroline, 



There stands ever cherished N.C. State, 
as thy honored shrine. 



So lift your voices; Loudly sing 
from hill to oceanside! 



Our hearts ever hold you, N.C. State 
in the folds of our love and pride. 



XI 



Academic Costume 

Academic gowns represent a tradition handed down from the universities of the Middle 
Ages. These institutions were founded by the Church; the students, being clerics, were 
obliged to wear the prescribed gowns at all times. Round caps later became square 
mortarboards; the hoods, originally cowls attached to the gowns, could be slipped over the 
head for warmth. 

Many European universities have distinctive caps and gowns which are different from 
those commonly used in this country. Some of the gowns are of bright colors and some are 
embellished with ftir. A number of these may be noted in the procession. 

The usual color for academic gowns in the United States is black. The bachelor's gown 
is worn closed, the master's and doctor's may be worn open or closed. The shape of the 
sleeve is the distinguishing mark of the gown: bachelor-long pointed sleeves; master- 
oblong, square cut in the back with an arc cut away in front; doctor-bell shaped. 

Caps are black. The tassels for the Ph.D. degree are gold and those for other graduate 
and professional degrees may be of the color corresponding to the trimmings on the hoods. 

Of all the components of the academic costume, the hood bears the heaviest symbolic 
burden. The hood must make clear the level of the degree, the faculty in which it was 
given, and the institution which awarded it. The level of the degree is shown by the size 
of the hood, the width of the velvet trimming, and in the case of doctors, by the shape. The 
bachelor's, master's, and doctor's hoods are three feet, three and one-half feet, and four feet 
long, respectively. The velvet trimming in the same order is two, three, and five inches and 
extends all around the hood on the exposed edge. This same trimming identifies the faculty 
in which the degree was awarded. For each faculty there is a corresponding color; so a 
glance at the trimming is all that is needed to identify the faculty. A partial list of the 
colors follows. Agriculture, maize; Architecture and Art, brown; Science, golden yellow; 
Economics, copper; Education, light blue; Engineering, orange; Forestry, russet; Physical 
Education, sage green; Religion, scarlet; Speech, silver gray; Veterinary Medicine, gray; 
Textiles, wine red. The following faculties have the same color-dark blue: Anthropology, 
History, Languages, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology. 

Academic Honors 



Honors participants benefit from a more individualized and rigorous approach to their 
desired degree through special classes, seminars and individual research. 

Undergraduate degree honor designations are: 

Cum Laude-for GPA 3.250 through 3.499 (white sash) 
Magna Cum Laude-for GPA 3.500 through 3.749 (red sash) 
Summa Cum Laude-for GPA 3.750 and above (gold sash) 



Xll 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 



College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

David McKinley Stein, Jr Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

*** David Spruill Anderson Rocky Mount 

Channin Hyde Bennett Raleigh 

Sandra Kay Cartwright Winston-Salem 

Susan Louise Cauley Kinston 

S*** Wendy Michelle Lovelace Lawndale 

Charles Worth McCormick Fairmont 

Brian Matthew Simpson Marshville 

Katherine Nicole Starrette Currituck 

Rachel Ann VanBenthuysen Cary 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

Degree Conferred June 25, 1 996 

Dermott John Cooke Cleveland, OH 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

John Walter Dettelbach Hickory 



+Co-majof H Honors Program SUohenity ScholArs Program 

■CumUKidc * 'Magna Cum Laudc '"SummaCiun Laude 



Stephen Forrest Morton Reidsville 

*♦♦ Roger Alan Serrette Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSERVATION 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Forest Resources. 

Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

John Tamp Bandy Conover 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 
Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

James Latman Lamb Clinton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Brett Clifford Paulsen Eden 

Mehul Mahesh Shah Winston-Salem 

Jerome Edward Smith Oxford 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

Ronnie Keyleen Hill, Jr Temple, TX 

Michael Joseph Rubish Columbiana, OH 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Heidi Lee Blount Plymouth 

James Andrew Boaz Yanceyville 

Thomas Allen Cook Bakersville 

John Raymond Donovan Marlboro, NY 

John Allen Jacobs Statesville 

Mark Wilson Lassiter Four Oaks 

Robert Craven Millican Fuquay-Varina 

Tyler David Mitchell Taylorsville 

Raphael Caleb Parker Clinton, MD 

+ Shane Philip Poplin Albermarle 

Mary Catherine Powell Raleigh 

Thomas Wyatt Richardson Nakina 

Curtis Edward Solomon Fuquay-Varina 

Webb Allen White Roanoke Rapids 

Lori Ann Wilson Brevard 

Ronald Corbett Wood Benson 

Nathan Banelt Wright Greenville 



tCo-major H Honors Program S Uoherat) Scholan Program 

'CumLaude **MagnaCiunL.3ude '"Summa Cum Laudc 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

Larry Brian Jenkins Deep Run 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 
Degree Con/erred December 18, 1996 

Derek Lee McLamb Roseboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRONOMY 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Jonathan Richard Bender Norlina 

James Wesley Caddeil Carthage 

Durwood Travis Gardner Smithfieid 

Sheila Joanne Hughes Durham 

Timothy David Mack Wilmington 

Steve Wayne Money, Jr Kemersviile 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1 996 

Michael Adrian Johnson Statesville 

Lee Alan Menius Salisbury 

Rebecca Gail Weaver Hudson 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

Karen Michelle Carter Kansas City, MO 

Bruce Wayne McBride, Jr Concord 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Kimberly Ann Boutin Raleigh 

Ronald Derek Brown Rose Hill 

Teresa Rene6 Bryant Zebulon 

♦* Kristin Ann Carbine Rutland, VT 

Timothy Paul Dollyhite Mount Airy 

* Kevin E)onald Hardison Benson 

* Craig Allen Harris Hudson 

Amy Michele Hawiey Raleigh 

Christopher Scott Jolly Maysville 

+** Regina Carol Linville Madison 

* Kelly Kathleen Meador Apex 

Mark Edward Mills Peachland 

William Thomas Oliver Wendell 

Sylvia Pete Poulos Atlanta, GA 

Angela Christine Rogers Mill Spring 



■HTo-major H Honon Prognni S Unh enity Sdiolan Program 

'CumLaude ••Magna Cum Loudc •••SumnuCumLaudc 

3 



♦♦ Shawntel Monique Sechrist Denver 

John Daniel Shevock Durham 

Yvonne Anne Stroupe Indian Trail 

Amy Dawn Wlodkowski Pittsfield, MA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY 

Degree Conferred June 25, 1996 

* Elizabeth Denise Roberts Gamer 

Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

Fletcher Marvin Edens Salisbury 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOCHEMISTRY 
Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

Marcia Celeste Canoll Boomer 

H** James Edward Corcoran Charlotte 

*** Sharon Monk Eliedge Lillington 

Jonathan Brett Morgan Wilmington 

+ Katherine Mary Rouse Vienna, VA 

Karen Elizabeth Twiford Rocky Mount 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Jimmy Lane Allgood, Jr Henderson 

S* Jill Marie Barker Raleigh 

Benjamin Todd Campbell Raleigh 

S+*** Crystal NOel Carter Linden 

+♦ Robert Glenn Coon Charleston, SC 

Wendelin Nicole Dixon Greenville 

+ Shera Rebecca Forrester Gastonia 

+ Stephanie Dale Hamley High Point 

Timmy Ray Hatley Albemarle 

+** Derek Adrian Hauser Wake Forest 

+ Thuha Thi Hoang Apex 

John Daniel Kelly Plymouth 

+* Yangchong Kue Morganton 

+♦* Regina Carol Linville Madison 

+ Mariana Marchi Molina Raleigh 

Heather Blue Nelson Fayetteville 

Brian Keith Newcomb Walstonburg 

Scott Alan Northrup Rural Hall 

♦♦ Christy Violet Perry Gamer 

S+*** Christopher Britt Peterson Pisgah Forest 

*♦♦ David Russell Phillips Gamer 

HS*** Angela Teresa Racine Cary 

+*♦♦ Kelly Anne Sigmon Hickory 

+ Cynthia Lucille Sparrow Wilmington 

HS*** Steven Carl Spruill Lucama 



+Co-niajor H Hooon Program S Unhtraty Scbolan Program 

•Cum Laude •♦Magna Cum Laud* •••Summa Cum Laude 

4 



♦♦♦ Jerry Tracy StaJey Greensboro 

Kevin Gerard Sullivan Hopatcong, NJ 

Timothy Allen Sullivan Raleigh 

+*** Kimberly Lynne Whitehead Durham 

Wendy Kathrine Wortham Brownsville, TN 

Lawrence Wonsik Yoon Toronto, Canada 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

* Jamie Scott Crowder Maiden 

Ronald Craig Smith Durham 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

* Derrick Carl Blackmon Burlington 

Michael Lee Brooks Winston-Salem 

Joanna Elizabeth Long Stone Mountain, GA 

Kathy Ann Woolever Ravenswood, WV 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

H*** Gavin Douglas Blosser Dillwyn, VA 

Betsy Hau Cao Raleigh 

S+*** Crystal NOel Carter Linden 

Mary Catherine Conklin Chesapeake, VA 

Bryan James Conner Wayne, PA 

Scott Clifford Dennis Raleigh 

+ Patrick Richard Haikal Raleigh 

Derik Michael Hinz Victor, NY 

William Eugene Johnson FV Harrells 

Jason Michael Kopp Hickory 

Matthew Calvin Larson Lyons, CO 

John William Matthews Louisburg 

Andreas OTJeal Belhaven 

Suzanne Vann Robinson Henderson 

Brian Kenneth Rose Greenville 

Lauren Nicole Shryock Baltimore, MD 

+ Cynthia Lucille Sparrow Wilmington 

Shellie Delaine St. Jean Nashville, TN 

Emily Elizabeth Stames Taylorsville 

Cynthia Ann Stroupe Charlotte 

Billy Orvis Watkins, Jr Richlands 

*** April Ann Wood Clayton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BOTANY 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

Brian Lee Ridenhour Murphy 



KTo-major H Hooon Pregmn S Unh ershy Sdiolan Pn>gnm 

•Cum Laud* ■•Magna Cum Laudc •••Summa Cum Laude 

5 



Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

Leigh Anne Weitzenfeld Floyd, VA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 
Degree Cort/erred December 18, 1996 

Tanner Edward Holland Lumberton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES 
Degree Conferred June 25, 1996 

Ronald McArthur Smith 11 Chesnee, SC 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Christine Marie Alvarez Shadyside, OH 

Rachelle Lyn Beauregard Raleigh 

Jeffrey Neel Burleson Lumberton 

Wilbur Emmett Carawan Hyde County 

♦ Thomas Matthew Cardwell Mayodan 

Gary Harold Egbert Voorhees, NJ 

♦ Shawn Paul Hopson Knotts Island 

♦ Brent Neai Lineberger Raleigh 

Bonnie Erin McNally Concord 

Mitchell Alan Morton Mouth Of Wilson, VA 

Derek Dwayne Murry Lee Center, NY 

Ronald Jason Satterwhite Granite Falls 

James Michael Sutton Raleigh 

Brenda Gail Tyner Carthage 

Ray Harding Williams III Sneads Ferry 

♦ Elizabeth Sato Workman Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FOOD SCIENCE 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

Jennifer Royster Pruitt Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Cheri6 Lynn Armstrong Jupiter, FL 

♦* Tiffany Marie Ashbum Waterford, VA 

Lia Michele Goeller Hickory 

+ Gregory Paul Hemdon Wilson 

+ Douglas Heath LaFevers Glen Alpine 

♦ Zack Smokey Steele Hickory 

Shannon Marie Teague Advance 



HTo-major H Honon Program S Unhosit)' Scfaobn Program 

*CumL3udc "Magna Cum Laude ***SummaC\unLaude 

6 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

Degree Conferred August 8. 1996 

Natalie Jill Dunn Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

*** Jay Stephen Aime Raleigh 

Patrick Lee Dabbs Fayetteville 

Brian Douglas Dunn Charlotte 

Rudolph John Eisenzopf III Glen Bumie, MD 

Brian Curtis Elledge Hickory 

Bonnie Denise Faulkner Kinston 

Brian Matthew Free High Point 

Jennifer Leigh Hamran Trenton, NJ 

Terrel Wayne Knutson Wake Forest 

Robert Jay Markley Clyde 

*♦ Benjamin Waveriy Mclver Durham 

Brian Lewis Morrison Elkins, WV 

* Gerard Joseph Nieters Morganton 

+ Shane Philip Poplin Albermarle 

Deborah Marie Rummel Leesburg, VA 

♦ Ted Bryan Sanderson Spring Hope 

Dustin Trent Swain Walkertown 

♦** Ann Marie Campbell Waller Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Lisa Marie Berlanga Fayetteville 

♦ William George Knapp Cary 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

* Anna Yuri Hicks Charlotte 

* Michelle Marlene Netto Willow Springs 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MICROBIOLOGY 

Degree Conferred June 25, 1996 

♦ Leena Rajendra Dave Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

Cheryl Woody Brame Henderson 

*♦ Elisa Cellar Newkirk Four Oaks 

Degrees Conferred December 18. 1996 

♦♦♦ Stefanie Diane Brock Hof West, West Germany 



+Co-nujof H Honon PiDgnm S Utiheral) Sdwlan Program 

*CumLaudc **MagDa Ciun L^ude ***Sumiiij Cujn Laudc 

7 



Dana Nicole Capps Charlotte 

Denise Dunn Charlotte 

+ Patrick Richard Haiical Raleigh 

+ Gregory Paul Hemdon Wilson 

+ Jennifer Leigh Lett Wantagh, NY 

Patrick Joseph Nadol Mooresville 

Christy Ann Smith Albemarle 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL RESOURCES 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Brian Alton Batten Selma 

* Jennifer Morris Chambers Reidsville 

Kathleen Diane Hoban Wilmington 

♦ Samuel Ashley Rollans Salisbury 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

Degree Conferred June 25, 1996 

+ Eric Martin King Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

Ted Hall Lankford North Wilkesboro 

Chad Jonathan Larson Sargeant, MN 

Jason Frederick Stroude Hays 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Laura Diane Cain Turkey 

+ Douglas Heath LaFevers Glen Alpine 

Mary Carol Stephenson Coats 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ZOOLOGY 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

* James Michael Edmundson Wilmington 

Shavale Lee Godwin Lumberton 

♦♦* Christopher Michael Lochmuller Durham 

♦♦ Karen Faye Stanaland Calabash 

Kimberly Lane Tabor Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

William Maxwell Carpenter Asheville 

Gina Leigh Collins Jacksonville 

Stephanie Diane Cordle Gastonia 

Kuan Jamel Gethers Bronx, NY 

Amanda Jane Huffman Virginia Beach, VA 

Benjamin Douglas Mcintosh, Jr Spotsylvania, VA 



+Co-majof H Honon Progiam S Unhersity SdwUn Program 

•Cum Laud« ♦•Magna Cum Laude •••Summa Cum Laude 



+ Chiga Miyake Akechi-Cyoun, Japan 

Vikram Vasudev Mohip Wilmington 

* Christina Ann Morgan Raleigh 

♦♦* Kimberly Rae Parks Morganton 

JoAnna Lynn Perry Wilson 

Benjamin Daniel Schramm Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Angela Amedee Abel Franklin 

Courtney Kamil Amaker Winston-Salem 

♦♦♦ Laura Minwer Badwan Raleigh 

Sara Griffin Brewen Kannapolis 

Stephanie Jane Britt Gamer 

* Jennifer Lynne Brock Columbia, MD 

*** Mary Catherine Bruton Raleigh 

Melissa Dudero Buan Easton, CT 

Kristin Amanda Buckley Scotch Plains, NJ 

**♦ Debra Renee Burch Matthews 

*♦ Michelle Deneen Calkins Durham 

Mickael Jeffrey Cariveau Middlesex 

Tamyra Tant Carpenter Bailey 

*** Angela Marie Cheyunski Raleigh 

*♦ David Husslar Cline IV Elkin 

+♦ Robert Glenn Coon Charleston, SC 

* Leah Paige Crawford Huntersville 

*** Brigette Diane Flythe Raleigh 

Gregory Scott Prey Louisville, KY 

♦** Jeffrey Andrew Gage Chapel Hill 

Jennifer Marie Ganett Medford, NJ 

S** James Perrin Hammond III Charlotte 

+** Derek Adrian Hauser Wake Forest 

George Cuthbert Heyward Raleigh 

* Carolyn Renea Hubbard Fayetteville 

Teshor Lashon Jones Goldsboro 

Anil Francis Joy Raleigh 

Satya Pratap Karamchandani Raleigh 

•♦* Melanie Eileen Kirk Durham 

*** Sherry Shirley Knouse Youngsville 

Kerrie Lane Knowles Sneads Ferry 

+* Yangchong Kue Morganton 

* Stacey Michelle Lawrence Como 

Christopher David Laxton Wake Forest 

+ Jennifer Leigh Lett Wantagh, NY 

Audra Lynn MacAulay Raleigh 

Jason Arthur Malphurs Raleigh 

* Alice Thomas Meyer Raleigh 

* Sheri Lynn Oswald Woodland Hills, CA 

Lara Adrienne Reid Whitsett 

+* Gregory Paul Richmond Charlotte 

David Anthony Sabio Raleigh 

Jonathan Patrick Scoggins Rocky Mount 

Jewel Lynette Scott Raleigh 



H Honors Pmgnm S Unh enity SdioUn Program 

*'Mjgiu Cum Ljude •••Summa Cum Laudc 



Elizabeth Vick Sloan Raleigh 

♦♦ Claire Elizabeth Smith Raleigh 

*♦* Christian Suzanne Spruill Greensboro 

Brian Keith Tolley Smithfield, VA 

Chukwuma Ukata Raleigh 

Heather Diane Warrender Morehead City 

Michael David Whitley New Bern 

Alena Susann Wirt Cary 



School of Design 



■ ; ■ : ■ — ^ 



BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE 

Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

* David Christopher Sledge Norlina 

BACHELOR OF ART AND DESIGN 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

** Amanda Kyle Davis Hopkinsville, KY 

Jenifer Marie Padilla Chapel Hill 

+** Kirsten Uta Schambra Chapel Hill 

S**^ Frederic Welterlin Cary 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

** Emerson Tay Ong Metuchen, NJ 

Matthew Douglas Starr Rocky Mount 

* Angela Caroline Waters Morganton 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE 

Degree Conferred June 25, 1 996 

* Wakako Tokunaga Tokyo, Japan 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

Jock deBoer New Orleans, LA 

Leslie Edward Linsmier Raleigh 

+ Robin Allison Taylor Charlotte 



-KTo-major H Honon Program S Unn eniiy ScfaoUn Program 

'CumLaudc ••Magna Cum Lau<k •••SummaCum Laude 

10 



Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

** Mindi Lea Brown Anniston, AL 

* Shawn Patrick Corbin Gatesville 

* Philip John Dagostino Mooresville 

Michelle Lynette Degruy Wake Forest 

* Jose Maria Gonzalez Madrid, Spain 

*♦ Soo Zee Park Wilmington 

* Shannon Ronn Rushing Monroe 

* Ginger Renee Stancil Angier 

* Nicole Marie Stames Monroe 

** Ann Celeste Waid Concord 

+ Richard Allen Woodland Chapel Hill 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN GRAPHIC DESIGN 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1 996 

Jonathan Michael Gerler Raleigh 

Kendra DeSean Williams Waynesboro, VA 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

** Tiffany Rishelle Miller Goldsboro 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

* William Lee Cherry Fayetteville 

* Maria Veronica Frontado Caracas, Venezuela 

+ Robin Allison Taylor Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

** Steven John Megesi Novi, MI 

BACHELOR OF GRAPHIC DESIGN 
Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

* Danielle Jeanine Anthony Purlear 

Keili Holland Holmes Raleigh 

+ Kimberly Anne Homer Jamestown 

* Gregory Ryan Melrath Oxford, PA 

Cheryl Potter Mills Raleigh 



-KTo-major H Honon Program S Urmtrsil> Scholin Progrun 

'CumLaude ''Magna Cum Liude ***S<unjna Cum Laudc 

II 



BACHELOR OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

* Dorje Seattle Bellbrook Pfafflown 

Bryan Sean Covington Charlotte 

+ Kimberly Anne Homer Jamestown 

Michael Curtis McGraw Warren, PA 

John William Peele High Point 

+** Kirsten Uta Schambra Chapel Hill 

Randolph Gerhard Schiener Wilmington 

+ Richard Allen Woodland Chapel Hill 

BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

Dennis Charles Teny Mooresboro 



College of Education and Psychology 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Lee Joseph Andron Raleigh 

Jon Thomas Fields Wilmington 

* Jennifer Anne Greene Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

* Marsha Dawn Bailey Caiy 

♦ Rebecca Brantley Collins Zebulon 

♦*♦ Anda Lynn Com Smith Durham 

** Amy Lynn Kay Knightdale 

Amy Marie Lamneck Apex 

** Nicole Marie Omiatek Horseheads, NY 

Mary Jo Robertson Raleigh 

Amy Denise Sills Marion 

Xavier Antoine Tondeur Chapel Hill 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Robert Ward Angley Morganton 

♦ Susan Ann Bagwell Asheville 

* Karen Danees Bamette Stanley 

** Thomas Allen Beam Raleigh 

♦ Eileen Marie Bomstein Bethesda, MD 



+Co-inajof H Hooon Prograni S Unhait) SchoUn Program 

'CumLaudc ••Magna Cum Laude •••Summa Cum Laud* 

12 




♦♦♦ Julie Baxter Bradbum Raleigh 

Melissa Lynn Chamberlin Hillsborough 

Corey Dale Chenoweth Port Jefferson, NY 

♦♦ Denise Margaret Curtis Belleville, IL 

* Meghan Kathleen Denny Raleigh 

** Kelly Lynn Drake Raleigh 

Teresa Diane Grimes Cary 

David Howell Hart Oxford 

Richard Ernest Hicks Raleigh 

Willie Dallas Jacobs Burgaw 

* Erik Michael Johnson Salisbury 

♦*♦ Cynthia Elizabeth Killough Raleigh 

Timika Telitia Little Newport 

♦♦♦ Debra Poteat Lucas Wake Forest 

HS*** Lori Rene6 McDowell Stella 

* Laura Margaret McGovem Raleigh 

S+* Richard Ernest Meams, Jr Greensboro 

♦♦♦ Deborah Ware Mettler Fuquay-Varina 

Ross Nicholson Miller Cary 

+ Chiga Miyake Akechi-Cyoun, Japan 

* Adrienne Christine Murrell Greenville 

Christie Ann Patterson Broadway 

Patricia Irene Patterson Raleigh 

* Janet Carol Perry Windsor 

Charlie Elias Quick 11 Raleigh 

Jennifer Carol Teachey Greensboro 

Talesha Ayana Wagner Virginia Beach, VA 

Melanie Anne Webb Pokomoke City, MD 

H*** Gillian Norton Will Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
Education, General Studies 

Degree Conferred June 25, J 996 

* Leslie Thaggard Lawrence Raleigh 

Degrees Con/erred December 18, 1996 

Mary Katherine Rissmiller Greensboro 

Tonya Lavette Scott Enfield 

Health Occupations, Teacher Education 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

** Michelle Russell Barker Raleigh 

♦** Linda Joy Blake Rolesville 

* Shelby Scott Chadwick Burgaw 

JoAnn Foye Gamer 

*** Mary Margaret Vicente Raleigh 



KTo-raajor H Hooo« Prograin S Unrversity SchoUn Program 

*Cum Laude • 'Magna Cum Laud c •••SummaCum Laudc 

13 



Language Arts and Social Studies, Middle Grades 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

** Karia Susan Boldt Gary 

♦ Rhonda Bowes Clayton Roxboro 

* James Allen White Zebulon 

Mathematics Education 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Benjamin Wayne Jones Winston-Salem 

Mary Jacquenette Jones Wilson Mills 

Beatrice B. Lyons Tarboro 

♦ Christopher John Remaley Gamer 

Stephanie Elizabeth Watson Kenly 

Mathematics Education, Middle Grades 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Johmar Lavon Baninger Winston-Salem 

Victoria Leeds Cooper Medford, NJ 

Gertrude Lyons Tarboro 

Mathematics and Science, Middle Grades 

Degree Con/erred June 25, 1996 

Wayne Leon Williams Henderson 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Kimberii Dawn Adams Raleigh 

** Susan Hunt Baker Raleigh 

Andrea Dale Dobbins High Point 

Christophe Anderson Huestis New Bern 

David Andrew Wilder Gastonia 

Science Education 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

Kimberly Anne Williams Southern Pines 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

* Stacy Leigh Allred Winston-Salem 

*♦* Scott Edward Caudill Oakton, VA 

*♦♦ Susan Lara Eure Clayton 

**♦ Courtney Lynne High Bailey 

Jeffrey Thomas Layton Wilmington 



HTo-major H Honors Program S Uimeraty Scholars Program 

'CumLjude ** Magna Cum Laude •••SummaCumLaudc 

14 



S** Shannon Marie Mullens Casar 

* Christie Ann Shepherd Tarboro 

Science Education, Middle Grades 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Laura Teresa Day Greensboro 

Michelle Rebecca Flowers Fuqua; Varina 

* Guy David Munger Raleigh 

♦♦♦ Katherine Wilkins Smyre Gary 

Technology Education 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1 996 

James Walter Brown III Durham 

Bennett Michael Harris Smithfield 

Nahanni McMeans Goldsboro 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1 996 

George Anthony Sales Asheville 

Rex Olson Woody, Jr Newland 

Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

Daniel Benjamin Alley Raleigh 



College of Engineering 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

David McKinley Stein, Jr Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

** David Spruill Anderson Rocky Mount 

Channin Hyde Bennett Raleigh 

Sandra Kay Cartwright Winston-SaJem 

Susan Louise Cauley Kinston 

S*** Wendy Michelle Lovelace Lawndale 



*Co-inajor H Hooon ^Dgra/n S Uimersit> SchoUn Program 

*Cum Laudc **MaKna Cirni Laudc •••SummaCum Laudc 

15 



Charles Worth McCormick Fairmont 

Brian Matthew Simpson Marshville 

Katherine Nicole Stanette Currituck 

Rachel Ann Vanbenthuysen Gary 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

Degree Conferred June 25, 1 996 

Dermott John Cooke Cleveland, OH 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

John Walter Dettelbach Hickory 

Stephen Forrest Morton Reidsville 

** Roger Alan Serrette Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Textiles and the College of Engineering. 
Degree Conferred June 25, 1996 

Aaron Scott Earley Leicester 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

Eric Jon Campbell Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Andrea Lynn Berry Engelhard 

Catherine Leigh Briley Greenville 

** Jennifer Lynne Holt Elkton, MD 

Jason Boyette Shirley Cary 

* Jennifer Leigh Singletary Winston-Salem 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Degree Conferred June 25, 1 996 

Dawn Marie Fra Andover, CT 

Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

Thomas Stevenson Bowie Raleigh 



+Co-niajof H Honon Prograin S Unhasit) ScboUn Program 

*Cuni Laudc ••Magna Cum Laude •••Summa Cum Laudc 

16 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Degree Conferred June 25, 1996 

+ Eric Alan Witzgall Dalton, MA 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

Shannon Kelly Cox Sanford 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

+ Robert Layne Andrews : . Covington, VA 

Steven Christopher Bacon Dexter, GA 

♦ Kendra Krystyna Batley Wilmington 

James Edwin Cawthome, Jr Lynchburg, VA 

+ Azelia Carolnet Edwards Snow Hill 

Christel Linnette Graham Wilmington 

Angela Dawn Hall Burlington 

+** Jon Russell Jackson Ashland, VA 

♦ Phillip Todd Jordan Rock Hill, SC 

+ Seung Yong Lee Fayetteville 

+* Jess Vail Nauman McLeansville 

♦** Wesley Boyd Petrea Kannapolis 

+♦* Sue Ann Quick Piney River, VA 

* Melissa Carol Ricks Smithfield 

James Earle Ringelspaugh Rocky Mount 

*♦ Timothy Lee Schleining Pisgah Forest 

**♦ Son Ngoc Tran Raleigh 

S** Robert Chung-Hua Yang Chesterfield, VA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Stacie Deyton Burleson Bumsville 

Sean Aaron Dolle Jacksonville, FL 

John Harrison Ellinwood Raleigh 

Bryan Clinton Key Staley 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1 996 

Steven Kenneth Gagnon Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

S+* Jessica Claire Allen Tampa, FL 

* Bryon James Brown Seagrove 

** John Thomas Calvin Cary 

Kenneth Parker Cates Wilson 

*** Jeffrey Dalton Causey Grifton 

Donald Lee Curry, Jr Fayetteville 

Joshua Grady Dalton Brevard 



♦Co-nujor H HoDOf3 Prognin S Unhenii) SdioUn Pragnin 

•CumLaude **Mjgna Cum Ljude •••Summa Cum Laude 

17 



+♦ Jason Scott Geary Wilmington 

Sean Patrick Gleason Pittsburgh, PA 

♦ Aaron Scott Harrell Brevard 

+♦ Jennifer Denys Harrison Roanoke Rapids 

Kevin Rondel Hedrick Lexington 

Kyle Arthur Hubert Gary 

Jeremy Scott Icard Conover 

Tod Micah Kobik Shaftsbury, VT 

*♦ Cahal Joseph Lyden Wendell 

Matthew Daniel Mead St. Charles, IL 

Michael Andrew O'Sullivan Sanford 

Richard Baldwin Priory, Jr Charlotte 

Michael Patrick Reese Raleigh 

John Phillip Rhyne Lewisville 

Gary Ray Schenk, Jr Salisbury 

** Barbara Ann Sich Wilmington 

Erich William Strohhacker Lincolnton 

Karen Allison Thomas Charlotte 

+*♦ Mark David Thompson Burlington 

Brian Thomas Williams Spindale 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING - CONSTRUCTION OPTION 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Scott Alan Clark Raleigh 

♦ Bao Quoc Nguyen Gary 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

♦ Bradley Dean Bowling Burlington 

♦♦ Johnny Lee Branch Mount Airy 

Hoye McCray Coates Mars Hill 

David Lane Core Dunn 

Samuel Stephen Daniel Elm City 

Christopher Keith Davis Charlotte 

William Scott Grigg Lawndale 

David Aaron Hollis Leland 

Anthony Neil Jarman Pink Hill 

William Todd Lambert Burlington 

Hillary Hillsworth Leacock Tobaso 

♦ Robert Chadwick Link Statesville 

+ Brian Thomas Massengill Benson 

Robert Daniel McDiarmid Raeford 

♦ David Brewster Moore Raleigh 

Brian Gordon Moss Stem 

Daniel Scott Poulton Charlotte 

Paul Alan Stephenson Raleigh 

** Jeremy Davis Troxler Elon College 

Brian Craig Young Matthews 



-KTo-nujor H Honors Program S Uahcnity Sdiotan PiDgram 

*Cuin Laude **Maena CumLaude •••SummaCum Laude 

18 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

Arthur James Ankney III Durham 

Danny Todd Bolin Aberdeen 

Melanie Rose Boyd Bahama 

♦♦♦ Michael Chou Durham 

Tien Linh Do Raleigh 

♦ Elebeoba Ude Eni Raleigh 

Shemita Lashun Kelly Lillington 

+ Pamela Inez Thomas Hamlet 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Ammar Mohammad Bali Raleigh 

+*♦ Billy Wayne Barr, Jr Lansing 

Chad Franklin Bennett Pamlico County 

** Todd Matthew Berkebile Fremont 

Brian Lonnie Bottoms Dobson 

Michael Glenn Brandenburg Linthicum, MD 

Thomas Joseph Bryan Burger Clemmons 

S** Bryan Jennings Byerly Kannapolis 

S* Michael Chie-Kai Chu Cary 

+ Gregory Lyn Cox Durham 

+ Laura Ann Crompton Chapel Hill 

♦ Michael David Durham Raleigh 

+♦ Lief Emrald Erickson Prior Lake, MN 

Peter Bacon Forrester Lincolnton 

+♦♦* Charles Nelson Gale Winston-Salem 

Gary Dale Hoke, Jr Lewisburg, WV 

+♦** Jeffrey Douglas Jackson Red Springs 

+* Paul Gregory Kehle Boynton Beach, FL 

Jennifer Renae Laney Matthews 

Douglas Layne, Jr King 

Jason James McCarthy Wendell 

+ Gregory Christopher McGee Charlotte 

Christopher Edwin Morgan Sprivey's Comer 

S** J. Brandon Myers Lexington 

* Nina Janine Ngo Greensboro 

S*** Daniel Lyie Noffsinger Manteo 

David Linwood Pearce Ahoskie 

Jason Bromwell Phebus Charlotte 

*** Thomas Joseph Pierce Charlotte 

Srikanth Ponnapalii Guntur, India 

Steven Lee Rose Morganton 

S+** Bryan Scott Schuiz Columbia, SC 

S+*** Vance Alexander Tate Greensboro 

+ Walter Scott Tester Greenville 

* Mark Christopher Toburen Winston-Salem 

+* Byron Edward Trimmer Cary 

Valecia Jtannyonnoh Wahyon Monrovia, Liberia 

S*** Jay Carter Wells Miami Lakes, FL 



H Honors Program S (Jnhersity Scholars Pn>gran) 

•♦Magna Cum Laude •••Summa Cum Laudc 

19 



+♦ Michael Allen Whitaker Siloam 

Ronald G. Wilhelmson Apex 

Anthony David Womack Green Creek 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Ronald Frank Batcho, Jr Kill Devil Hills 

Russell Scott DeMolay Lagura Hills, CA 

Christopher Stephen Floyd Raleigh 

*♦♦ Patrick William Garrett Roanoke, VA 

Kyle Stanley Johnston Montreal, Canada 

David Charles Zahn Manteo 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

* Christine Michelle Barnes Gamer 

Becky Lynn Chapman Cary 

John Bainbridge Crick, Jr Apex 

Michael Jay Dickheiser Winston-Salem 

Fletcher Bartley Hubbard Southern Pines 

Timothy Eric Hunt Raleigh 

William Thomas Jefferson Chapel Hill 

*♦* Brandon Wayne Kitchen Brevard 

Rachele Shannon Kurtz Raleigh 

Ashutosh Narhari Raleigh 

Mui-Kim Ng Raleigh 

Brian Joseph Olive New Hill 

Jeremy Hand Pace Graham 

Gordon Gregory Smith Morrisville 

Nathan Phillip Stewart Julian 

Daniel Henry Strong Binghamton, NY 

Kristin Scott Thomas Raleigh 

Paula Sexton Violet Atkins, VA 

Daniel James Waller Ahoskie 

Dean Merritt West II Durham 

♦* Lane Cameron Wigley Raleigh 

♦♦♦ Andrew Michael Woods San Deigo, CA 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Arnold Richard Banks, Jr Asheville 

Michelle Dawn Banks Arapahoe 

* Neil James Bell Raleigh 

Michael Lee Burriss Fayetteville 

S*** Christopher Louis Capps Raleigh 

Michael Shannon Cirioli Raleigh 

Robert Leroy Collum, Jr Cary 

Robert Randolph Cusson Raleigh 

** Stacey Anne Eckhardt Raleigh 

* Julia Sweeney English Charleston, WV 

+♦♦♦ Charles Nelson Gale Winston-Salem 



+Co-niajof H HoDon Program S Univerrity ScboUn Program 

*CumLaude * 'Magna Cum LaiKle •••SunuiaCum Laudc 

20 



Reece Beauford Gardner, Jr Kinston 

+ Haley Wilson Gray Durham 

+ Chris Lee Grove San Jose, CA 

* Joseph Andrew Holliday Greensboro 

Harry Luther Hoots III Hendersonville 

Michael Hollis Johnson Raleigh 

Michael Vickers Johnson Raleigh 

Joel Dimitri Kamentz Raleigh 

John Paul Kelsey Gary 

Sean Philip Korb Raleigh 

Jason Jung Lai Greensboro 

Billy Leathers, Jr Raleigh 

Joseph Patrick Madden Raleigh 

♦ Julie Burkett McDonnell Sterling, VA 

Paul Christopher Mojica Morehead City 

Charles Stuart Mumford Raleigh 

♦ Dwayne Richard Need Waxhaw 

♦♦ Bradley Tadayuki Nishida Rocky Mount 

* David Scott Peterson Raleigh 

James David Roten Creston 

H** Asif Saleh Raleigh 

*♦♦ Gregg Gerald Seipp O'Fallon, IL 

Erwin David Sloan, Jr Magnolia 

Kimberly Nicole Sook Raleigh 

Derek Emil Speerschneider Novi, MI 

Elizabeth Page Strother Greensboro 

♦ Zhixin Tang Durham 

Christopher Eric Teagle Schenectady, NY 

♦♦ Chu Ly Tran Greensboro 

Ali Ribhi Treish Al-Bireh, Isreal 

* Christopher Ted Underwood Selma 

♦♦ Long Kimthi Vo Raleigh 

Trevor Lane Williams Austin, TX 

H** Robert Anthony Woodside Raleigh 

Cynthia Baldwin Wright Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT 

Degree Conferred December 18, 1996 

*♦ Edgar William Levy Youngsville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 
Degree Conferred December 18. 1996 

+ Brian Thomas Massengill Benson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Daniel John Heter III Newburgh, NY 



^o-major H Hooon Piognin S Uohenit)- SchoUn Program 

*CU]n Ljude **Ma0ia Cum Laudc ***SuiniiiaCuniLaud€ 

21 



♦ Curtis Ray Jacobs Lumberton 

♦♦ Nancy Lynn Keating Englewood, FL 

Jonathan Gaither Knox Winston-Salem 

Daryi Eugene Merritt Mount Olive 

♦ Monty Kenneth Murdock Mount Pleasant 

♦ Nakia Antoinette Rouse Hookerton 

♦ Cory Scott Thompson Durham 

Degrees Conferred August 8. 1996 

Steven Douglas Beeson Raleigh 

Lewis Philip Edwards Dobson 

Kevin James Kelly Fayetteville 

♦ Michael Chad Pease Gary 

Mookyun Frank Shin Raleigh 

Rodney Wayne Smith Wilmington 

+ Pamela Inez Thomas Hamlet 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

James Robert Adams Waynesville 

♦♦ Clint Slade Adkins King 

Geoffrey Niles Ammons Durham 

Christopher Michael Baker Bakersville 

Kevin Lloyd Baker Goldsboro 

+♦♦ Billy Wayne Barr, Jr Lansing 

Kenneth Dwain Beamon, Jr Tarboro 

Walter Perry Bullock Durham 

Christopher Judson Bumette Raleigh 

Tina Ting-Hui Chen Raleigh 

Jennifer Ann Cobb Murfreesboro 

♦ Jamie Carl Coker Mt. Olive 

♦ Jason Mansfield Cope Lexington 

+ Gregory Lyn Cox Durham 

+ Laura Ann Crompton Chapel Hill 

♦*♦ Renard Andre Dellafave Raleigh 

♦ Deborah Anne Driscoll Knox, NY 

+♦ Lief Emrald Erickson Prior Lake, MN 

Collin Joseph Every Durham 

Christopher Gillette Raleigh 

S** Kevin Patrick Hales Roanoke Rapids 

LaTonya Michelle Hammonds Lumberton 

Michael Chad Hoyle Lawndale 

Timothy Lloyd Humphrey Fayetteville 

+♦♦♦ Jeffrey Douglas Jackson Red Springs 

Edward Joseph Karwacki, Jr Kingston, NY 

+♦ Paul Gregory Kehle Boynton Beach, FL 

♦ David Benjamin Kelly Greensboro 

Steven Lawrence Koch Louisville, KY 

S* Michael George Kubovcik Raleigh 

Toi-Hung Lee Wanchai, Hong Kong 

♦* Darren Ray Lingafeldt Morganton 

Christopher Clifford Little Raleigh 



+Co-inajof H Honors Program S Uoiveraty Sdiolais Program 

•CumLaudc "Magna Cum LaiMle •••SummaCumLaude 

22 



♦* John Kenneth MacKenzie Guilford, CT 

Charles Edward Mann Bunn 

Travis Sean Mashbum Asheville 

♦ Patrick Wesley Mauney Hickory 

James Howard McCoy, Jr Jacksonville 

+ Gregory Christopher McGee Charlotte 

Gerald McGovem, Jr Raleigh 

S* Joseph Scott Miller Newton 

♦ Vanna Vince Moua Albemarle 

Bryan NeaJ Parson Asheville 

Lakeisha Nykole Pratt Durham 

Danny Lee Pride, Jr Hillsborough 

Kirk Everett Russell Winston-Salem 

S+** Bryan Scott Schuiz Columbia, SC 

♦*♦ Johnny Dale Shepherd Burlington 

Ambika Hosagrahar Somashekhar Raleigh 

S+*** Vance Alexander Tate Greensboro 

+ Walter Scott Tester Greenville 

Todd Randell Thomas Lumberton 

Scott Wilkins Todd Raleigh 

+* Byron Edward Trimmer Cary 

Christopher Michael Tripoli Montoursville, PA 

* Phillip Lee Underwood Canton 

James Wade Ussery Flat Rock 

Steven Alexander Wallace Burlington 

S*** Teresa Anne Wenger Cary 

+* Michael Allen Whitaker Siloam 

* Michael Ernest Whitley Apex 

Frank Warren Williams, Jr Greensboro 

♦ Jonathan Mansfield Williams Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

* William Watson Ross Wilkesboro 

Degrees Cort/erred December 18, 1996 

Michael Steven Apke Boone 

Sonya Lynn Avant Raleigh 

♦*♦ Robert Christopher Belk Lenoir 

Kristi Michelle Conder Matthews 

Lisa Tanya Davies Weldon 

Richard Edward Gay Raleigh 

+* Jason Scott Geary Wilmington 

+♦ Kathleen Patterson Gray Gastonia 

+♦ Jennifer Denys Harrison Roanoke Rapids 

*♦ Daniel Joseph Lamontagne Raleigh 

Debra Lynette McDaniel Martinsville, VA 

+* Emily Brodie Meador Henderson 

Travis Lee Morgan Robbins 

Alan Willard Moseley Valdese 



♦Co-majof H Honon Program S Unhcnity SdnUn Program 

'Cum Laudc **MaKna Cum Laude ***Summa Cum Laude 

23 



Kalian Karl Mrozek Durham 

♦♦ Margaret Maria Park Charlotte 

Valerie Jean Phipps Janettsville, MD 

Lisa Christine Presson Monroe 

Becky Rana Stansell Indian Trail 

+♦♦ Mark David Thompson Buriington 

Matthew Glenn Willis Morehead City 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRL\L ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Derek Louis Beck Raleigh 

Timothy Matthew Pridgen Durham 

Gary Samuel Spake Charlotte 

Brian Evans Trent Charlotte 

Degrees Con/erred August 8, 1996 

William Shannon Cameron Lillington 

David Ivry Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 18, 1996 

Adam Jeffrey Barlow Raleigh 

Brian Wayne Betts Raleigh 

Pedro Guillermo Cofmo Guatemala City, Guatemala 

Brian Keith Conner Richmond, VA 

Rodrigo Alfonso de la Rocha La Paz, Bolivia 

♦ Daryl Wayne Edwards Matthews 

Elizabeth Anne Fargher New Bern 

Chad James Flynt Greensboro 

Marvin Ray Gibson, Jr Raleigh 

Andreas Heppner Raleigh 

Eduardo Antonio Herrera Guatemala City, Guatemala 

Henry Lester Hill III Elizabethtown 

*♦ Sharon Lea Kastner Charlotte 

Ching-Han Lee Taipei, Taiwan 

♦ Stefan Meany Guatemala City, Guatemala 

♦ Christopher Craig Rand Charlotte 

Deena Marie Smith Charlotte 

Amy Nicole Starling Cary 

Duane Dee Tyler Copeland, KS 

Nicole Tamara Wilson Rocky Mount 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, FURNITURE 
MANUFACUTING OPTION 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Melissa Capitano Charlotte 

Timothy Joe Moore Ellerbe 

Laurence Joseph Pollen Winston-Salem 

Thomas Levi Van Dyke IV Yanceyville 



tCo-major H Hooon Program S Uimerat> Sdwlan Program 

'Cum Laude **Magna Cum Liudc •■*Summa Cum Laude 

24 



Degree Conferred August 8, 1996 

John Christian Hindsley Fayetteville 

Degrees Con/erred December 18. 1996 

* Daryl Ashley Camper Rutherfordton 

Timothy Brian Frasure Maiden 

Eugene Christopher Hollifield, Jr Marion 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

Degrees Con/erred August 8, 1996 

Kevin Rennard Davis Glen Bumie, MD 

Nathan Thomas Luck Sanford 

Howard Levone Toomer, Jr Rocky Mount 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred June 25, 1996 

Antonia Maria Arnold Spartanburg, SC 

John Richard Boswell Burlington 

Derrick Rodney Coates Fayetteville 

Robert Michael Gron, Jr Fort Bragg 

Ryan Robert Krause Forked River, NJ 

* Brian Francis Mellage Raleigh 

Avneet Sood Eden 

* Wesley Allan Yates Rockingham 

Degrees Conferred August 8, 1996 

Steven Banh Chapel Hill 

Jeffrey Dwayne Farris Greensboro 

Troy Allen Garcia Chicago, IL 

Joshua Wilson Kersey High Point 

Alan Lee King Asheville 

Emily Annette Miller Gastonia 

Eric William Nordquist Lexington, SC 

Brian Scot O'Neill Chelsea, MA 

** Dwight Kingsley Roberson Wilmington 

Paul Joseph Romiti Raleigh 

Michael Charles Stone Louisburg 

Degrees Conferred December 18. 1996 

* Robert Fagan Alford, Jr Raleigh 

* Douglas Ray Babcock Rockaway, NJ 

Bertram Glenn Barco Piscataway, NJ 

* Jimmy Autrey Beacham, Jr Kitty Hawk 

Corey Derek Brown Fuquay-Varina 

* Andrew Jason Burris Kannapolis 



♦Co-major H Hooon Program S Unh enily Sdwian Program 

*Ciun Laude • 'Magna Cum Laude ••♦Summa Cum Laude 

25 



Michael Todd Clay Granite Falls 

♦♦ Mark Alan Coats Raleigh 

James Mitchell Cockerham, Jr Gastonia 

David Amos Cooper Shelby 

Elmer Vinc